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Showing content with the highest reputation since 03/14/2021 in all areas

  1. I could have hardly imagined the day, but 1200 pages later, I'm finally finishing the Three Body trilogy (Chinese edition) by Liu Cixin. I suppose it's been satisfying to read a critically acclaimed series in its original language, to feel each book getting progressively easier to read, and to grapple with ambitious, abstract scientific/philosophical ideas in a language that is foreign to me. By now, one would think I'm getting tired of Sci-Fi (and I am), but using the aid of the Chinese Text Analyzer tool, I've ranked the remainder of my library from easy to difficult (in terms of
    9 points
  2. I’m not an expert because I’m still around HSK 5 level and decided not to follow the HSK route anymore. I felt unmotivated after I finished HSK 4 because I couldn’t string simple sentences, couldn’t understand most of TV shows, podcast and unable to read native materials. My listening and reading have improved a lot in the last year and my speaking even though still awful but compared to where I was in 2019 has improved a little. I personally think apps and textbooks start to get redundant around this level because you want to be exposed to as much native materials (or close to) as possible as
    8 points
  3. Well first of all, everyone has their own learning preferences, so what works for one learner might not be good for another. I know some people will disagree, but I found it unhelpful to try and learn radicals first, or at least learning them on their own. They don't have consistent "translations" and knowing what they're called in Chinese isn't helpful unless maybe you're advanced. You can't actually use many of them on their own. I found that I became familiar with them over time... some of them are very common (part 2, part 3) and they are easy to recognise just th
    8 points
  4. The former domain hanban.org is now being redirected to http://www.chinese.cn/page/#/pcpage/mainpage in line with the general re-branding that's going on. Hanban is now "Center for Language Education and Cooperation", and who knows what's happening to Confucius Institutes after the disastrous last couple of years in terms of PR. I emailed all the CI centres in the UK (because I happened to have their email addresses) to ask them about what's happening, and here is the first response, from Lancaster.
    7 points
  5. I think this type of advice is helpful if and only if you've already learned the Chinese grammar patterns in question. Some relevant patterns here: Degree complement Expressing "even" with "lian" and "dou" Expressing "about to happen" with "le"
    7 points
  6. To improve my listening skills, I decided to listen to all TCB lessons. Starting with HSK 1 lessons (approx. 900) as extensive listening practice, I just completed all HSK 1 lessons in TCB. The great thing about TCB is that they do not cling to the HSK levels rigidly. So, even though the lessons were supposed to be HSK 1, all HSK 1 lessons combined contained about 2687 unique words and 1418 unique characters (see stats below). The great thing about listening to them was that they were really fairly easy, but almost every lesson had 1-2 words I did not know
    6 points
  7. Because releasing this information as a watermarked unsearchable PDF can only be interpreted as a direct challenge to our technical prowess, and some of us have work that we are looking for an excuse to procrastinate on.
    6 points
  8. I'm subscribed to about a dozen different Chinese YouTube channels, but my favorite, by far, is 李永乐老师. His content is extremely interesting and top-notch, and rather than simply build the subtitles directly into the video, he uses YouTube subtitles. That means that I can use the "Zhongwen Popup Chinese Dictionary" browser extension to hover my mouse over the subtitle text and get a quick translation of any words I don't know. Most other Chinese channels that I've seen don't really have that feature. That also means that when I want to practice without the subtitles, I can turn them off. It's p
    5 points
  9. I reckon the best teachers speak as quickly as they can get away with - so, fast enough to put the student slightly out of their comfort zone. But the teacher will always circle back to ensure comprehension of they key teaching points they're trying to make. That way the student learns from exposure to language at just the right level of difficulty (the brain gets and benefits from a real workout), and also learns the teaching points prepared for that day.
    5 points
  10. I am absolute breezing through 许三观卖血记. On page 100 and every word lookup has been just out of curiosity and not really necessary for me to follow the story. I'm sure this will be fleeting when I start my next novel but the confidence boost is nice after kinda forcing myself to finish a Wang Dulu novel earlier.
