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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/03/2020 in all areas

  1. 9 points
    True that it felt like a park bench or a church pew. But mine was designed for a living room. This furniture is popular in traditional homes. One usually puts throw cushions on it to make it more comfortable. But it never quite works. Perhaps my western bones were too decadent. This is particularly popular in traditional homes that have a true 客厅 in which to receive guests. This deep burnished reddish-brown wood, 红木,is the material of choice. It's a type of mahogany. Lots of it is grown in the mountainous areas of SE Asia, where illegal logging still thrives. My inexpensive Kunming apartment was not a grand place that really called for such a piece. But the landlord had furnished it with left-over odds and ends, as is often the case. I had a friend in Kunming who worked part time for a company which sold this magnificent mahogany furniture. She once invited me to a big expo with displays of it from all over China. Some of the best came from the southwest border provinces. Her company bought the raw lumber from forests in Burma 缅甸 then made the actual furniture in Chinese factories. Some of it was magnificent, especiall the long conference tables made from a single tree. Some would seat 10 or 12 people on each side. Just right for a corporate board room. Smaller ones could also be used as formal dining tables in a suitable setting (not my apartment.) Funny thing about the wood furniture expo is that it turned out to be great for tasting and studying tea. Each furniture merchant displayed samples of his wares next to a temporary employee, hired for the weekend, brewing tea. He would invite prospective buyers into his area to look at the furniture and have a cup of tea. They always served very good tea, properly brewed by someone with some tea master training 茶艺师。 I moved around most of the mornings looking at magnificent wood pieces and sampling tea. Since this was in Kunming, there were dozens of first-rate Pu'er teas available. 普洱茶。 When the tea person wasn't busy, they enjoyed telling you about the tea: where it was grown, how it was cured, the best way to brew it and so on. They didn't know anything about the furniture. Most of these tea ladies wore traditional silk qipao 旗袍 dresses with flowing lines and a high collar. They were often bored, just sitting there waiting for someone to drop in and have tea. So they tended to be glad to have someone to talk to. That someone was me.
  2. 8 points
    That Reddit thread is misleading. The OP there is sharing pictures from a 2019 book that's geared towards advanced CFL students or non-Mandarin Chinese speakers who want to achieve standard pronunciation. That book is based on a 11092 word vocabulary list originally published in a 2010 book called《 汉语国际教育用音节汉字词汇等级划分》, or《等级划分》for short. The vocabulary, character, and syllable lists in the《等级划分》are explicitly cited as the provisional content for the HSK 3.0 in a paper (Liu et al. 2020) shared by the official HSK Twitter account. The finalized content for the HSK 3.0 will be released sometime in the future by the State Language Work Committee. I have managed to get my hands on a PDF of the《等级划分》. (If anybody here wants that PDF as well as an spreadsheet of the vocabulary lists it contains they are welcome to DM me.) The《等级划分》do not discuss any sort of "stress levels" other than the basic five tones. 刘英林, co-editor of the《等级划分》and first author of the (Liu et al. 2020) paper, was the first director of the 北京语言大学和国家汉办汉语水平考试中心 and one of the co-creators of the original HSK test in the nineties. I wonder what sort of palace intrigue led to the《等级划分》getting shelved for the last ten years? Roddy is right on the money. As described in the《等级划分》preface, the overall process for compiling the lists at each level was (1) compare some character frequency lists to pick a list of 900 characters for that level, (2) compare a bunch of word frequency lists to pick a list of words that were exclusively composed of the characters included so far, then (3) compile a list of syllables that you'd need to pronounce all the characters.
  3. 7 points
    Hey all, if anyone out there is addicted to watching home makeovers, as I am, you might enjoy this Guangdong-based show, 五金少女, wǔjīn shàonǚ, English: Hardware Girls. It is two craftsy girls, who do low-budget, realistic home makeovers for ordinary young Chinese. The show features some seriously tiny homes, like, a young couple who live in a 15 squaremeter hutong home, a bachelor who has the insane luxury of having a staggering 20 squaremeter condo for his own, etc. The episodes even include building cat balconies! I think the show gives a fascinating realistic insight into the lives of ordinary Chinese and their apartments. And it is great for learning pretty useful vocabulary you might need if you spend time renting in China (screwdriver, electric wires, fixing cracks in the walls, etc.). The 五金少女's channel on Youtube: https://youtu.be/W26ZNZ23c2o
  4. 7 points
    Frankly, I've been waiting for a revision of the test since Hanban introduced the actual format in 2010. The HSK test, even at the highest levels (HSK 5 and 6), is so simple that the equivalence HSK 6=C1 is impossibile to accept. The table for HSK 2020 seems to take into account that at the elementary level a learner need to know 2500 words, at the intermediate level 5000/6000 words, at the advanced level 10.000 words. Now I hope to see in the text more extracts from university textbooks for chinese students, modern literature, magazines, essays, real spoken chinese (media, interviews etc.), and maybe, at the advanced level, classical grammatical structures used today in formal Chinese. 🙂 🙂
  5. 7 points
    As the title shows, I am a native Chinese and currently study Linguistics, and both Chinese and English translation at the postgraduate level. I found this forum via Google Search and it was listed as the first result, which convinced me that this must be the most pupolar one. The reason for creating an account and posting something is to encourage myself to learn more about both English and Chinese, because I need to use English language and knowledge to solve your problems and describe Chinese langauge and knowledge. In my own words, this experience will be like a field trip, in which I can come across lots of questions that may not puzzle native learner while really cause many difficulties for foreign learners. That is simply my original intention. As for myself, I grew up with reading a number of Chinese literatures, which vary from classic ones to contemporary ones, because I very appreciate the ability of learning life experience from those books. Besides, since I am studying Linguistics, I pay much attention to the usage of languages, that is, English and Chinese. If you are familiar with this subject, I am a functionalist and believe that there are numerous ambiguities and impreciseness during the process of using langauge. Thus, those real-world questions from you may become the key to explain some linguistic phenomenon. In this way, please don't hesitate to ask me questions about either Chinese Linguistics or Literature. I will be very grateful for this mutual learning. By the way, if this post is in the wrong section, please tell me where I can post for more attention. Much Thanks.
