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Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/21/2019 in Posts

  1. 5 points
    Just stumbled across this excellent and thoroughly comprehensive guide to the honorific language in Chinese in the form of a wikipedia entry. I thought it seemed a bit of a shame not to share it here, as the author(s) has (have) clearly put in a lot of work into this article. I would say I know or have come across less than a third of all the words listed, fantastic to get a better understanding of a less discussed topic. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_honorifics
  2. 4 points
    Yeah, that. I sound so fluent and extremely competent in everyday situations, and then I try to do something two centimeters outside my comfort zone and it all crumbles.
  3. 4 points
    I'd ask if my students are likely to ever need to have a simple daily conversation. Many students of English in China are preparing for exams and have little concern about anything else. If that's what you've been hired to do, and that's what the students want... This is a very old chestnut. If you've found yourself teaching a roomful of Chinese toddlers, go for it. If not, bear in mind your students do have valuable skills three-year-olds don't, but they don't have a decade of brain-plasticity to work with. The way you're approaching it *might* work, in the right hands. It also looks suspiciously like what many unqualified teachers end up doing because they have no idea of how to approach the job systematically.
  4. 3 points
    You don’t see doing that for yourself as a bit of a milestone? Like the first time you order for yourself, that time the kuaidi understands what you’re saying, when you direct a taxi to exactly where you are. All Chinese learner moments to savour. If these aren’t moments to value as a language learner then what is? I’m honestly curious what you think. Usually our views on here seem pretty in line 😂
  5. 3 points
    I don't hang with expats. Period.
  6. 3 points
    Incidentally, Jiangmen has the same pronunciation as anus in Cantonese.
  7. 2 points
    I really think that from Day One your teacher should speak naturally. Simple language, clearly pronounced, but at normal speed. Remember, you don't have to understand everything. A good classroom teacher will always be chatting away just to help the class to become accustomed to the sounds of the language, knowing full well that the students aren't grasping everything. Indeed, you'll study for years and you still won't understand every word everyone says. An important part of learning Chinese -- any language really -- is developing a knack for quickly grasping the meaning without trying to catch every word.
  8. 2 points
    I find the standard distribution (Bell curve) is very wide. I know several learners10+ years and despite continual learning really have a very moderate level (can't understand TV etc) Others adopted a street style learning and achieved a good level very quickly, however character recognition is almost non existent. Lots of factors involved and even if you take a group of learners with an identical study pattern, the variation amongst individuals to learn the language varies greatly depending on age, previous experience, general ability to learn languages etc I was clearly the worst in my class (even my teachers noted it ) despite doing my far the most work. My modest improvements only came through shear effort. No magic formula despite what technique falls in and out of fashion. One thing I believe vital to effective study is to find your own path. Sure you should consider what others have you say but don't take any thing as the optimal way. Good example is rote learning, flash cards. Some people are dead set against it. For me it's s vital component (as long as it's in conjunction with others learning ), other highly disagree. It's clearly the right choice for me personally . Others suggest speed reading as a good technique. I think it's bad technique and actually counterproductive. However I would never suggest anyone to not at least try it.
  9. 2 points
    I have no idea in this matter, so just want some advice, if there was some students done it before I just wanted to hear what situations they had faced. Did I asked something nonsense?
  10. 2 points
    Wouldn't be surprised to learn it's Shanghainese, every city had its own turns of phrase and the linguistic differences only exacerbated that. I more and more suspect it's a larger mansion sub-let into multiple occupancy and now each wing in rented out as a unit, sort of like the way Georgian mansions in Dublin became tenements. Interested to know the correct answer, which is why I enjoy your questions here!
  11. 2 points
    At the risk of seeming didactic, the discussion at the link I provided is correct. And by the way, what counts isn't what a native speaker says they think they say, it's what they actually say. Have a discussion in Chinese with the lady in the store -- assuming she's a native speaker and not an oversea Chinese -- and listen carefully. (Always giving third tone its full value -- and forgetting tone sandhi -- is actually a mocked characteristic of foreigner Chinese. Some years ago it wasn't uncommon to hear a taxi driver or local low life yell out a horribly sounded 你好 to taunt you as you walked by. [We normally don't talk about these things but we all know they used to happen, always when you were walking alone, never when with a Chinese.])
  12. 2 points
    Listening to myself speak, my accent was more Australian than even I imagined.
  13. 2 points
    I am going to suggest it's related far more to socio-economic level than to big versus small town. Your dinner was no doubt not with a group of bus drivers.
  14. 2 points
    Not me. I know better than to trust Chinese chocolate goods - they invariably taste awful, which is probably why OP thought they were dog food.
