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Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/07/2010 in Blog Comments

  1. 8 points
    I feel good. My general reading ability has improved. Compared with a couple years ago—when I started with Chinese literature—I read faster and refer to dictionaries less than before. I understand more of what I read and can engage with literary works critically (e.g., get a feel for differences in style and tone, assess their merits and weaknesses, etc.). I am starting to enjoy Chinese literature as literature, rather than as a series of difficult foreign texts. This is very satisfying and rewarding, and was in fact my primary goal. Reading millions of characters in a non-native language is a useful motivational frame, but of secondary importance. I am also more confident that I will read very difficult Chinese literature that not-to-long-ago seemed far beyond my abilities. I want to (eventually) read works like 《倾城之恋》, 《狂人日记》, and 《红楼梦》. I believe that someday I can and will. Many years ago, I read David Foster Wallace’s magnum opus Infinite Jest. Working through and completing this massive work was a formative experience in my twenties; it made me think about and appreciate our world differently, and in (I hope) a fuller and more nuanced and empathetic and emotionally available way. Reading a million characters of mostly beautifully written Chinese feels kinda like that. Life is precious and short and brutal and lovely and much more. At their best, literature and the arts capture and represent these aspects of life in ways that more mundane day-to-day experience often hides or obscures. Our world is vast and complex. Artists in different cultures get a handle on this vastness and complexity differently. This difference is really what I’m after, and it’s why I read in Chinese.
  2. 6 points
    Sorry guys for the wait. To answer a few questions: No I’m not a PoC, I’m white, and look fairly Turkish although I’ve had a few people confuse me for a somethingstan country or Latina. I shaved my hair in a rather drastic undercut and looked ‘biker’ or a ‘butch’ according to my friend whenever I freshly shave it. I’ve been letting it grow now because it’s cold outside. I still have 1 ½ years left of my program. The democrat guy is still around, actually last week he was talking with me about how a democrat was elected in Alabama, the first in more than two decades. A “win for us” lol. I’m nicer to him now because I think he just means well. He’s been a bit better and generally just wants to talk with me and not intentionally be an ass. I even asked him to be part of my study because I thought he understood a lot about America and his insights would be interesting. But I still can’t help from time to time to get annoyed with him lol. Take today for example, he told me that yesterday this one teacher said my use of ‘scattered’ in the translation was bad, and that the other foreign students use of ‘distributed’ was just as bad. I’m like so what was her suggestion to use? He’s like nothing. And I was like hmm okay. I think it’s just literary preference. And he’s like no she said its 100% wrong. My impression was him going like ‘haha you got your English criticized’. Are people still intimidated by me? Yeah. Lol. I think I’m too direct. If I say anything like What? They get really scared. Perhaps its my tone. Like today when I asked the democrat ‘so what did she suggest to use in its place?’ he got all nervous like err uhh. But I was just curious, not trying to get all sassy. There was another time that the teacher asked this one girl in the class to explain this cultural term to us, and she was so afraid to look at us. Some classmates are less scared… I actually had one of my classmates ask me if I could help her with knitting because I had commented on one of her wechat posts about it. Lol. Shew as really cute and forgot completely how to knit so she picked a day and brought her needles and yarn and I helped her. Everyone found out later like OMG YOU KNIT??? *points at my scarf* did you knit that? And I’m like yeah lol. But honestly I think part of the reason people are more intimidated by me is because I don’t stand for shit. Like just now I was discussing with this girl in my group that they needed to decide among them who would be the other interviewer in the mock conference, so then she suggested I speak in Chinese and the other interviewer use English, I told her that the teacher doesn’t want us to do it that way, she already told me. So then she goes ‘Everyone will think it’s unfair if you speak in English’ so I’m like ‘What I mean to say is that the teacher has already explicitly told us 3 foreign students that she wants us to use English, this is why all of us have the role as interviewer and not translator. If you think its unfair than that’s on you. But this class is translation of English into Chinese so it doesn’t make sense for me to disregard the teachers’ instructions because you think I’m not being ‘fair’. She was like oooh I didn’t say I said it was unfair. And