  6. 6 points
    I recently published the 50th post on the Chinese Lyrics Challenge blog, so I thought I might be qualified to write a brief guide on how to do a large amount of translations if you're doing it as a hobbie rather than a profession. I'm not going to go into a ton of detail, because if I try to write everything down, it'll take forever and I'll never finish. If you're curious about something, feel free to ask questions in the comments. As a bit of background, the Lyrics Challenge blog is only concerned with translating the lyrics from Chinese songs to idiomatic English. It's not a playlist of the songs I like the most, rather, it's meant to be a list of songs whose lyrics I find interesting. I prefer songs that have a storyline, evocative imagery, or both. Most of the songs on the blog are specific enough that they cannot be confused with any other song. The checklist below is specific to lyrics translation, but the overall process should apply to any kind of translation. The first step is to pick the right songs (lyrics) to translate. I don't care if a song has the best melody, but it better not be too grating because I'll be listening to it many times. I really don't like lyrics with a lot of abstract wording. This causes the space of possible translations to explode and just fries my brain. The best choice is a song whose general meaning you understand, but there are several lines that you don't quite understand. I discover new songs to translate mostly by checking my YouTube feed and following the hot songs playlist on StreetVoice. Get the lyrics. Usually this is pretty easy, just do a search in Google. However, often you have to convert from traditional to simplified. There's actually no really good service I found to do this, but I use this one because it's less bad than others: https://www.purpleculture.net/traditional-simplified-converter/ (but I still have to manually replace 著 with 着). Proofread the lyrics. It's common for lyrics you get from the internet to contain typos and very often they will contain grammar mistakes. I try to fix as many of these as I can before I start the actual translation process. I convert the lyrics document to a table in Notion (a fancy wiki site). The table columns are Chinese, English, and Annotation. Each line gets its own row. I actually tried a lot of sites besides Notion, but it won out in the end because it's easy to share with collaborators and the mobile app works well enough (it has a lot of problems, but other apps were worse). It's a lot of manual work to do the conversion from plain text to table, so I wrote a Python script to automate the process. Now the translation actually begins. I'll occasionally translate an entire song in one go, but typically it happens in spurts. Most of the translations are written through the Notion app on my phone. Sometimes I'll only do a single stanza or even a single line before putting it down to attend to some other business. A lot of times, I'll force myself to write something, anything, even if I know it's wrong. There will be plenty of opportunities to fix mistakes during the review process. For me, the translation process is a marathon, not a sprint. Better to spend 10 minutes on it each day rather than 70 minutes once a week. This is especially true when a translation requires a lot of dictionary and thesaurus lookups, which fry my brain rather quickly. After the initial draft is done, it's time to review. However, I prefer to let some time pass before starting review. This gives your subconscious mind some time to mull over the lines you wrote. It's better to start another translation rather than start a review immediately after finishing the first draft. Once review starts, I'll go back and carefully examine each line. Sometimes my mistakes will be obvious, other times I'm not sure so I add some notes in the Annotation column. If you want to produce translations of a decent quality, you must have editors. I schedule a weekly call with some friends who grew up in China and I read out each line in Chinese while they check the line's English translation on Notion. They suggest edits on the spot and one of the nice things about Notion is that when I change the document, it updates in real-time for everyone viewing the document. Some additional grammar issues in the original lines are fixed at this stage. Now it's time for another review! Yes, even though the editors already went over it, it's possible that they only pointed out problems but weren't able to come up with good solutions. Usually it's a problem with phrasing. Something that is easy to express in Chinese can be devilishly hard to communicate in non-mangled English. The last step is to publish the translation. I also semi-automate the process with a different script, this time converting the Notion table to HTML that can be posted in the blog editor on this site. One of the reasons the script saves so much time is that it allows me to only write one translated line for a line that repeats multiple times. I only go through the publishing process once every few months, because I do a lot of them at once and then schedule them to be published at the rate of once a week for the next few months. I think that's a good summary, so I'll stop here. This describes the general workflow that I follow now. Occasionally the process is a little different, for example if the lyrics can't be found anywhere and I have to transcribe them myself. If you have any suggestions for how I could improve the workflow I've described here, I'd love to hear them. P.S. There are 50 posts published so far, but there are currently 7 more scheduled to be published in the coming months. And about 50 more translations that are in various stages of the translation pipeline. My goal is do about 100 translations, which will take about 2 years in total. If I maintain the current rate of publishing, I should reach that goal by August 2021.
  7. 6 points
  8. 5 points
    Well, let's update. Chinese-related goals: - Read more popular Dutch books. I read a few and then it kind of came to a halt. Need to pick this up again. Currently reading Barbara Tuchman and Henry James, who are neither currently popular nor Dutch. - Read more Chinese literature, both novels and short stories. This was going pretty well (I read 3 books in 3 months during lockdown), slowed down in the last two months, because... - Publish something Chinese literature in translation. I got a new book to translate (hurray!!!), for a major Dutch publisher, by a great Chinese author. I was diligently reading Chinese books, learning new vocab and writing stuff in Dutch about Chinese literature, and all that slowed down as now I have paid work yay. And in general: - Take good care of myself and feel good & happy. This is going all right, but remains an area I need to constantly pay attention to.
  9. 5 points
    I've actually ended up doing more actual Chinese study this last month or two than for years. Started when I decided it was time to formalise my knowledge of traditional characters a bit - I can read them fine, and probably at the same speed as simplified, my original character set - but I'd never really looked at them in any systematic way. So downloaded an Anki deck and rattled through that without too much bother. But while doing that I realised that (unsurprisingly) after maybe ten years of doing WAY more reading than anything else, my pronunciation knowledge had got sloppy. Too many "is that -uan or 'uang' ?" ; "wait, second tone?" and "Oh, you have three different pronunciations, you sneaky little....?" moments. So I figured a comprehensive review was necessary and have been running through HSK list flashcards on Pleco. 100 new cards a day seems to stabilise at about 20-30 minutes of reviews a day, which is entirely manageable and I'm getting enough of them wrong, or getting them right only with thought, that it feels useful.
