Jump to content
Chinese-forums.com
Learn Chinese in China

Featured

  1. Luxi

    Luxi

    Members


    • Points

      42

    • Content Count

      842


  2. roddy

    roddy

    Administrators


    • Points

      33

    • Content Count

      20,974


  3. mungouk

    mungouk

    Members


    • Points

      26

    • Content Count

      1,850


  4. abcdefg

    abcdefg

    Members


    • Points

      24

    • Content Count

      6,833


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 02/08/2021 in Posts

  1. From the outstanding multi-media publication RADII ("an independent platform of artists, writers and creators dedicated to sharing vibrant stories from the rarely explored sides of new China"): 100 films that may help to better understand China. The list is split into 10 categories: Pre-War, Mao Years, Opening Up, Indie and Arthouse, Documentaries, Wuxia, Popcorn, China Today, Bad Movies, Animation. Where available, there are links to the individual films. The You Tube links I tried were working but unfortunately some links are region-dependent or
    10 points
  2. This one is a bit of a complex case. I actually had to revisit a lot of the research on these characters to answer this question (and to make sure I hadn't made any mistakes in the dictionary entries), and I'm going to end up rewriting some of the dictionary entries for 尚 and 堂 just to make them more clear. These were actually some of the very first entries we wrote, 6 years ago or so. Short story: 堂 is 尚 (sound) + 土 (meaning). The fact that 尚's original meaning had to do with halls doesn't automatically make it a semantic component, because it had lost that meaning by the time 尚+土
    8 points
  3. “A chord is like a family.” A video where I teach beginner jazz harmony in Chinese. https://youtu.be/qrq5dHundbc
    8 points
  4. Ready for more Zoom readings and discussions, with a movie thrown in? These come from Museum at Eldridge Street in New York via Eventbrite and are free (late nights for us on this side). The 4 events are listed on the link below. Registration through Eventbrite is required for each event separately. Mon, Mar 8, 2021, 11:00 PM –Tue, Mar 9, 2021, 12:30 AM GMT NEA Big Read 2021: Yu Hua's "To Live" In Part I of this two-part dialogue Professors David Der-wei Wang (Harvard University) and Michael Berry (UCLA) will discuss the novel in the context of other work
    5 points
  5. I think people would be more open to discussion of advantages and disadvantages if you didn't claim your opinion to be the "truth". Also one can use flashcards / spaced repetition in many different ways*, so instead of just assuming the only way that people use flashcards is like cramming for an exam you could try to understand how others find software like Anki to be a great help on their learning journey. * for example: review words that were encountered when reading preview words that are in a text memorize common phrases for conversation cont
    4 points
  6. I still don't understand why you are disparaging the use of flashcards and making them the opposite of reading. There are many people in this forum who create flashcards OUT of their reading as a form of review. I am using TofuLearn - a flashcard program - to review all the HSK 4 words, which I supposedly already learned. It seems to me that if I can recognize and define the words out of context I can even better recognize and understand them in context. And would you say, equally, that quizzes are abominable? The ones on Chairman's Bao really help me assimilate new words. And
    4 points
  7. From London Chinese Science Fiction Society (It's actually London Chinese Science Fiction Group , sorry for my lack of attention) More details here: https://londonchinesesf.com/stories/story22.html Way down on the page, there are links to the original story 《从前慢》 and to Andy Dudak's translation. To get the Zoom link, email the message: Count me in for LCSFG's next meeting! to the address on this page: https://londonchinesesf.com/connect.html
    4 points
  8. You could simply add 及格 to your vocab list. As for the 不, don't even go there.
    4 points
  9. Platform(s): PC Genre: puzzle, engineering, coding Vocab: day-to-day business vocab, engineering, technical Game description: BUILD CIRCUITS. WRITE CODE. RTFM Build circuits using a variety of components from different manufacturers, like microcontrollers, memory, logic gates, and LCD screens. Write code in a compact and powerful assembly language where every instruction can be conditionally executed. Read the included manual, which includes over 30 pages of original datasheets, reference guides, and technical diagrams. Get to know the colourful cast of chara