im like okay whatever. Maybe I’m sensitive but that kind of presumption that im somehow being unfair or cheating I find ridiculous coming from a person who probably copied in its entirety 2 papers. This girl is literally always finding ways to piss me off. And I always forgive her for it. Last time she was all “can you put more effort into commenting/correcting my work. And I’m like “if you have a problem with the way I correct you can ask someone else. And shes all nooo that’s not what I meant, I like your corrections. Really? Because it doesn’t sound that way. Lastly, I suspect my teacher has Asperger’s or is on the autism scale. So maybe that’s why hes a bit jumpy around me. I didn’t want to say it because I’m not a professional, but its just a small observation. LiMo I think you need to be more confident. You need to stop letting yourself think you’re not good enough. The fact of the matter is you’re in this program and doing the same assignments as everyone else. Yeah it’s not easy but you know what you’re here and you’re doing it. I think once you get a bit more adjusted to the classroom setting you’ll begin to realize your classmates aren’t any better. Okayy soo now my week (basically) I’m going to post it now because Im probably going to get no time to study on Saturday. Sunday 12/17/17 Translation hw E-C Make a glossary of unknown words 12:10-1:02 Translate 1:02-1:26 halfway; 6:03-6:15; 6:29 -6:50 Total time: 24+12+20 = 56 minutes Review my translation: 30 minutes Review classmates: 9:30pm -10:08pm = 38 minutes ** (For this class we need to review our partners work) Complete total: 52 +56+30+38= 176 minutes = 2 hours 54 minutes --------------------------------------- Translation hw C-E Make a glossary/read over: 10:40pm – 11:00pm Translation 11:00pm – 11:19 Total: 39 minutes ---------------------------------------- Sight translation hw: Watch video: tedtalk 15 minutes. Take down phrases, idioms, or “old” words with new meanings 11:35 – 12:06 AM finished Translate: 12:09 AM – 12:33 AM Total: 1 hour 3 minutes. Over all total: About 4 hours 36 minutes ----------------------------------------- Monday 12/18/17 Overslept and missed class at 8. 9:50-10:14 began reviewing my notes for recording 10:35 – 11:45 research & creating glossary (about AI) 2:00-3:30 Research for papers/reading 4:00-5:45 Group work, discussion on translation homework. Then I worked on the rest of my paper until about 1 AM (sorry I forgot when I started, I was in a procrastination fit where I was ladeedaing in my friends room before dinner and then after lololol. I’m gonna guess I actually started this at 9/9:30) Total hours spent: about 8 hours (~4 hours on the stuff before paper writing at night, then like 3-4 hours for writing my paper at night) (Sorry I don;t know what happened. I didn't write anything for Tuesday... I have no idea what I did that day. Probably just writing my paper) Wednesday 12/20/17 No classes in the morning. Slept till 10:30, woke up and ladeeda'd until I could no longer ignore work. 11:30 – 12:15 Finish up glossary for AI, because Banzhang just told us we must submit it to her by tonight (originally wasn't supposed to be submitted in advance). Lunch and class ->4:45 5:30-5:45 Finish up the glossary (just a few words missed), put together assignment to submitted to banzhang. 5:45-> 6:48 working on my speeches (practicing, cutting down, editing. Etc.)** I don't know if I should include this or not, this is not for school** 6:51- 7:30 going through news, preparing for a topic for Friday Total: 3 hours 9:52 working on paper 2, collecting stuff and stuff until 11pm. Complete total ~ 4hours Thursday 12/21/17 Woke up sick, stayed in bed all day but alas I must finish my paper or at least get it half written 4:45pm begin working on my paper until like 6:30pm break 9:05 back to paper until about 11pm total time: ~4 hours Friday 12/22/17 Still sick, feeling worse. Skipped my first class because I can't even speak. Forced myself to go teach today at 10, then forced myself to the afternoon class ->2:55 Got a tanghulu and ran errands and drank tea/relaxed until about 5:00 5:00-5:30 pointless group discussion on how to do the mock conference. Ended up frustrated. 5:30-6:30, going through my research collected through three sources for my TAPs research. Very interesting and funny feedback. Im really glad I picked the people I did to do it, even if I’m not familiar with many of them at all. total time spent: 1hr 3 minutes So I spend roughly 4 hours/day on my studies. Sunday is an exception because I relax on Saturday (basically do nothing) ** Speech preparation is for a speech competition I got nominated for, not in school but at this radio program, the guy liked me when he met me for a job interview last month and called me up to ask if I'd be interested. i accepted but now i kind of regret it. Besides not having enough time, and now that i'm sick, theres the fact that this competition is clearly just meant to be like 'oh china is #1' and I'm essentially only there as a 'waiguo ren' to gawk at. But I'll try and have fun with it.