  10. 5 points
    The Poetry and Prose of Wang Wei, translated by Paul Rouzer has just been published. https://www.degruyter.com/view/mvw/PPWW-B This is the first complete translation of Wang Wei's extant works, and the latest issue in publishers' DeGruyter series Library of Chinese Humanities. The texts are in English and Chinese (getting them side by side takes some manouvering but it's worth it). As previous issues in the series, the pdf and epub versions are Open Access. ♥️♥️♥️ The full list of previous and planned volumes is here: https://www.degruyter.com/view/serial/LOCH-B?contents=toc-59654 This is very especially valued in a year when good news are hard to come by.
  11. 5 points
    Adding a corpus feature is a long-standing issue and probably the next major feature I'll tackle. Adding timed movement is a much easier feature and something I could probably add more quickly - though no promises yet. Interesting piece of trivia: "Chinese Text Analyser" started life as "Chinese Speed Reader" and it got everything implemented except the speed reading part, at which point I decided to just release the analyser part first and then come back and do the speed reader later, but have never had the time to do so.
  12. 5 points
    I had my test today. I found it challenging in places especially as in the past few weeks my active and passive exposure to Mandarin has dropped off considerably these last few weeks. My Mandarin is pretty basic as rated by myself. As explained later by @Lusimonia , the test probes your ability in using the language. It was a bit of a surprise to find out that I am intermediate ability and some vocabulary that I use touches on advanced level. However, I feel that I don't have the necessary range of vocabulary to be truly intermediate. After the test finished, we had a discussion on our experiences of language learning which was nice. The test was good for me for generating self motivation. It comes at an appropriate time as social restrictions are being increased quickly in HK.
  13. 5 points
    I just had an email from my employer suggesting that the process for our overseas staff to return to Hangzhou is about to start, and it looks like it will involve getting antibody and nucleic acid tests done before departure (good luck with that anyone in the UK — including me!) and then quarantining in a hotel for 14 days on arrival. Plus in my case applying for a Z-visa all over again, because mine expired in June before I even got to enter the country. Oh, the anticipation...
  14. 5 points
    Some online dictionaries offer this feature. MDBG online dictionary has a tiny button with a >> symbol between the character and its definition. Press it and it will lead you to several options to learn more about the character, including one to pull example sentences from jukuu. There's also Yellow Bridge, rarely if ever mentioned in these forums. The site has been going on for years but is still well maintained and its content seems to be updated and expanded quite regularly, enough to be worth a visit. There's a pay subscription version (gets rid of advertising and offers additional goodies), but the free version includes all the main content and basic functions. The Chinese/English dictionary : https://www.yellowbridge.com/chinese/dictionary.php gives a lot of information, including examples, thesaurus (a variable amount of information, but often something useful to know), etymology, lists of compounds (not comprehensive but reasonably detailed). The Subscription version also has Derived Words and Similar Sounding Words. And I only just noticed, the dictionary page has a very useful list of Words in The News on the right hand side, among the ads. There's always something new to find in Yellowbridge
  15. 5 points
    Has anybody here ever used the Common Voice dataset for their language studies? They released an update last week and the Mandarin Chinese parts of the dataset now have a total of about 140 hours of recorded sentences for China and Taiwan. From Wikipedia: I immediately thought of the MorphMan add-on for Anki when I read about this update (paging @NinKenDo), though not having English translations for these sentences is a limitation. About 15% of the sentences are tagged with the speaker's birthplace. Perhaps this dataset could be used to find good examples of regional accents? Some example sentences from the corpus are below. 宋朝末年年间定居粉岭围。 渐渐行动不便 二十一年去世。 他们自称恰哈拉。 局部干涩的例子包括有口干、眼睛干燥、及阴道干燥。 嘉靖三十八年,登进士第三甲第二名。 这一名称一直沿用至今。 为了惩罚西扎城和塞尔柱的结盟,盟军在抵达后将外城烧毁。 河内盛产黄色无鱼鳞的鳍射鱼。 他主要演出泰米尔语电影。 福崎町是位于日本兵库县中部的行政区划。 下行月台设有厕所。 耶尔河畔圣伊莱尔人口变化图示 光绪八年再中举人。 赫拉克勒斯是希腊神话中的半神英雄。 蔡声白。 该区舰队主要负责为公海舰队的战列分舰队提供屏护。 雷诺在回归的第一年比赛中以第四名的成绩完成了比赛。 这样都可以啊 此原理也广泛应用于家庭之中用于生产软水。 本片的导演是赵秀贤和梁铉锡。 奥特拉德诺耶农村居民点是俄罗斯联邦沃罗涅日州新乌斯曼区所属的一个农村居民点。 吉内斯塔。
  16. 5 points
    I went to search the source text and tried to get some hints from its context. And then I would like share my thoughts. This part of the story happened at the beginning of the marriage of the author's parents. Although the author's grandpa on her mother's side disagreed with his daughter's marriage with her father, they finally got married. After the marriage, the grandma on her mother's side and her mother's elder brother brought a few things (including this 年糕面) visited some relatives in Jinan. I think your opinion is correct because nobody will bring some noodles to visit others. However, the time of this story happening is also important for figuring out what 年糕面 is. In my opinion, I may say it is the flour used to make 年糕. The reason is that at that time (around 1976), these ingredients like flour, rice and meat were very short because they are allocated a fixed amount. For example, there were five people (2 adults and 3 children) in your family, you may have a little amount that was just enough for your family. Therefore, if you bring a bag of flour to visit your relatives, it means your home has stored some food. Then, you can imagine how close you and your relatives are and how rich and powerful your family is (LOL). Does it make sense?
  17. 4 points
    1. 请您离开时带走所有剩余食物,以免野猪误食感染病毒 2. 请您离开时带走所有剩余食物,野猪误食后会将病毒传染给人类 Both two phrases are translated literally without considering their stylistic requirements. If you need a refinded version, I can retranslate them later.