  15. 2 points
    Sun Tzu disagrees: "The greatest victory is that which requires no battle"
  16. 1 point
    Hello I write from Europe, there are very few Chinese restaurants in my area. One of them has delicious Sichuan beef sirloin on the menu. I would like to learn how to make it, I have tried many recipes from the internet and this is still not it. I have a problem to get a "watery" sauce and a clear spicy, salty and sour taste. My dishes do not have this clear salty and sour taste and the whole is sticky or reduced. There are instructions in the recipes that I have, I don't know what to change or what I do wrong. Or these recipes are wrong. Do any of you have a good and tested recipe for such a dish? I use Doubanjiang paste because it is recommended in many recipes. Please, help, because Im lack ideas!
  17. 1 point
    Another response when you speak naturally is "你的中文很自然." In my experience, this is a true compliment (or just an observation) as a opposed to a shallow compliment to encourage you. Exactly. This is also one of the values of learning full sentences instead of memorizing words. Learning a full sentence can give you a sense of the cadence & rhythm of the language. One thing that can help you is ask her speak at a natural speed, but to add pauses between sentences that you'll likely not know (i.e., if you're having a conversation as opposed to learning a specific sentence). If I'm talking with someone and I miss their 1st sentence, I'll be thinking about that sentence while they say sentence 2, 3 & 4 and as result, miss all of it. Pauses helps with this.
  18. 1 point
  19. 1 point
    I have no problem with that. It's just exchanging pleasantries. Far better than the "are you married, got boyfriend or girlfriend, where are your parents , how much money do you own, do you own a flat, how much do you earn"
  20. 1 point
    Those of you who can hold long conversations in Chinese, who can understand what people say on the streets, and understand Chinese radio and TV, how many years average would you say it takes to get to such a level?
  21. 1 point
    I completely agree that those are all moments to savour, and I also agree with Vellocet when he (quite honestly) talks about how big and not very humble you can feel when other foreigners marvel when you prattle away merrily in Chinese. They are milestones in language learning sure. But they're not milestones for living in China - unless you've got no one to help you! Maybe someone who hunts and kills his own food would look down on me for going to the butcher, but what can I say, it works for me. So, I wouldn't look down on someone who relies on a translator for their posting to China. Initially, in this thread, I was struck by a couple of things. First, the suggestion that one couldn't respect expats who don't speak the local language - that seemed unkind, for a start. It would like someone saying they don't respect people who don't do any exercise, or don't read poetry, or have never got to grips with Ἀριστοτέλης . Second was the implication that speaking to people about everyday things like plumbing or taxi directions would give you a great insight into China which non-speakers would miss. But it won't! Serious, properly nuanced conversations, will give you insight but until you've got great Chinese, those conversations will be in English or they just won't happen. What would be more interesting - an HSK 2 level conversation about the weather with a taxi driver, or a long chat in the back of the car with a local who speaks your own language fluently and wants to talk about pollution or politics or how their hometown has changed over the last 20 years? If you're assigned to China for three years and you don't need to speak Chinese and you're in an area where there are lots of pleasant interesting people who speak good English, why bother learn Chinese unless you really want to. Most of us here on these forums will want to. But we're the unusual ones. Looking down on other foreigners in China for not being like us is just as narrow-minded as looking down on Chinese people for not being like us
  22. 1 point
    I feel like it’s not old well paid “business” expats who’ve been here 25 years though. From my reading this is what Vellocet is talking about. The days of having extravagant expat packages are long gone. Equally, the overall “quality” of foreigners has improved due to above mentioned requirements. It seems like many foreigners seeking a life here are on the younger side. Equally though, most are not fresh graduates as mentioned above as, again, the requirement above means you need 2 years experience. What NewEnglander is describing doesn’t seem to hold with what I experience actually living here.
  23. 1 point
    That sounds like a group self-selecting for not hating China. The complainers mostly wander off to more agreeable climes by the 25 year mark.
  24. 1 point
    谢顶 - to go bald. From here.