  3. 5 points
    I think this is an acceptable reply to your comment. Nobody learning Chinese writing cannot not study calligraphy. Either that, or one should more correctly understand me if one thought I was not talking about calligraphy. (By now I'm getting the impression that it would be better just to say I never ever talk about calligraphy.) Also, to call your point of view contemporary and functional implies that it is more contemporary and functional than something else. I'm guessing that you mean it's enough for newbs to just write legibly with whatever stroke order they want. However, I think it is still better to prescribe something (as language instruction cannot work without some prescription) and people are doing so already, as I said in the blog post. What is different between their prescriptions and my prescriptions (excluding Japan to an extent) is that mine describe something that exists or existed. Most of their standards come from nowhere. What makes it seem more functional to follow the standards is that their information is more widespread (and newly spread among the newly literate), while information obtained from research has been kept among a few people who already knew how to write anyway. Before the Republic, most people who could write wrote with correct stroke orders. Standards with errors caused the majority of the population to learn errors. This is where the new "right" comes from. Taking pre-Republic Chinese writing into account, they are more prescriptivist than me. I feel like I'm rambling....
  4. 4 points
    Yeah, those kind of inadvertent assumptions are really encouraging. I was settling up at the till in a Chinese restaurant once, asked for our bill, paid it, and was getting the change when the girl looked up for the first time, only to give a little yelp when she realised she'd been talking to a foreigner. Little things, but nice.
  5. 4 points
  6. 4 points
    1. What is the topic of their conversation? 2. Why does 谭艾琳 finally decide to broach this subject? 3. What feelings does 谭艾琳 have towards 建豪?
  7. 3 points
    This should be 明明. I know you're thinking that second squiggle doesn't look anything like 明 and you're right. That squiggle means 'duplicate of the previous character'.
  8. 3 points
    Actually, it's very Chinese to try and puncture a friend's small balloon of happiness like that.
  9. 3 points
    What an inspiration! I'm encouraged to move off of graded readers and read more legitimate Chinese novels this year.
  10. 3 points
    I have only done one Masters; came in with some background knowledge. Others on the course were very fresh so it’s normal to see a big variation in the baseline levels of the students. Don’t let it get to you. 加油!
  11. 3 points
    Welcome back, @js6426! How much would you say your Chinese has improved over the last year and a half of school? Have you started reading Chinese literature?
  12. 3 points
    I'm not familiar with 蕭紅, but I've read a fair amount of 魯迅, therefore not surprised by the style. It was 1935. 白話文 or written vernacular Chinese was far from mature. There's a lot of experiments going on. Sometimes a writer would even deliberately pursue a 'translationese' style.
  13. 3 points
    It's to discourage "squatters", who may choose to balance precariously with their feet on the toilet rim.