  18. 4 points
    There are many Chinese Americans who claim Cantonese as their family language, but often it’s actually Taishanese (台山话), a closely related topolect. 婆婆 can also mean maternal grandmother in Mandarin, mostly in the south of China, e.g. Shanghai and surrounding areas.
  19. 4 points
    Hi! I am writing to let you know that I am currently offering free ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) OPI(Oral Proficiency Interview) practice opportunities. I am in the process of getting my ACTFL OPI Tester Certification. If you are not familiar with OPI, here is a brief description directly quoted from ACTFL Testing Office: OPI: The ACTFL Oral Proficiency Interview, or OPI, is a live 20-30 minute conversation, taking place over the phone, between a trained, certified ACTFL tester and the candidate. It is a valid and reliable test that measures how well a person speaks a language. The procedure is standardized in order to assess global speaking ability, measuring language production holistically by determining patterns of strengths and weaknesses. At the end of the OPI practice test, a rating on your oral proficiency level will be provided following the ACTFL testing protocol and professional standards. Please note that the given rating is neither an advisory rating nor an official rating. If you need an official ACTFL OPI rating, your rating needs to be blindly double rated by an ACTFL Certified Tester under the supervision of the ACTFL Testing Office. Notice only ACTFL, through the ACTFL Testing Office, may issue an Official ACTFL OPI Rating and Certificate. Nevertheless, this practice test will provide you a good opportunity to familiarize yourself with the OPI procedure and practice your spoken Chinese with a native speaker. Also, at the end of the practice interview, I will share my feedback on the strengths and weaknesses of your Chinese and provide my suggestions and advice. If you are interested in taking this OPI practice test, please feel free to contact me by replying to this post.
  20. 4 points
    Yeah, support for that iPad multi-instance mode is on a long list of Stuff That We Really Didn't Want To Implement Twice In Our Old And New Apps, but it should be supported in 4.0 at whatever point hopefully at least a few years prior to the heat death of the sun that finally comes out.
  21. 4 points
    Dependant on you but -75 RMB (Canteen basic food) - 150 RMB (more flexible) per day on food -Cleaning products and essentials on arriving 300RMB - Student Bar on weekends? 250 RMB per weekend - Travelling one weekend every month? 500 - 3000RMB per weekend travelled - Paying for 1 on 1 tutoring 2 hours per week? 200 RMB per week - Travelling to SLT and buying clothes once per month? 500RMB per month - Going to cinema? 80 RMB - Going to watch Beijing play football 300 RMB - Trip on subway ? 4 RMB - Buying an ebike? 1000- 2000 RMB - Buying a bicyle? 250-1000 RMB - 1 nice restaurant meal with friends per weekend? 200 RMB - getting a haircut? 30 RMB - 500RMB - getting a blind massage? 60 RMB - getting a swedish massage ? 300 RMB - acupuncture? 200 RMB - 350 ml of coke? 4 RMB Food and travel are you biggest variables - are you gonna enjoy yourself and try restaurants often, or will you just eat basically at the canteen. Also travel - will you make opportunity to visit Xian and Shanghai etc? or stay at home P.S whatever you budget for - you will probably spend about 25% more. China, and particularly Beijing, is increasing in living price
  22. 4 points
    The suggestions of using the dictionary provided examples may be convenient but I think actually work against some of the benefits of @Jan Finster doing the leg work and finding the sentences through google: 1) Phrases in the wild will naturally be more authentic; 2) The process of searching will help her (him?) get used to scanning Chinese for what he is looking for. Incidentally, a skill that is also important for HSK 5 and 6. Additionally, Research from Laufer and others have shown that vocabulary acquisition can be strengthened when the learner needs to search for the vocab in some way; 3) Greater context provided from the webpage on which the phrase is found. Isolated dictionary sentences are still divorced from context and can make it difficult to determine the level of formality being used.
  23. 4 points
    Ha! This was really useful. I hadn't realised Word could do the conversion, but it's done a much better job than whatever was used to create the file I was given. Daft of me. Headache over, I think.
  24. 4 points
    戴口罩 Wear a mask Seal script 篆書
  25. 4 points
    @roddy and @Tomsima, the book has reached me, thank you so much! I'll start it right now, trying to keep on with 笛安's novel.
  26. 3 points
    骎骎 - swiftly, like a galloping horse. I did once try to use that in conversation with a Dalian taxi driver, but he just gave me a kiss.
  27. 3 points
    隐秘的角落 The Bad Kids (2020) - Full Series (12 Episodes) I've added subs for this show. I really enjoyed watching it so I'm glad there are subs available. I've uploaded them to the drive and will update the main page of the project shortly. @BaneGlory This time I've uploaded as an Excel spreadsheet (a new sheet for each episode), including timestamps for each line so they are easy to find. I thought about getting the English subs and putting them alongside but it's a a little labour intensive. If anybody wants this and is willing to help with a bit of the grunt work (probably no more than 20-30 minutes work) just let me know.