  25. 1 point
    Yes, superficial ones like those - basically, trivial. During my first two years in China, when I arrived speaking no Chinese and had a full-time job*, I made several friendships which remain extremely important to me, but I don't think that would have happened if they'd been conducted in beginner-level Chinese (or beginner-level English, for that matter). And without those friendships, I'd never have been that interested in China or Chinese, nor would I have been motivated to spend much time learning Chinese. Imagine if I'd have told those English-speaking Chinese people who quickly became close friends that I had no time to chatter with them in English because I was too busy trying to attain sufficient Chinese fluency to one day summon a plumber! Speaking Chinese shows you're giving China a lot of face, but I don't think it'll change any Otherness. *16-hours a week teaching spoken English
  26. 1 point
    This is a patriotic adventure story with stunning scenery. Much of it was filmed in Tibet. It's the story of climbing Mt. Everest (Qomolangma Feng 珠穆朗玛峰) first in 1960 when there was no photographic proof (the camera was lost) and again in 1975 when it was properly documented. Famous leading actors (吴京 as the male lead and 章子怡 as his lady love.) Directed Tsui Hark 徐克, one of the Gods of Hong Kong action movies together with Daniel Lee 李仁港, who is also no slouch in that genre. I caught it this afternoon, near the end of its run. It opened just before the recent Golden Week holiday and pulled in large audiences all over China. Lots of flag waving and feel-good national sentiment. This is not some ambiguous art movie. The directors and the lush musical score let you know how you should feel at each step along the way. It's easy to go along with the program because it's all convincingly done. Everyone loves a challenge, and this movie showed brave people who wouldn't quit despite long odds. A little bit of medical foolishness, but not more than was to be expected. At one point the star is crushed in an avalanche and apparently suffers cardiac arrest. After several rousing minutes of CPR, his heart starts and he soldiers on, more or less unfazed. Jackie Chan 成龙 even makes a cameo performance at the end. It was well worth the price of a ticket to see this film on the big screen. Here's a link to several trailers: https://www.soku.com/detail/show/XMTc0MjQ1Mg==?siteId=1
  27. 1 point
    So obvious once you know the answer, but I had to look it up: 退伍軍人病
  28. 1 point
    What a great article. I am going to use some of these and see what happens!
  29. 1 point
    I’ve got all mine set to black. It’s what Chinese people do. That was facetious, but more seriously, * I think Chinese elementary school textbooks go from pinyin, to characters with pinyin over, to characters with tone marks over, to characters alone. * PS Edit: I woke up this morning a bit more sober and realised this isn't actually the case. They go from pinyin over the characters, to characters. There's no stage with tone marks over characters. Apologies.
  30. 1 point
    I do this regularly. Part of the problem is I don't live in China and despite very regular conversations with Chinese friends, there are so many expressions that I never use with them, but I need to remember. I really liked Imron's comment on not just learning words (and the whole interview was interesting). Learning a word without learning how it is used in sentences is not very useful because just dropping the word into a grammatically correct Chinese sentence may still be nonsensical (i.e., it assumes the word's usage necessary correlates to its usage in English). Recently, I met a Chinese Elementary school teacher who teaches English in Beijing. I mentioned the old way of having students memorize words. She said now they teach kids "chunks" - i.e., they learn words by how they are used in sentences & phrases (i.e., like the way Pimsleur teaches). It was great to hear the change. (I met her in a Toastmasters speaking club meeting in Beijing, Bookworm Toastmasters Club. I've mentioned that Toastmasters is a great way to meet people. I even met a Chinese police officer - the first time I've met one personally in China. In previous posts, I've mentioned Toastmasters as a great way to meet people & find language partners). I like this forum because helps me find learn ways of learning so thanks to Kanumo for making me aware of this podcast.
  31. 1 point
    Is there an assumption here that most people won't have looked at native materials until they've passed HSK6? I'm sure that's true for some, but equally sure it's false for others. I completely agree that for anyone who has passed HSK6 without looking at native materials, it's almost certainly a good idea to start. That may hold true for passing HSK5, too. But for people who have recently passed HSK6 and have also watched lots of TV, read novels and magazines - don't neglect advanced level textbooks! If they're advanced enough, they'll contain only native materials (plus glosses for proper nouns), but they're native materials that experts in teaching advanced Chinese to foreigners believe are particularly useful for advanced learners to read and study. As for novels, a couple of years ago I started a page with links to novels I and others had read, but then - I think this is just coincidence - I gave up Chinese. https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/53547-book-list/
  32. 1 point
    Because Shanghai is south of the Yangtze, historically buildings don't have central heating and can be damp, chilly and uncomfortable in winter. But in recent years, those dual heating-cooling A/C units have become very common across China, so îf you're looking for a place to live, just make sure it's got a dual A/C unit. And a quiet one at that: look where the compressor is placed.
  33. 1 point
    Cantonese chauvinism it's usually called in English.
  34. 1 point
    Ive only been to Jiangmen for a day. Went down to see the diaolou. Beautiful area. Stayed the night and wandered around tge medium small city. Seemed like a very relaxing place. Had some excellent 早茶 in the morning😊. I live in 广州 and i find it the worst city in china for learning mandarin. Yes, its true that most people can speak mandaring along with cantonese, but i feel like they are less responsive to me speaking mandarin with them than anywhere else ive been. I travel very frequently and always get more practice in other provinces. I feel like gz locals tbink “hmm i dont even prefer speaking madarin, let alone with an elementary level 外国人”。 I rarely get this feeling in other provinces. It also seems to be getting better as i slowly improve. Obviously im generalizing, ive met some people who were happy to speak with me in mandarin. Nearly everytime i get a friendly chatty taxi driver, tgey turn out to be from 河南。 My northern wife has zero problem communicating, but sometimes feels left out at work when conversations go canto. She also misses hearing more standard sounding chinese.