    4 points
  10. 众包 - crowd sourced.
    4 points
  11. Many years ago, Chinese publisher started developed own apps. I used all of them. I highly recommend these apps, because first official data and price quite fair. Later, they could update with new release of dictionary for free (or pay less fees) Bad thing: many apps, i hope if they could make like Japanese famous app Dictionaries (one for all dicts) here is links for IOS app store: 现代汉语词典 7 ($12.99) (One of best feature listening to human voice not tts, 著名播音员李瑞英标准词语播读) 新华字典 12 ($4.99)they upgraded 11 to 12 version for free. 成语大词典 ($7.99)
    3 points
  12. Flashcards aren't rote learning - certainly not once they have intervals longer than a few days. For those longer intervals, flashcards do help cement in your mind the knowledge that a certain word exists and what its (exact or approximate) meaning is. I don't see how that's a bad thing, though it's obviously no substitute for repeated exposure to a word in real life. But rote learning is great! Human beings living in civilisations have used it successfully for a very long time. I'm confident they knew what they were doing and, as a human being myself, I'm happy to learn from what
    3 points
  13. 名宿 -- saw this in an obit post for a former famous football coach (and player in his day), means famous veteran, think it's used most often for sportspeople these days. Looking it up found there's a word 宿儒 meaning similar for scholars.
    3 points
  14. OK, I'm imagining being Joe Biden in a situation where being Joe Biden is irrelevant. To be honest it's pretty much the same as not being Joe Biden.
    3 points
  15. 实际上这里也有一大堆人母语既不是汉语,也不是英语。Chinese Forums一直比较吸引我的地方就是大家互相尊重的程度比较高,至少和网上其他平台相比,气氛一向和谐理智。这20年来版主的工作的确做得很不错 😄 我在这里相对比较活跃的时候应该在2004年前吧,可想而知那时候连iPhone还没有发明出来,Google都没有上市,腾讯的市值20亿港币我们都嫌贵。此论坛能维持到现在是很不容易的。虽然严格从语言学的角度讲,我在这里学得英语可能比汉语还要多一些,但大家的陪伴仍然是对我当年一个人在北京混日子的重要精神支柱。
    3 points
  16. Lol, wrong forum 😂. I mean, you can keep trying engaging with our community in your way but I don't think you'll get very far - although I must confess that this is one of those cases where I believe I am right, but I hope I am wrong. For the time being you'll have better luck at places like Tieba, China_irl and the like. Roddy already answered why Chinese is not the main language used at chinese-forums - and he's speaking from experience. Just to elaborate a bit further: active users here either have a really high-level of Chinese or are just starting. Those at the top
    3 points
  17. 怹 Yes, it is the honorific form of 他, 'tan1', something I never knew existed - how blissfully these years have passed in the ignorance of thinking that 您 was the only one, unique in its politeness among all the other vulgar pronouns. Perhaps only 祂 might come close, but 怹 has really knocked me for six!
    3 points
  18. This was my thought process as I attempted to understand it (for context, my character recognition level is about 4500, and my word recognition level is 15,000+): 1. I started reading and immediately had to look up 代步 with my dictionary tool. 2. Was a little mystified at first by 出门总是要走, interpreting 走 as "go." But in this context, it specifically means "walk on foot." 3. "以前要学习新的知识..." -- This sentence is fairly easy, but as an English speaker, I can sometimes get a little confused when Chinese omits the subject of a sentence. It takes me an extra second or two to find out
    3 points
  19. @Sreeni based on what you said I think he probably need to read something slightly below his level and a lot of it before slowly moving up. It is hard to remember words without context and we need tons of repetition before we can intuitively understand how a word is being used. Try to use graded readers books, the ones without pinyin on top of the characters. My favourite is Mandarin Companion but I heard a lot of people also use Chinese Breeze. I also use Du Chinese but they are just lots of short articles. He should understand around 98% of what he reads and read multiple books at t
    3 points