  14. 3 points
  15. 3 points
    I would say 'functional' and that's about it. And that's not just me being modest. By functional I mean, I have no problems understanding anything in class and communicating with professors and completing tasks in translation and interpretation. But I'm lacking in certain registers, for instance, formal register... vocabulary isn't big enough, and lack knowledge in culturally specific things. And I obviously have an accent lol. I think this level is okay for the program, but if you were higher than functional it would probably be better, but having around my level you can still learn a good amount. Like I mentioned before the class is taught usually in a mix of Chinese and English, unless you have a teacher who would rather just speak Chinese, which I have had.. and tasks are between E-C and C-E, so I think as long as one of your languages is better you'll have an okay time. There are a handful of my classmates that seem to struggle more than me, and I think its important to note because there is always an assumption that the foreign student will encounter more problems than their chinese classmate, but its simply not true. I think these students have a lower English level than my Chinese, and some of them come from parts in China that have an accent, so those students struggle with Chinese as well. One of my classmates who I ate with last week was looking at the menu, and I remembered she wanted Eggplant last time but got her order mixed up and ended up with tomato egg so I was looking for an eggplant dish for her to order when she mused out loud "番茄是不是茄子?" And i was like No.... its Tomato. And it suddenly dawned on me that last time when she got tomato egg it wasn't because a mix up in the kitchen but because she herself had ordered the wrong thing. Then I partnered with this other girl who I've kind of worked with before but never in consecutive translation, so we were comparing our notes and I found her listening skills were quite low because she only got the very short beginning of the audio on The year of the Dog, where as I had nearly all the important points. Then again I think my school is definitely not the greatest. So that might be why this kind of level would be okay for an average school. But probably not appropriate for an outstanding school with an outstanding program.
  16. 3 points
    Well, imagine if Western universities were honest about their China programmes: "First Year: A1: Incredibly basic Chinese." "Second Year: A1-A2: Still Basic Chinese." "Third Year: A2-B1: Upper Basic/Lower Intermediate Chinese." "Fouth Year: B1+: Intermediate Chinese." Meanwhile, the students of other "easier" language programmes like French/German/Spanish are actually getting really far in their studies, like into the C levels. It's really obvious when you look at the level of the Western students you meet in China who come over for their Chinese semester/year. They usually get placed with Koreans/Japanese who've been studying for like a semester or two. The really good Westerners typically took Chinese in high school so have more experience, or just studied their butts off outside of class.
  17. 3 points
    The way I got around that was realising that everyone is basically lying when they talk about "advanced" classes or "advanced" books or whatever. And they do it because people like to feel that they are advanced even when they are not, and stroking their ego makes it easier to sell things. The reality is that when a school or course or test talks about being 'advanced' what it really means is 'advanced.... for a foreigner, and we don't really expect too much of foreigners anyway' rather than being an actual measure of advanced usage. At some point, reality sets in because no matter how "advanced" you are told you are, you won't feel very advanced if you have trouble reading a newspaper, following what's going on on the TV or still have problems making decent conversation. Accepting that I wasn't advanced was the first step in changing that. The next step was deciding to use reality as yardstick to measure progress rather than artificial and/or arbitrary measures of skills.
  18. 3 points
    Great article and thanks for sharing (I've also just blasted through your other posts so I'll be summing it all up here). I can really empathise with you on the studying issue. I'm on exchange in China, and while my classmates and I are taking an "advanced chinese" course back home, we're basically at primary school level here (in some ways more advanced but obviously in terms of spontaneity and fluency it's not great). It's a super kick in the self esteem and it had me down for ages. If you're interpreting then your Chinese must be pretty darn good. It's really mean of people to criticise you considering the fact they would have just as hard a time if the situation was reversed. As for the Chinese uni not being prepared for foreign students, we also had a similar situation. Chinese universities are used to foreigners coming to study Chinese, but outside of those language learning majors foriegn students are so rare that they're simply not ready for us apparently. Some of my classmates were on the system, some weren't, our campus cards didn't work at all and a lot of the administrative staff had no idea what to do with us. Don't even get me started on the ridiculous amount of bureaucracy. Go to building C to set up wifi access and internet fees, then the library to pay a deposit and activate the card for library access, then go to office Z to confirm that you're living off campus blah blah blah. So tiresome. Classes have been extremely hit and miss depending on the format. The "easier" classes have a teacher who sits up front and drones on for three hours while using a powerpoint which I dutifully