  28. 3 points
    I spent a fair bit of time scouring the Web looking for openly licensed / freely available resources in order to make HanBaoBao, my language learning/assistance app. Here I want to share some of those resources with others. Note that they are not all free or usably licensed. If you have other resources, please contribute I'm far from a professional. My Chinese isn't even good - I'm very new to the language. Dictionary Data: CC-CEDICT (https://cc-cedict.org/wiki/) - this is the main dictionary used by most free dictionary apps, it's very good. Adso (https://github.com/wtanaka/adso) - another free dictionary (check the license). I believe it's primarily intended for machine translation and not human consumption. Particularly good for Part-of-speech (PoS) tagging information. Nan Tien Institute (NTI) Buddhist Dictionary (https://github.com/alexamies/buddhist-dictionary). Based on CC-CEDICT, but adds many PoS tags, definitions, topics, & categories. For example: 19897 美式咖啡 \N Měishì kāfēi cafe Americano set phrase 饮料 Beverage 饮食 Food and Drink \N \N \N \N \N 19897 Unihan (http://www.unicode.org/charts/unihan.html & http://www.unicode.org/reports/tr38/) - The Unihan database produced by The Unicode Consortium provides brief English definitions (note that it contains only character data, no words made of more than one character) but is more commonly used as a character reference and contains information such as stroke counts, simplified <-> traditional mappings, pinyin, and dictionary cross-references. StarDict Dictionaries (http://download.huzheng.org/zh_CN/) - Even though the site claims that these dictionaries are GPL, I doubt it. Be wary of these. Lingoes Dictionaries (http://www.lingoes.net/en/dictionary/index.html) - I cannot vouch for the license for any of these dictionaries. Wiktionary (https://dumps.wikimedia.org/zhwiki/latest/ for dumps) - Wiktionary is only semi-structured data and therefore would require some processing to make it useable as a translation dictionary. Linguistic Data Consortium (LDC) Chinese-English Translation Lexicon (https://catalog.ldc.upenn.edu/LDC2002L27) - I don't believe that this dictionary is freely useable, but it's worth noting its existence. A List of Chinese Names (http://technology.chtsai.org/namelist/) - This list of over 700K unique chinese names was compiled from the Joint College Entrance Examination (JCEE) in Taiwan. I'm not certain how representative the names are of the greater Chinese population, but it may be useful information regardless. CC-Canto (cantonese.org) Linguistic Data Consortium (LDC) Chinese-to-English & English-to-Chinese Wordlists (https://github.com/ReubenBond/LdcChineseWordlists originally from https://web.archive.org/web/20130107081319/http://projects.ldc.upenn.edu/Chinese/LDC_ch.htm) Sentence Examples: Tatoeba (https://tatoeba.org/eng/downloads) - I haven't actually put the Tatoeba sentences to good use yet. To be honest there are quite a few which would need filtering & touching up. Some sentences are just strange, some are quite vulgar, some seem to be extracts from books, but most are earnest & good. Jukuu (http://www.jukuu.com/help/hezuo.htm) - Has a large data set, but it only accessible as a Web service as far as I'm aware. They seem to be open to collaborative partnerships, however. Audio: Projet Schtooka (http://shtooka.net/index.php) - Online collection of pronunciations for many thousands of words in multiple languages, including over 9000 Chinese words. Forvo (http://forvo.com/languages/zh/) - Forvo is paid Speak Good Chinese (http://www.speakgoodchinese.org/wordlists.html) - Farily small data set of pronounciations for individual syllables. HSK & Other Word Lists: Popup Chinese (http://www.popupchinese.com/hsk/test) hskhsk.com (http://www.hskhsk.com/word-lists.html) Wiktionary: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Appendix:HSK_list_of_Mandarin_words TOCFL Word list (http://www.sc-top.or...sh/download.php) Word/Character Frequency & Corpus: Word & Character frequency data is useful for performing text segmentation (中文分词), like in HanBaoBao. Text segmentation will never be 100% accurate, particularly when performed on a mobile device. Therefore you will most likely want to include some option to show users the alternatives. In HanBaoBao users can tap a word multiple times to split it or join it with its neighbors (but only if there's a dictionary definition for that word). The way this works internally is by 'banning' the span of characters which you tap. Once all possibilities are banned, I remove all the bans and the cycle repeats. I use a weighted directed acyclic graph of the valid segmentation paths through the sentence and determine the most probable sentence based on that graph (removing the 'banned' spans). In order to speed things up (it's a slow process), I pre-split the input on punctuation and process each split separately. This could be optimized more, but it's within the acceptable performance bounds for now. Frequency data also helps sorting definitions so that the most relevant definitions come first. The well established dictionary apps almost certainly do a better job in the relevance department and I haven't put much work into that yet. Worth noting that much of this data cannot be trusted to be accurate, since often text segmentation software is used to segment each corpus, so there's potential for a positive feedback loop. Open Subs 2016 data set (http://opus.lingfil.uu.se/OpenSubtitles2016.php) - A huge corpus of auto-segmented subtitles (~8Gbs uncompressed xml) Leiden Weibo Corpus (http://lwc.daanvanesch.nl/openaccess.php) Jun Da (http://lingua.mtsu.edu/chinese-computing/) Jieba Analysis (https://github.com/huaban/jieba-analysis) - I'm not sure where their data comes from. Lancaster Corpus of Mandarin Chinese (http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/fass/projects/corpus/LCMC/) Chinese WordNet (http://lope.linguistics.ntu.edu.tw/cwn2/) SIGHAN Second International Chinese Word Segmentation Bakeoff (http://www.sighan.org/bakeoff2005/) - Contains hand-segmented/verified texts (thanks to Imron) SUBTLEX-CH (http://www.ugent.be/...ents/subtlexch/) Character Composition/Data: Make Me a Hanzi (https://skishore.github.io/makemeahanzi/) - very cool stroke animation tool & data. Wikipedia (https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Commons:Chinese_characters_decomposition) CJKLib (https://github.com/cburgmer/cjklib) Unihan (see above) - Contains some character composition information, such as stroke counts CJKDecomp (http://cjkdecomp.codeplex.com/) Miscellaneous Remembering Simplified Hanzi (https://github.com/rouseabout/heisig) Let me know if I've missed any useful data. I'd love to find similar resources for other languages, or E-C instead - so if you have any, please let me know
  29. 3 points