  20. Then you may also be interested in this Chinese series. Some critics say it's one of the best, if not the best, period drama series ever produced in China although it's very little known outside. It got an incredible 9.7 rating in Douban. I agree with the critics, it is a superbly detailed study of the Ming Dynasty imperial court and provincial level politics. It focuses on a single year nearing the end of the reign of the rather eccentric Emperor Jiajing : 1566. Ming Dynasty 1566 (大明王朝1566) - English Captions and Annotations https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLyED3III7lHNdh
    3 points
  21. Welcome to the forum. Please write "online Chinese tutor" in the search box and you will find several recommendations as well as discussions of how to select a tutor. Lots of discussions here to help you. Online learning is a popular topic. It is easier to do searches using the laptop version of the forum. The search box is at the top of the page, on the right. If using the mobile version, click the magnifying glass symbol at the top of the page, and the search box will open.
    3 points
  22. The classic guoxuedashi.com website for those that use it has been rendered all but useless in the last year or so. However, I have found an excellent app that covers all the bases by accident, and thought it worth sharing here. 以觀書法 is a new app that I've been using for a few months now for reading calligraphy. However, I only just discovered the 字典 search function provides multi-dictionary entries, with direct references to classic etymology dictionaries (no they are not a replacement for Outlier, yes you should definitely still consult them). This is a must for anyone interested
    3 points
  23. The first as a word is going to be huángěi, but those characters in a sentence (he gave me a kiss, and also a dollar) could end up being hái gěi。 The second, 揭露, properly jiēlù, although I'm pretty sure you'll hear lòu quite a bit, as that pronunciation is actually more common?
    3 points
  24. Not sure if this is allowed, and whether this would be better in the resources forum? Basically I had many mp3 files in the "exam format" where each dialog is spoken at natural speed followed by a long silence, and I found such files were not so useful for general listening practice (but almost every chinese language book I've bought includes such files). So I made this app to batch process these files into a more digestible format. It's a windows app. It takes a set of mp3 files as input, and outputs a set of mp3 files. The operations it performs are user configurable
    3 points
  25. I'm working on an NLP plug-in for Anki which will come preloaded with a flashcard list including the words "success", "good fortune" and "Early Bitcoin purchaser" in 250 languages. Stay tuned.
    3 points
  26. Bad news for any superstitious types aiming for HSK 5... The vocab includes 自杀、离婚、疯、着火、漏、去世 …… and that's just in the first 4 chapters of the textbook. Then again, if you're really superstitious you wouldn't have taken HSK 四级 anyway.
    3 points
  27. You mean the the third tone sandhi. It is unrelated to the characters with multiple pronunciations. I think it a big mistake to think that if you ignore the tone, then the characters cease having multiple pronunciations. Each chinese mandarin syllable has three aspects to it’s pronunciation. An initial (usually the first vowel) a final (the rest after the first vowel) and the tone. If you change any of these, you have a different pronunciation. In other words, ignoring the initial or the final makes as much sense as ignoring the tone. If you got the the tone (or the ini
    3 points
  28. Well, from context really. I think this is why it's important to think about learning the language as a whole, not just by learning characters. Many (most?) Chinese words are made less ambiguous by using two characters in the word rather than one Erm, 长 cháng (length; long; forever; always; constantly)...? I find these two much harder to deduce from context because their meanings are quite similar. (And because it's not always clear whether a word is being used as a noun or a verb or something else!)
    3 points
  29. Hi, Happy Lunar OX new year! 牛年快乐! Sentence "饺子很贵,一龙饺子一百个克朗", should be : "饺子很贵,一笼饺子一百克朗“. If you mean you‘d like to buy one 饺子 for 100 kronor, that will be "饺子很贵,一个饺子一百克朗“ . That's too expensive 🙂 ”龙“ is dragon but ”一笼“ means one layer of a steam pot. A steam pot for business has many layers. ”笼“ is the same sound as 龙. The upper part of character "笼 " is bamboo head called 竹字头and it looks like bamboo leaves( 竹 means bamboo, pronounce "zhu2") . The original steam pot was made of bamboo, that's why "笼 " has a 竹字头。If a character has a 竹字头, usually means it