    4 points
  11. The first time you start reading a new author and genre, there will always be a hump of new, frequently used vocabulary that you need to get over. Once you do that things will get easier. Just remember that if it doesn’t (or if the hump is too large), it’s perfectly ok to put the book down and come back to it once you’ve got a few more novels under your belt. 三体 will still be there waiting for you. Ultimately you need to strike a balance that works for you between material you can read and material you want to read. The more reading you do, the larger the over
    4 points
  12. Just finished 草鞋湾, my third chinese novel. I was planning to follow @imron's advice to stick to simple books within my reach while I build up reading stamina, and read 草房子 as my next book. But due to some pressure from a Chinese friend, I am gonna give 三体 a shot instead... I have read the first two chapters so far, and while it definitely feels more difficult than 草鞋湾, it seems only so because of the science vocab that I don't know yet. Maybe these are just relatively easier chapters, I don't know yet but I am excited to continue, and hopefully it remains at the same difficulty l
    4 points
  13. Friday 9 April 14:00 – 15:00 BST Jia Pingwa: Master Storyteller of rural China Sponsored by Sinoist Books, with Prof. Christopher Payne* * whose English translation of Jia's novel 老生 is about to appear under the title The Mountain Whisperer (Sinoist Books, 2021) More about Jia Pingwa (贾平凹) with lists of his works: http://www.ugly-stone.com/ https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jia_Pingwa https://glli-us.org/2017/02/20/jia-pingwa-as-global-literature-by-nick-stember/
    4 points
  14. I'm not sure if this topic has come up before, but there seemed to be some interest recently when I described my own online lessons, so here goes... Teacher Shuo of the ShuoshuoChinese说说中文 youtube channel has been live streaming lessons with her students. Obviously this is a promotional exercise because she teaches online, but it's also interesting to sit in and watch/listen to compare with your own experience, especially if — like me — you've only ever studied Chinese online and 1:1. Here's today's live stream which I hope will also be available after it has finished:
    4 points
  15. We ARE the greybeards.
    4 points
  16. OK, ImageMagick does a beautiful job removing the watermark: Will convert it to a bunch of JPEGs, then: Will remove the watermark. (make sure you do this in a separate directory or it'll de-watermark your other JPEGs too) Run those through an OCR and you should get a relatively clean text. Quickly ran a test page (page 59) through Pleco OCR and when isolated to single columns it was 100% accurate, so just have to chunk this up into smaller images and do that in bulk.
    4 points
  17. Looks like we have an official implementation date: 1 July. 《国际中文教育中文水平等级标准》发布 2021-03-31 来源:教育部 http://www.moe.gov.cn/jyb_xwfb/gzdt_gzdt/s5987/202103/t20210329_523304.html The web page has a link to a PDF of the 260-page draft standard. Knock yourselves out.
    4 points
  18. Not sure if it helps, but some years ago I made a chart which shows an example character and roughly how many homophones there are for each pinyin syllable: https://github.com/jiong3/pinyinChart
    4 points
  19. I just finished this book today. Started reading it after attending that online talk about the book earlier this month. I really like it, even though it’s sad I find the fact that the main character is not bitter about his life makes it somewhat ‘hopeful’ in places and I like reading about his feelings and thoughts about his children even when he makes mistakes. Vocabulary not too bad for HSK 5 ish level, the first few pages were a bit tough but then it got better. There are also a lot of repetition of words, start to get easier to read by the 20-30th page.
    4 points
  20. Hi there, I’m new here and this is my first post. I’ve been following you for quite a long time now and I thought it was time for me to post my first thread. it is about the placement of auxiliary verbs according to this link https://resources.allsetlearning.com/chinese/grammar/Chinese_word_order#Placement_of_target_in_a_sentence I often find it confusing to get the right word order when such verbs are present, E.g. 我一定会记得你 but 我会一直想你 As I don’t seem to be able to find a rule to stick to, I’d like to know if there’s one that can help me better understand the pla
    4 points
  21. Done Grace of Kings. The parallels to the Chu-Han contention were impossible to ignore, especially as it went on, but I still really enjoyed it! I will read the sequel eventually. For now, going back to Chinese novels, or at least one. Gonna make it an easy one, though 许三观卖血记. Should be decent for getting back into gear as I've taken about 6 weeks off any Chinese study that isn't just semi-regularly Chairman Bao articles.
    4 points
  22. I would say that worrying about these tiny distinctions or which dictionary to "trust" is unecessary. They are all right [enough to be useful most of the time]. When I was pushing through HSK 4 and 5, I also learnt words in a mass approach by trying to learn their closest meaning in English, as well as learning the "sense" of characters that might not appear on their own, but appear in two character words. I feel like getting the sense of single characters has paid off later in my studies with 成语 and ancient Chinese. For me the goal was to make a "dictionary entry" in my head wher
    4 points
  23. Chinese vaccine makers first need to apply for approval of their vaccines with the European Medicines Agency (EMA) in the EU, FDA in the US and similar agencies around the world. However, they haven't tried - likely because they lack sufficient data to show safety & efficacy. Although companies like Sinopharm have claimed their vaccines cause no adverse effects, anyone with any training vaccines knows this is lie. https://apnews.com/article/china-vaccines-worldwide-0382aefa52c75b834fbaf6d869808f51 In Europe, Serbia & Hungary are giving Chinese vaccines to their pop
    4 points
  24. If I think I can be a bird, I still can’t fly. Doesn’t matter how many days I’ve got. ”Learning is defined as a change in long-term memory” It depends where you draw the line. But if you know a new word at the end of today, you definitely haven’t learned it yet.