take pictures of for future study. The hard classes, like the very first one I had on Republican Era History, consisted of an old guy with a super thick accent talking about himself and cracking jokes for 2 hours, and then an hour of presentations by students, no accent but super fast. I didn't even bother to pretend I was going to sit the exam. There are good days and bad days and the teachers do go easy sometimes, but it's also annoying to be frequently underestimated. I mean I sit through my class on comparative literature (the books are in English so that's a god send) and l understand basically everything that's said, my problem is I can't formulate responses quick enough to really add to the discussion. Apparently though this has been taken as indication that I don't understand much of anything, so when I do chime in on occassion I'm frequently met with literal exclamations of "Oh you understand that?" Yes I do, I'm here because I speak Chinese! And to something you said in another post the rude assumption that I don't understand Chinese becomes very annoying when people feel the need to just talk about you as if you aren't there. I hate confrontation and of course my Chinese isn't great so I seldom have the chance to put someone in their place with a witty tongue lashing, but man I can't wait for the day when I can. You definitely study way more than me. I'm having such a hard time studying Chinese now that I'm in China haha. So ironic. Being forced to use it in daily life can take the fun out of it. Regarding classmates fear and the teacher's too, I suspect you would have brought this up before if it was relevant, but are you visibly non-White/African American? I'm a black guy in China and I'm quite familiar with the fear my very presence can illicit (I'm tall but also super slim, so not really that imposing). I've seen people crossing the street when they see me and then crossing back once I've passed, people visibly flinching away from me to hide behind their boyfriends as they see me on the street etc. (come to think of it it's only really girls and young women that I've seen act like this). I don't jump to conclusions and I always give the benefit of the doubt, but I checked with my classmates and they've never experienced stuff like that, sometime's there's no other conclusion to come to.
  19. 3 points
    Well, that depends. Applying some fuzzy logic, it seems they'll pick your package up at your door for free. But if you want to collect your incoming package at the counter, you're going to have to splurge on a nice steak to divert Fido. Don't think a left-over mooncake will do.
  20. 3 points
    Thanks gwr71. No I haven't got that book yet. To be honest at the moment I am finding that my teachers are the best resource, and it also helps that they know what we should be learning when, and so can go into the required detail. Further on I think grammar books will be much more useful. Iso, sure thing! 他没在游泳呢。 他在在室外跑步呢。 昨天上午十点我在教室上课呢。 今天是周末,我要出去玩二,不要学习。 我打电话给妈妈。 The questions all cover grammar that we have gone over in class.
  21. 3 points
    Could you please give us one or two example sentences where you had to say if they were written correctly or not? I'm curious to see the kind of mistakes that your teacher presents to you at this stage.
  22. 3 points
    I've been off the forum for quite a while now, so I've got a lot of catching up to do reading through, but I've just sat down and read all of your updates! Good work! I've been debating studying a Bachelor degree in China for a while now and I finally decided to do it a couple of months back, so now I'm in the stages of preparing for next September. This blog has really motivated me further. In fact I've decided to head out and buy the books you've mentioned and follow along with some of the things you've been doing. Perhaps sometime you could update with your typical weekly schedule? Like how many classes per day, and how long you have to spend doing homework each night. Looking forward to keeping up with this for the next 4 years ha! Hopefully by the time you week year 2, I can start my 'Week 1' log.
  23. 3 points
    This sounds like that farmer a few years ago, who when asked 你幸福吗? replied 不,我性王。 He was also adept at not 谈ing 国事.
  24. 3 points
    On the bright side, after one month of effort, your current high-score is more than double the score from the first day, and the scores look like they are slowly trending upwards - so it looks like it's working! (see this post for the 3 month progress report of someone doing a similar thing for listening rather than transcribing). I think it's good to have a stroll through the HSK forest to see how it compares. Large amounts of mostly comprehensible input will be much better for your skills than large amounts of incomprehensible input. That being said, given that you are scoring very highly on 'Slow Chinese', you might find it more beneficial to swap out 'Slow Chinese' for HSK, rather than 'Great Marriage'. You learn by pushing your boundaries, not by staying within them - the downside of this is that by constantly pushing your boundaries you'll always feel like you are not making any progress because you're always coming across stuff that you don't get on the first pass. That's where keeping track of various metrics like you are doing comes in useful. Also, the way to improve TV drama vocabulary is to watch more TV dramas. If you stop with the drama, you might find you don't actually pick up the vocabulary required to make much of a dint in that 70% figure. Due to incredibly long tail of Chinese vocabulary, and the completely different domains you might find that the increase in vocab you get from HSK recordings only gives a small improvement to understanding TV Drama (see here for my thoughts on that).