    3 points
  30. Best for me in 2020, 2 novels: 盛可以《北妹》[Sheng Keyi "Northern Girls"] 残雪《黄泥接》[Can Xue "Yellow Mud Street"] And a treatise on the Odes by Geoffrey Sampson: "Voices from Early China. The Odes Demystified". It makes the Odes fun and quite easy to read, bilingual poems, splendid translations and very good notes. I intend to stay with Can Xue and the Odes for much of 2021.
    3 points
  31. Thank you so much Kenny. This was written by an old Chinese monk 30 years ago in Hong Kong. We have a 29 years old beautiful daughter who just got married and I wanted to give her this present. Thanks.
    3 points
  32. It reads 早弄秀瓦. 弄瓦 means give birth to a baby girl. So the whole phrase means 早日生一个漂亮的女娃娃 or in English give birth to a pretty baby girl soon.
    3 points
  33. @Sreeni if you're interested in this kind of thing, I can highly recommend the Outlier Essentials add-on for Pleco, which gives etymology, info on sound vs meaning components, and in some cases examples of the ancient forms and how they evolved. I find it really useful when coming across a new character, to understand what the pronunciation clues are (if any), and what the meaning clues are. Here's the entry for 堂 (click to enlarge it):
    3 points
  34. I haven't actually gone through them myself but as far as I know the complete transcripts for all 120 episodes are available in the transcription project all the way to: if you want to add timestamps and turn them into srt files that would be great to put up too.
    3 points
  35. Xian @alantin Actually we have students staying with homestays all the time at the moment, at all schools in Beijing, Shanghai, Chengde, Chengdu, Xian and especially Taiwan. It is absolutely possible to have a normal homestay experience at the moment and our students do. The problem is how to get into China or Taiwan. Once you are inside you can study your course pretty much normally. It is possible to travel to Taiwan in some cases, depending on your background. Mainland China currently is completely impossible. Whenever this will change I have no idea and dont dare to pre
    3 points
  36. I cannot answer your question, but you might try this: Go to the discussion of 越鞠丸 yue ju wan in this TCM website and, after reading, hit the "Ask the Doctor" link (upper left) and pose your question to the administrator or editor, who presumably is a TCM practitioner. https://www.americandragon.com/Herb Formulas copy/YueJuWan.html This is the search phrase I used in Baidu (which did not yield an answer to your question.) 第四代抗精神病药和越鞠丸可以一起吃?(Literally "Can you take 4th generation antipsychotics and Yue Ju Wan together?") 非典型抗精神病药 also did no
    2 points
  37. Ok, that's the upgrading done for now. You'll notice the design has changed somewhat - we're currently running on the defaults, will restore any tweaks as they are requested (it's really only a few CSS colour changes we've done in the past). I don't think there are any major changes for users to worry about. There are some additional things I've currently got turned off, might take a look at those later. Still got a few things to work through, but everything should be running smoothly. Anyone typing BBCode like [ b] this [/ b] but without spaces - be aware that'll be
    2 points
  38. Not supported at the moment, no - best you could do would be to create some flashcards or user dictionary entries with @ at the start of their pinyin fields followed by the GR romanization (the @ would prevent it from trying to parse them as Pinyin). No plans to add built-in GR support in 4.0 either, but since you can plug in your own romanization systems (c.f. Quacking Pinyin) it should be possible to add your own support for GR assuming we don't change our minds and build it in.
    2 points
  39. Its a dangerous undertaking. Literally everything has. And whatever fond memories you most likely will barely find any traces of them. There are new things that replaced the old things, but if your memories are from more than 10 years ago, be ready for it to not be there anymore. The Beijing we came to back then to learn Mandarin does not exist anymore. There was a Facebook group last summer that memorized the "old" Beijing (well what that is of course very much depends on the person, but mainly it was 1995-2010) and it was amazing to watch with all the pictures posted, memories shared et