    4 points
  25. Well, pretty much what @somethingfunny said, and this: My current learning pattern is 3 x 1 hour Skype lesson a week. I'm not interested in "impressing the teacher", but I am interested in making the most of the time we have. Compare the texts from the HSK books at level 3 and level 5 (click to enlarge images). (edit: These are from the widely-used HSK Standard Course series published by BLCUP.) This is HSK 3 chapter 20 of 20. There are 3 short dialogues and 1 short article, each with 2-5 new words; 14 new words for this chapter. So a v
    4 points
  26. I just finished The Grace of Kings by Ken Liu and really liked it. It's basically David Eddings meets Romance of the Three Kingdoms. I like how entirely Chinese-American this and Liu's other work is. This book sits very squarely in the English-language fantasy tradition (Tolkien, Eddings, Martin etc) and fills that in with all Chinese scenes and characters. An eight-foot, double-pupiled mighty warrior, a large country united, divided, united, divided and united again, warlords fighting, a warlord and his party being relegated to one small faraway island and then fighing their way back, a vener
    4 points
  27. This is actually very encouraging. To be honest I think my vocabulary level is probably a bit higher than yours was when you began the series, so if you did it then I should be able to too. I am now at about 40 pages in and am not finding it to be too hard to keep going. I am doing a fair amount of pleco lookups every page (usually somewhere between 2 and 10), but that is totally normal for me when starting a new book or author, and the story is plenty interesting enough to keep me going even when it might take up to 10 minutes to get through some of the more difficult pages.
    3 points
  28. I also read 三体 because of pressure from a Chinese friend! By the time I started it, I had about 7000 vocabulary flash cards, and I had read two short books (so this was my third book overall). I ultimately had to learn 2000 new words, averaging almost 7 on each page. It was a massive project, but Liu Cixin's writing style was quite clear. So at the end of the day, I could understand the story, and that was satisfying enough for me to continue. It does have a few STEM discussions in it (computers, quantum physics, astronomy, etc.), which some people might not have the patience to endure. My bac
    3 points
  29. Millet is 小米, as in 小米粥。 茶叶 is more common for tea when you are referring to dry tea leaves. (A cup of brewed tea would usually be 茶水 in everyday speech.) In the supermarket, best to ask for 白砂糖 when you mean ordinary granulated white sugar. 多用面粉 is ordinary all-purpose flour. (Also more formally called 多用途面粉.) If you want to label some of your cooking utensils, this old thread has some names: https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/53539-survivor-china-minimalist-dormitory-cooking/?tab=comments#comment-409737 I'll take a look at your other kitchen
    3 points
  30. As we are now over 1/4 of the way through 2021, I figured I will give an update. Here are my goals that I set on January 1st: For my reading goal, I read about half of 草鞋湾 in January, then stopped reading until late march after I had basically taken a 6 week break from studying Chinese altogether. In the past 2 weeks I finished the rest of that book and have started my second book, 三体。 This puts me pretty much right on pace for my reading goal, which to be fair is much easier to keep up with than my listening goal. Now for my listening goal, at the s
    3 points
  31. A bit late to the party but I just finished this book. This was the third chinese novel I have read, following 活着 and 许三观卖血记. I enjoyed this book quite a lot. It is fairly fast paced, and something interesting happens in every chapter which definitely helped to keep me turning the pages. Although it is a children's book, I felt that it was fairly mature, and plenty enjoyable to read as an adult. The father/son relationship is definitely the highlight of the book. Their relationship is beautiful yet believable. There are plenty of twists that I never expected, which was always a pl
    3 points
  32. In fact it should be 大米。白饭,米饭,饭 are all cooked If I'm not mistaken, 小米 is actually also pretty a basic Chinese kitchen ingredient. I believe 小米粥 is pretty common.
    3 points
  33. Unless you are totally stuck on Anki, I recommend TofuLearn, which has decks for all the HSK standard level lists. Really convenient to learn and review on one's phone. Those do include the part of speech, along with sample sentences.