    Disclaimer: This write up is not a guide on how to type using Cangjie, check out the wiki page for a basic intro if you're interested. This is aimed at anyone who simply wants to know whether learning a new input method is or is not worth the time investment. 2020 has been a very strange year for me, as I'm sure it has for most of us. With all the extra time, I decided to get down to some things that I've wanted to do for a while but...just never had the time. One of those things was learning to type Cangjie both fast enough that I can use it for live conversation on Wechat, and for practicing my character retention abilities. There are a number of shape-based input methods for Chinese out there, the most famous being Cangjie (倉頡), Dayi (大易) and Zhengma (鄭碼) for traditional, and Wubi (五笔) for simplified. I chose to learn Cangjie as it is well suited for typing both traditional and simplified, which can't be said of most other shape-based methods (most are now able to some extent, but mainly rely on 'conversion' rather than directly typing in the specific character according to its structure). Thats not to say Cangjie is 'the best' of these systems, its just the one that suited my needs the most. Other benefits of Cangjie are that it is widely available and license-free, so no worries that it will suddenly disappear or require some payment to use. It also uses a lot less keys than methods such as Dayi, so less finger stretching. Regardless, I believe Cangjie is an incredibly well-designed system, a real work of genius that functions to break down computer-font characters in the same way stroke order helps with handwriting characters. After 6 months of practice I have racked up just close to 100 hours of typing practice on anki (typing out sentences from memory based on prompts). I can now reach around 25-30cpm. I type at around 60-70wpm in English, so I've still got a long way to go, but I'm happy with my progress as it stands. Here's what I've found is important on my journey: 1. Your keyboard keys affect how a shape-based input method helps with character retention I originally set out using normal keys with alphanumeric symbols. I learned to touch type fairly quickly in Cangjie, but found that I began to see characters as strings of English letters in my head, a little like how when you're typing in pinyin you often think of the romanised version of what you're writing before the image of the character floats into your mind. This became quite annoying and counterconstructive, so I got some Cangjie stickers from ebay and stuck them on blank keycaps to see what difference there might be. The difference was noticeable immediately, as I began to associate the keys with Chinese characters much quicker. However, I still found that with some of the more difficult keys (where the character and the element it could represent are connected in a fairly abstract way), my brain would start remembering the string of keys for the character instead of properly decomposing it into its elements. The brain always chooses the easiest option I guess. A good example of this would be 麼, where 戈 represents both 广 and 丶 in the decomposition, with 女 also representing the stroke 𡿨, it was just easier to remember 麼=戈木女戈, or even just the shape the keys made on the keyboard. So I decided to make a set of keys similar to the ones you see for 五笔, where every single symbol is listed on the keycaps (ive seen them for 鄭碼 too, probably because the amount you need to remember for it is too much of a burden on the brain). I should emphasise, I decided to use this keyboard specifically for the purposes of character retention. If I wanted raw speed I would just use blank keycaps and rely on muscle memory. This keyboard has had a massive effect on how Cangjie has helped with remembering character writing, and if anyone is interested I'll be happy to send on the inkscape file. Now when I look at my keyboard to type 麼 I can actually look for 广 - 木 (-木) -𡿨-厶 instead of remembering some arbitrary code or pattern. Think that looks scary? Its not, it is very intuitive and can be learnt in half an hour of typing I would estimate. Check out 徐碼 for a typing system that has a single code for every single character you could possibly type. Bet you like the look of that Cangjie keyboard now: 2. Cangjie 5 is a massive improvement on Cangjie 3. Microsoft Cangjie is riddled with errors. I first set out using Cangjie probably around 2 years ago, but it was only really out of curiousity and I only used it on my phone. I didnt realise it at the time but I was using the 3rd generation of the system (for reference, 1 and 2 were largely just glorified betas). Then when I moved onto using cangjie on my laptop (ms surface), I discovered that many of the codes were different, despite it still being classed as Cangjie 3. Thankfully I came across this fantastic wikibook which not only explained the errors that MS has made in its own hacky version of Cangjie (after parting ways with the creator of Cangjie), but also showed how the 5th generation of Cangjie had corrected all the weird decomposition errors and inconsistencies in Cangjie 3. I immediately switched to Cangjie 5 and have not looked back, it is internally consistent and logical throughout. I strongly recommend any future students of Cangjie to use Cangjie 5, it is a pleasure to type with and really feels like you're writing characters, just like that feeling you get when you type English and your thoughts seem to just 'appear' on the screen - there is no feeling of detachment. Here are some notes I made when I first made the switch from MS Cangjie 3 to Cangjie 5 (using 倉頡平台) Correction of character selection order based on frequency. Eg 致 before 玫,知 before 佑. Damn that ms input was annoying, always having to add in '2' after so many common characters. recognition of 尸 as representative of the double dot, eg 假 人口尸水 應:戈人土心 this is fantastic, finally the parts are separated properly! 篼 has been corrected to 竹竹女山 (instead of 竹竹尸弓, which breaks away from the treatment of 兜 as a single unit (both in 3 and 5) 撐 and 撑 have their own unique codes (another MS error, typing 牙 here gives you 手...) 木廿 来 大木 东 etc the list goes on... I encourage anyone thats interested in comparing the differences between CJ 3 and 5 to have a look at this list. In fact, browse through the whole book, its incredibly well written. (Written by the 'boss'? of 倉頡之友, a forum without which I would never have found any success in learning 倉頡). 3. Cangjie is really fun to type with If you've ever felt the frustration of having to cycle through pages of characters to find the one you want, hate typing out whole words then delete the parts you don't want, or if you just can't stand 联系and 练习 causing all your friends to question what on earth you've been doing with all those hours of Chinese study, then Cangjie is defintely worth a try (or any other shape-based input method for that matter). Once you get used to typing using a shape-based method, you realise just how annoying typing phonetically is. Yes, I get it, its very, very, very easy to learn, and it means you don't have to remember how to write characters, only recognise them. But if you are at all interested in writing Chinese, then try Cangjie (or Wubi if you're simplified only gang) and I'm sure you'll never look back. There is nothing more satisfying than seeing an obscure character and being able to check it instantaneously in your dictionary. I still remember the first time I saw 鑾 and realised it was just three keys right next to each other (女火金), the pure satisfaction... Here is an update video of me typing from today:https://youtu.be/DaZ9QRSKTbc I drafted a short paragraph then recorded myself typing it back out. There are errors, and its pretty slow going, but still, shows where I am honestly at after 6 months. Hope some of this helps, and if you've got any questions let me know and I'll try and help out