  25. 3 points
    Life happens, I've stopped studying so many times I can't count them. Kudos to you for reviewing the past chapters and plowing on with your textbooks. I tend to switch resources when restarting studying, it makes for a rather disjointed learning. I really should stick to one main textbook series and only vary the extras.
  26. 3 points
    More along the lines of I associate words with a "女" as related to females or to (stereotypical) female traits. 女孩子 and 孫女 come to mind, of course, and to me "女婿" felt similar to those.
  27. 3 points
    Great puzzle. I tried it without checking any dictionary or using my Chinese input tool. I just cut and pasted what you had. Have not checked my answers (I'm sure I missed a few). Here's what I got:
  28. 3 points
  29. 3 points
    Oh! I like these a lot. I learned a couple of new words with this one! BTW, I think the caption is slightly wrong for the third one. If you look closely, there is an open container of red lip balm (or whatever it's called....) next to her, which is what I think she is doing.
  30. 3 points
  31. 3 points
  32. 3 points
    Alright, you win. I have been silly and you are absolutely the most clever person I have met in my life, so far. End of conversation.
  33. 3 points
    My understanding is that 海 means "vast" here. Here is a story on the origin of the term -> “海报”探源
  34. 3 points
    Lately I've enjoyed 普洱, but it seems most of the time I drink 龍井. Chrysanthemum is also nice.
  35. 2 points
    I agree, there is little value in asking you to make a sentence with a noun, or proper noun, like “North Korea”. Because a lazy student can always just say “I like X.” But that is poor quality teaching. The teacher is thinking, “I’ve got this tool which I can always rely on which is to ask them to make a sentence with the new word.” A better teacher would have a good idea of the kind of sentence they want you to make already and choose word(s) to direct you towards that. So, better sentence generation tasks would be: 1. Use 朝鲜 and 想 to 造句子. Here the teacher wants you to make the simple sentence 我想去朝鲜. 2. Use 朝鲜 and 觉得 to 造句子. This is asking you to use the newly learnt word to express an opinion. This should remove the difficulty with the ‘making a sentence’ activity which is usually: “where do I even begin?” 3. Use 朝鲜 and 往返票 to 造句子. This is now getting more difficult. The student should easily be able to come up with a sentence in English like: “I want to buy a return ticket to North Korea.” But will then have to think carefully and sentence structure and ordering. As Weyland says, simply memorising semantic pairs is only going to get you so far. The job of the teacher is to help you integrate new vocabulary into existing schemes by carefully thinking about the sentences they want you to make. So, in conclusion, I have sympathy for your position, but I don’t think we should give up on the “making a sentence” activity just yet.
  36. 2 points
    I feel personally attacked.
  37. 2 points
    This was actually why this area has been such a massive stumbling block for me. I really felt like it was reinventing the wheel. In my post from January this year I mentioned one of my year goals was to get proficient in Pitman shorthand. I actually dedicated a LOT of time to this system in the first term of the course, as I really believed if I could take down an entire speech, then I was safe. I actually got not bad at it after about three months of practice, but something very obvious was happening: I was looking at my notes and doing sight interpreting, which was far, far worse structurally than those who were using symbol systems. If youve ever tried sight interpreting (somebody gives you the full speech or essay, and you translate it orally as you read), you'll know its a different skill entirely, and perhaps the most difficult of all. It requires you to transform every detail from written style to oral style, flipping all the grammar and dealing with issues like terminology/characters youve never come across and cant let go of psychologically. Very difficult. A shorthand system where you transcribe sound but not meaning (ie all english shorthands) is a massive trap, as its even further away from the whole idea of 'skopos theory'. There are vaguely established symbol systems that many interpreters share, like the symbol for 國 as shown above. But ultimately, its about finding the quickest routes through your own brain, and factoring in the different specialisms that different interpreters work in, having your own system really is the only way unfortunately.