    3 points
  34. @Catcot this might interest you. I only recently found out that there is an UK Chinese Brush Society, you may find much useful information, lovely paintings, and also contact some of the members through their web site: Chinese Brush Painters Society (cbps.org.uk)
    3 points
  35. I started this thread a long time ago but now that I've got some time to spend studying Chinese again, I've started flashcarding again too. But unlike previous decks, for this one, each item generates three cards - I now go three ways - testing me on: 1. Chinese characters -> Pinyin + English 2. Pinyin -> English 3. English -> Pinyin (All three parts are shown in each answer). I added numbers 2 and 3 because I worry that if I just test myself on Chinese characters, I'm often not remembering a two-character word, but am instead deciphering
    3 points
  36. The fabulous archaeological excavations at Sanxingdui (Sechuan) have been causing quite a stir lately as more surprising objects were retrieved from newly opened pits. This article is from The World of Chinese magazine : Unearthing China’s Other Civilization. "The 3,000-year-old Sanxingdui Culture is a mysterious complication in ancient Chinese history." You can find more articles anywhere you look online these days, also many videos in You Tube and equivalent Chinese platforms. Sadly, it's not possible for many of us to even plan a visit, but there is one ni
    3 points
  37. So, the first quarter is over and in the meanwhile I graduated and will be looking for a job starting this month. It will be more difficult with a full-time job to dedicate myself to Chinese, but I'm still very motivated and enjoying it, so I think the plan I set for this year is very doable. So far I've managed to keep up with most of the things I wanted to do 加油 to everyone! 😀
    3 points
  38. Not sure you need anything more than a stopwatch and a suitable text whose wordcount you know or can quickly find out. Oh, and a calculator! Not trying to be glib - I just don't think it's all that difficult to measure reading speed, and improving it seems to be a case of just forcing yourself to try to read a little quicker than last time. But happy to be proved wrong if there is some really useful software out there cos I really need to read faster than I do.
    3 points
  39. I extracted all the columns and removed the watermarks. I'll probably have time later today to OCR everything. GitHub repo with the images
    3 points
  40. @mikelove I have Tesseract chewing on the PDF right now. Maybe all that pre-processing won't be necessary? edit: Here's the raw text output. Doing something like what Mike suggested may be the best way of extracting these wordlists. raw_ocr_output.txt
    3 points
  41. Are you sure it's a Chinese movie and at the end they fly away together in the hot air balloon? I can only recall two movies. One is a comedy, but at the end they flew away together in a kite with a little boat. The other one kind of had the vibe of Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, but at the end the man died and only his corpse flew away in the hot air balloon.
    3 points
  42. The placebo would have been just saline. This is from Pfizer's Dec 10, 2020 presentation to FDA on their vaccine: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee December 10, 2020 Presentation - BNT162b2 Vaccine Candidate Against COVID-19 p.29: Notably, placebo side effects such as fatigue, headache and chills were much more strongly imagined in 16-55 year old groups than in 55-85 year old groups (I would have guessed the latter group would have reported much more fatigue and headache and I would have guessed wrong). This was from a huge study.
    3 points
  43. Thought I would bump this thread since I came across it searching the forum. Some of the new members may not have seen it before. Mirrors my own experience.
    3 points
  44. Added three new series with full subs. Since discovering the magic of MPV video player, the MPVacious plugin and subs2srs, I'm focusing on srt files rather than plain transcripts. Would love to include videos files to match the subs but I suspect that would get me into trouble. 独家记忆 - Full Series (24 Episodes - Subs) iq.com 赘婿 (30 Episodes - Subs) iq.com 鬓边不是海棠红 Full Series - (Subs) iq.com
    3 points
  45. I feel like theres some connection with spatial memory in there too - when im writing things out with my hand, part of the muscle memory building seems to be a process of building some 'shape' that my brain associates with the memory. When things are on a screen my brain doesn't seem to access them in quite the same way, as if they are only two dimensional, not being 'written' into a three dimensional space by my hand. I've found the same with all the Zoom meetings and classes over the last few months - I saw some of my students in person today for the first time in about 6 months. My first th
    3 points
  46. I have always believed this to be true. Muscle memory is the key. I have only found one electronic method to help and that is Skritter, I use it on my tablet and the size of the character is quite big and using a stylus mimics a pen and I have found almost every character I studied using Skritter has the highest retention of all. I also write on paper a lot not just single characters but copy out paragraphs from lessons to help with comprehension, how grammar works and just the general flow of text. I have just decided to re subscribe to Skritter as my hiatus from serious study h
    3 points
  47. It’s a cognitive load issue. If you “pre-learn” the character form, pronunciation, and meaning, then it will free up the limited processing space in your brain for understanding its use in context. Too much cognitive load and your brain can’t process it and you just give up because you feel miserable. This is one way to mitigate cognitive load but there are others. The one thing you can’t do is overcome cognitive load. If you do it this way then you can spend class time using the words in discussion with the teacher, rather than asking the teacher the pronunciation/me
    3 points
  48. I wonder why it's important to you to have a method of remembering these words? If they're important enough for you, you will just learn them one way or another, naturally. At the very advanced level, you're pretty much in the same position as a native speaker faced with learning new words. I can give you three examples of me as a native English speaker encountering new English words. 1) I recently joined a listserv where apparently most of the members are millennials and they use a LOT of slang that is unfamiliar to me. Around three times a week I have no idea what
    3 points
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