  30. 3 points
    There are some good news regarding coming back to China. Seems that the government is planning to let some people back in by renewing the visa application in certain countries. So far I heard about South Korea, Pakistan, South Africa and Thailand, not sure how it will work with other countries (here's one link: https://en.yna.co.kr/view/AEN20200727006500325). Also, can't quite say how it will work, whether people who are not nationals of a given country can also get the visa (like me, being stuck in Korea) and how exactly would that coming back looking like. But it's a step in a good direction nonetheless and good news for people like me, sitting on pins and needles waiting to be let back in
  31. 3 points
    Looks to be a random list of virtues, including a couple where it's two characters squeezed together. It's in full form but I'm using simplified characters, from top: 义 https://www.zdic.net/hans/义 礼 https://www.zdic.net/hans/礼 勇 https://www.zdic.net/hans/勇 名誉 https://www.zdic.net/hans/名誉 仁 https://www.zdic.net/hans/仁 真 https://www.zdic.net/hans/真 忠义 https://www.zdic.net/hans/忠义
  32. 3 points
    Ok reason i ask is this. 1) If the personal reasons are you met a person who you love, and have been swept of your feet and are just desperate to get there ASAP and so have not really prepared much, or investigated. Then in truth you will overcome all the work difficulties and cultural differences that are thrown at you (because you have a personal driver). And so people on here will happily help you answer your questions(or something similar) 2) if the personal reasons are because you decided you want to find a high paying job. Even if you know all of the differences before hand, and even if you can find said job. The novelty, and more importantly motivation (to live in China) will wear off (because you have no link to china) I hesitate to add this, because perhaps your not this at all, but sometimes i see posts in this format - i know nothing about china, mandarin, industry's that are hiring there, the culture, the differences, the visa system, the bureaucracy, the food, the housing conditions.... but i've decided i want to go because life is too short, so please help me. Although its a noble concept, in reality, life doesn't work like that. Its actually more of a favour to say, some of these things (not all) you should know already yourself, because your interest is serious. For example you would have already enrolled on a beginners mandarin class, or you would have googled yourself the work holidays in China and know they are less than the UK. That being said here are some answers - I believe you have a good chance in a number of industries with only english. Particularly in tier 1 cities, your colleagues will have good command of english, and they wont be hiring you based on your mandarin ability. There are many foerginers in Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou who work comfortably with little to no Mandarin. - The working culture is more demanding than the UK. (on average) Longer hours, less holidays and less pay (Chinese companies). You are also expected to commit more time to work social events (think monthly meals and KTV). Also the standard of HR is not yet an equivalent level as the UK. - It hard to judge, but if i were pushed, i would say people are more stressed in China. The workload is higher. Although they do have a stronger sense of a brighter future, and so in that sense, with a growing economy, and positive news, they are less stressed.
  33. 3 points
    老鼠药?I am guessing the second character from the context since there are two dead mice hanging there.
  34. 3 points
    I'm currently going through the 'returning to China from UK' process. I have my flight booked with BA from London to Shanghai (the approved routes that were released yesterday) for 20 August, so ill report about the covid testing process closer to the time.
  35. 3 points
    I agree with @Dlezcano it appears to mean"washed-away river bend" which strikes you as a feature you might note. ETA and now I agree with @roddy too. Great Harmony is achieved.
  36. 3 points
    If you're flying into China, you're now going to need a negative PCR test taken within five days before departure, and taken at a Chinese-approved lab. http://www.china.org.cn/china/2020-07/21/content_76296482.htm
  37. 3 points
    I had that exact same sofa medieval torture device. That's a really good idea for some listening practice. I often think a neglected, but very useful, area of language, is... physical manipulation, for want of a better term. "Twist the cap while holding in the two catches", that kind of thing. We have a catio. It's lovely, and occasionally they even use it.
  38. 3 points
    If there's one thing I think I've learned over years of trying to learn and speak a few foreign languages, it's never get into a discussion like this with a native speaker. This isn't a matter of "qualifications." It's the way he speaks, and it sounds like he speaks just like quite a few other people in China. Would you always expect an English teacher from the U.K. to speak with BBC diction? I'd say you have your answer. Why raise it with him again? If you don't like his "accent," then just get another teacher. But don't try to show him you're right and he's wrong. Hopeless.
  39. 3 points
    This sounds like a great method, especially if your goal is to develop the ability to write in a specific style (e.g. scientific papers or technical documentation). If that isn't your goal then you will still benefit from reading all these usage examples you find in the wild. I don't know what your Chinese level is. If you aren't advanced then I'd suggest using the HSK word list or a word frequency listing to focus on the most common words first. Here's a graph I made with the SUBTLEX-CH word frequency listing. The first 5k most common words constitute >93% of the corpus. Don't go chasing after diminishing returns until you've picked all the low-hanging fruit. In addition to internet searches, you could also look through some of the corpora out there like the LCMC to find usage examples.
  40. 3 points
    For those that don't have Word, the free OpenOffice Writer can also do this.
  41. 3 points
    Not sure this will help you, but if at least one of your docs is a pdf (if not Word already), and you have Word/Office 2016 or 365, it's easy to convert the orientation to whatever you want, so at least you'll have both documents with the same orientation. Use 'Open with' to open your document with Word, save that copy as a docx file. Now you can edit it. Select 'Layout' from the ribbon menu and use the 'Text Direction' options on the left hand side. If working on paper and desperate, you can always OCR and convert.
  42. 3 points
    I passed HSK5 way back in 2015 so hopefully it won't take you as long as it took me to progress.
  43. 3 points
    @Milkybar_Kid not only did you pass, that's an unreal result for HSK 6 - no doubt hard earned! Congrats.
  44. 3 points
    Results from the 28 June exam are just out.... very relieved to have passed. My score is much higher than expected, actually. Can't believe I'm already working on HSK 5 with my teacher... although by the time I get through the textbooks it might not exist any more.