  38. 2 points
    I'm imagining a "new new" HSK where they lock you in a room and you have to decipher one of these instruction manuals under a time limit...
  39. 2 points
    I know how much everyone has been dying to know how the manhole reconstruction near my apartment has been progressing, so here's an update. They removed the old sofa once the cement had set, but it started cracking almost immediately. It has been re-done again, and now a another sofa has been put in place (as well as a couple of chairs for the manhole a bit further back). I really can't imagine where all this old furniture keeps coming from...
  40. 2 points
    杯葛 A Cantonese-speaking friend once used this word in a chat, and since it's not a commonly used word on the mainland, she immediately asked me if I understood. I said "Of course, boycott mah." (In fact, in this specific case, it means 'to ostracize'.) And she was like, "Wow, I didn't know it's a loanword!" On the face of it 杯葛 looks like there might be some ancient Chinese 典故 involved. And it's hard to connect it with 'boycott' if you don't know the Cantonese pronunciation 'bui1 got3'.
  41. 2 points
    And the great thing is, if you're getting enough input, you'll eventually get around to seeing and learning those other deleted words in context too. It's just much more effective to wait until you know you need to learn them, and much more effective to study a small amount of relevant vocab than a large amount of irrelevant vocab.
  42. 2 points
    From Guifan: 动: 用在动词后面, 表示有了结果或达到了目的 找着了 | 猜着了 | 听不着。 note, in this usage it's pronounced zháo
  43. 2 points
    I found as a learning aid, Anki doesn't suit me. It works better as a revision aid. My setup may be suboptimal but I have sentences or phrases in my cards which is supposed to be better. In my limited time and practice, I try to aim to know words better.
  44. 2 points
  45. 2 points
    Here's my try. It's not much of a comic but a description using my limited Chinese. Enjoy.
  46. 2 points
  47. 2 points
    What is a "鸟意思"? I know what a "normal" 意思 is, but a bird one?
  48. 2 points
    餸 is the dishes in a meal that you eat to go with (送) rice (which is the staple food, at least traditionally in the South). PS - when a system can't generate the word, people just present the word as (食送) instead. Same as (車立), a word created to present the Cantonese version of lift/elevator.
  49. 2 points
    Yes, I have heard about the ”户籍制度“, but did not know it is such an intricate system. I am getting a better grasp of it now, but there is still much to learn.
  50. 2 points
    I really like your blog, and I'm sorry if this first comment comes off as critical; it's not meant to be. I'd like to know what you think. Anyway, it always bothers me when talking about names in an Eastern vs. Western concept that many westerners seem to have the wrong idea about the cultural importance of names. I am of the opinion that only sound matters for most people; my parents had no idea what "Trevor" "meant" when they named me that--they just liked the *name* and gave it to me. Thus, I would argue that when we talk about "translating names" in the English context, we are actually talking about transliteration and that "translation" as you refer to it would have to be specified to be done that way in the realm of names. Whenever I talk to a Chinese person about names and tell them that a name generally doesn't have meaning like a Chinese name, usually the Americans around me will vehemently argue that they do so have meaning. I think people confuse semantic "meaning" with actual "significance" of names (like whether I was named after my great-grandfather or whether my name is held as something special by those who care about me). I think that your drawing the translation and transliteration distinction, while true in most other language domains does not apply to English names in most circumstances. Or, inasmuch as it does, it's culturally appropriate to call an English > Chinese transliteration a "translation": If sound is the only culturally meaningful element, then the semantic meaning (marking of the person) is preserved and this certainly counts as translation. I think that your trying to draw the technical distinction is confusing and will just more confuse those without a linguistics background.
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