    2 points
  40. Finished reading 《景恒街》 by 笛安. Started reading 《雾》 by 巴金, the first book of his 爱情三部曲.
    2 points
  41. Gosh, my account still works. This is a decent necro-bump. Having quite a bit of free time, I've been going through my old photos. The ones taken with a "real" camera before I gave up and used my iPhone for everything. I'm going through them all and geotagging them. It's tricky when google maps street view is not available in China (and Baidu's is painfully slow) but what makes it even harder is that virtually nothing looks like it did back in 2006-9 when I visited Beijing regularly. Anyway, so, I was looking at a photo of Roddy stuffing his face in a restaurant i
    2 points
  42. Huh, seems like a pretty even split between 3rd/4th tone. Yep. Nope, "also pr." is "also pronounced". CC-CEDICT uses "PRC" for People's Republic.
    2 points
  43. @brownnoser @Jan Finster will see if I can do that, will keeping a neat layout! @pants that's an awesome story! I personally remember using mnemonics when preparing for my IB exams in high school, they really cut the learning curve. As for Anki, converting the whole Excel into Anki would actually be quite easy. No Python code required for that, but I want to focus on developing a proper e-book 1st and flashcards 2nd (ideally releasing both at the end of the day). @mac n cheese thanks for the input! Will keep experimenting with sizes and layout, perhaps will upload a final template
    2 points
  44. I gave you a fresh thread! 岩 is a pretty normal Chinese given name for men (although googling it I see it also works for women). 中村 does immediately peg you as Japanese. Some Chinese people have rather strong and negative views of Japanese people, though generally you should be completely fine. And if you already have a perfectly good surname in characters, it would also be strange to pick a different one. I assume your parents are also Japanese, in which case you could consider asking them if they had a Japanese given name in characters in mind for you. That would in a
    2 points
  45. ^agree with both of these. You want an English-transliterated looking name, go with 约翰 (no need for a surname). You want a Chinese native-looking name, go with 安若望. In either case, no-one will interpret you choice as denominational factionalism. Only highly specialized translators or biblical scholars would have any clue about that stuff, and even then they'd probably interpret your selection as an aesthetic choice rather than a factional one.
    2 points
  46. I admit to a strong bias against names that scream "foreigner," and if any name does it's 安约翰. Better to at least try to fit in with a Chinese-sounding Chinese name I believe. Besides, call yourself 安约翰 and English-speaking Chinese will start calling you "John." Nothing wrong with 安若望 as such but it's a bit of a mouthful if your pronunciation isn't perfect. And I think a somewhat harder consonant or two in there works best, especially in a man's name.
    2 points
  47. I use an app called Evaer. It can record the just the teachers voice on a single channel from a Skype call. But when you speak, there will be no sound on the recording. I am not bothered about recording my own voice during the lesson. In lesson, I don't concentrate on pronunciation very much and prefer to fine tune it later.
    2 points
  48. 笼 not 龙 here. 她在家酿造啤酒。 A quick Google search turns up both 个 and 块 being used with 克朗. I think 块 sounds better but that's not to say it's necessarily "right."
    2 points
  49. Yes absolutely; the app is designed for just this kind of thing. And not just change the whole thing to 80% speed, but you could, say, play sentence 1 at 80%, then sentence 1 at 100%, then sentence 2 at 80%, then sentence 2 at 100%, and so on. Oh, and in reference to sound quality, it changes the tempo, not just speed i.e. the voice pitch will not be changed. BUT it is an early version of the app, and that's why I put it here and not in Resources because I'm expecting feedback. I've processed hundreds of files with it already but it's possible that there are bugs. Also
    2 points
  50. Is it ok to send flowers to a Chinese family after a death in their family? the flowers are white and yellow but it’s a potted plant.
    2 points
×
×
  • Create New...