  45. 3 points
    Results of that online exam are allready out! I failed again, but failed better! 55% this time... last time I got over 60 in the ting li, must have reall made a mess of it this time lol , but last time only got 48% overall, , The global average for the exam was 203. Best of luck everyone! Ticket No. Test Subject Scores Average H52067646010100001 HSK五级 2020-06-28 写作 56.0 68.26 听力 53.0 71.67 阅读 56.0 63.34 Score 165.0 203.27
  46. 3 points
  47. 3 points
    I recently finished《北妹》(Northern Girls) by Sheng Keyi 盛可以 (what a fantastic nom-de-plume!), and it so happens that this week's translation challenge in Paper Republic is from the opening chapter. I thought it'd be an easy read, much of it was indeed easy, but it has an awful lot of 'specialised' vocabulary and in the end it took me a long time to get through, my Chinese vocabulary is no good for euphemisms. The introduction by Jack Hargreaves on Paper Republic and this earlier one by Eric Abrahamsen give more information. I liked it, it is a good antidote to the common portrayal of women as pretty doormats, saintly mothers or harrowing mothers-in-law in Chinese literature. The novel also contains a strong, though not on-your-face and quite entertaining, critique of the way women (especially young ones) are treated by society - a treatment that is by no means confined by China's borders. I think some of it will feel familiar to many women from everywhere in the world. I very much liked the way 'Northern Girls' central character, Qian Xiaohong, develops in the novel, she feels real rather than a stereotype. I like that she has a strong personality and a fierce willpower, but at the same time, she's no saint and she's quite undaunted by moral mores. She's a good fighter and loyal to her friends. There are several rather raunchy passages in the book, and also some very funny ones. I read 2/3 of the novel from a downloaded text, until, at the end of Chapter 8, I came upon a note saying that the publishers hoped we had enjoyed the novel but those who wanted to finish reading it l had to pay a small fee (I would of course have paid, but couldn't without a Chinese bank account). I read the last third of the book in Shelly Bryant's English Translation, which reads well and seems quite faithful to the original (though not as colourful in language, and a lot faster to read). Unfortunately Sheng Keyi seems to have fallen in disgrace (not surprisingly) and it's now quite difficult to find any of her novels either as e-books or tree-books from outside China. I want to read "Death Fugue", but will have to do it in translation.
  48. 3 points
    So, I've taken this course from start to finish. I'll leave my opinion here just in case someone wants to read a fair and detailed review in the future. I rate this course 4/5. The teachers seem nice, it's easy to follow, it doesn't take too much time, it almost doesn't stray away from HSK 4 vocabulary. It helped me. I recommend it. Now, the HSK 4 course from PKU also has its problems: 1) A few (indeed few) words taught are not HSK 4 level. Some 10~20 words in the whole course are HSK 3 level, HSK 5 level, or non-HSK words. No big problem, but it would sometimes confuse me as I'd try to keep track of how many words I still had to learn, and I wouldn't find some of the newly learnt words on my list, the official HSK vocabulary list. 2)The video lessons are short. You'll only be taught how to use each word in a single way, and you'll definitely have to complement your studies looking for more examples on your own, as most words can be used in more than a single way. Also, you won't be taught the difference between synonyms such as 准时, 及时, 按时, you'll have to look that up too. 3)The course basically doesn't help you with the writing part, there's very little information about it, but that's somewhat expected since it's a free online course; there's no one to correct your writing. 4)The last 4 weeks of the course were poorly designed. You won't learn anything new at this point, only do some exercises to practice what you learned on past weeks and listen to some explanations about how the test works. The problem is that watching the daily video lesson plus doing such exercises takes 15 minutes a day, which is too little. Everything you're supposed to do in those 4 weeks can easily be done in less than a week. I actually did it in 3 days. 5)There are no practice tests. Solving 5 questions feels a lot different from solving 100. You'll have to do the training by yourself to be truly prepared for the test. I did one practice exam every weekend. At first my results weren't that nice, but it helps to see the progress at least. 6)Not all HSK 4 words are taught. Actually, out of the 600 new words required for the test, 179 words are left out. A little bit too much. Some of them you probably already know, like 帅, some are better left ignored, like 传真, and some do appear in the middle of some exercises at some point in the course (and might be quickly mentioned by one of the teachers). Still, at least 100 words are left completely unexplained, most of which are pretty useful. I'll try to attach an Excel file to this post, it should contain all words that cannot be found in any word list in this course. HSK 4 - Missing Words (Coursera).xlsx Overall, the course is fine, it's worth your time, but you can't expect it to do everything for you.
  49. 3 points
    Just to let you know I received my new passport a few days back. Documents received 28 April Application being processed 12 May Application approved 24 June! Passport printed and sent 25 June. Through another group that I am in, a person in UK had sent their passport in and had it approved within 2days in the first week of June. 8 weeks for mine is mystifying though fortunately I am not needing to travel.
  50. 3 points
    What a strange season this has been. I'm not really sure what to write, as our whole semester has been online. I feel like I my improvement was minimal due to the online classes, and the format in which they came. Speaking was done as an interactive online class, and so that was actually not bad. But a lot of the other classes were prerecorded lectures, with a few questions to follow, in order to check that we had been listening. The hardest class we had was 文学,and I got next to nothing out of it, because it was basically a teacher talking at us for a couple of hours, without any interaction. I feel this class would have been really good if it was in person. A lot of class time I just spent reading and doing flashcards, so that I was at least getting some self study in. Overall this semester has been far from ideal, but I do feel there has been some small improvement at least, and was happy to get through 《三体》,which I will do my thesis on next year. As far as getting back to China goes, I have absolutely no idea (nor do I think anyone else really does) as to when/how this will happen. If the next semester starts online, I struggle to understand how we would be able to go back before it ends. The logistics of trying to switch from online classes to actual classes, while international students are all having to book flights to get back, along with going through a two week quarantine, just seems like too much of a headache. I imagine it would be much wiser to do it during a break. Anyway, not much to report this time unfortunately. We have our final 4 week semester now - today is the last day of class, then 2/3 pieces of homework/papers over the next 3 weeks before we finish for the summer. Watch this space to see what happens next!
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