  35. 1 point
    @abcdefg my mother in law made the 包子. She does spend a while on them(not in a dark back room😄). She uses the wok with a steamer tray. Those particular ones didnt puff up as much as hers normally do though. These were 猪肉 and sanxian. I like them better tgan 饺子
  36. 1 point
  37. 1 point
    I think this must be an uncommon situation. All the younger people speak Mandarin. Older ones don’t speak it so well. It might have happened during the time the government tried to reduce Cantonese radio or something like that. People interpreted as active suppression of dialect and didn’t take kindly to it. I asked a media station person what happens at dinners. Usually if the whole table were cantonese speakers , they would use Cantonese. If just one person had mandarin but no Cantonese, the group would use mandarin. However, my recent experience this year showed this was a very generalised statement. At dinner with a big group who all knew each other fairly well, it was a mixture of Cantonese and mandarin because people split off into small groups and use the stronger dialect in that small subgroup accordingly. Even with me being much stronger in Cantonese, I still tried to use mandarin when appropriate in the subgroup. As to my level, I am doing good if I can manage two minutes of mandarin. When some non-Cantonese VIPs arrived, it went mostly to mandarin. For me, during the introductions, it was mandarin. Yeah, I had the weakest mandarin but I still had to make the effort. I admit that I have only been in the big cities- smaller towns probably have lower penetrance of mandarin.
  38. 1 point
    Both are pretty awful, each in their own way.
  39. 1 point
    Thanks for having me on. Pity we ran out of time so quickly! imron ('im' rhymes with 'him') I see it all the time with learners, and from experience, recognise it for the folly it is (wish someone had told me at the time, but I probably wouldn't have listened). My spoken Chinese was always good enough to get away with it, and coupled with preparing before and revision after it was more than enough to do well in the class, but it led to 'advanced with gaps'. Those gaps have long since filled in, but looking back and knowing what I know now, it would have been better to slow down and consolidate lower level skills rather than trying to rush to advanced. Like you said, there's plenty of material to lawnmow at the lower level.
  40. 1 point
    The fact that you perceived it easier to write your own GUIs rather than use the one they made speaks volumes. I actually installed one of the latest Supermemo releases the other week just to see if they'd made any improvements to the UI - and nope, it's still just as I remembered it.
  41. 1 point
    Those sound like good reasons to make it at home, at least when time permits. You can use good quality ingredients and you can vary the contents according to personal preference. Plus you can be sure it's made fresh from scratch on the premises, in your own kitchen. In the US it's an increasingly-common sight to see a large truck pulled up to the back of small restaurants delivering food that has already been preppped and maybe partially cooked. The local staff just applies the finishing touches and serves it up. Restaurants run on such a thin margin that they see the time and labor saving this affords as something they must do to survive. It's a pity, but understandable.
  42. 1 point
    Although I have a Chinese phone and downloaded WeChat in China, it nonetheless shows the major pages in English. Not sure why, maybe because English is set as the default language on my phone. Not sure why this is such a big deal, either. Seriously, if you want to get by in China you have to be flexible.
  43. 1 point
    Never hard of mupin before, but if it doesn't show tones... fine for showing Chinese names in a newspaper article, but wouldn't a learner be better off with... well, anything that shows tones. This seems like a substantial flaw. Is it widely used in textbooks or dictionaries?
  44. 1 point
    No pencil, no mouth, no food, no drawing a straight line. I'm not sure where that explanation came from, but it's simply not accurate. I'm going to oversimplify a bit here, but this is essentially what happened. There were originally two characters: and The one on the left is zuǒ (left hand), while the one on the right is yòu (right hand; now written 又). They look exactly alike, except for the direction they face. Over time, they started to resemble each other: (that's zuǒ, but you wouldn't know to look at it). So you have 𠂇 zuǒ and 𠂇 yòu. They look identical, but one is "left" and the other is "right." So how do you know which one you're looking at? You add a mark to distinguish them. Now you have 𠂇 zuǒ and 右 yòu. Note that in 右, 口 isn't "a mouth," but a distinguishing mark. But since 𠂇 can be "left" or "right," it's still a bit ambiguous. So it's really best to have a character used exclusively for "left," don't you think? Enter 左. It already existed, as a depiction of a "left" hand holding a tool (not a ruler, but a shovel-like tool of some sort), and it meant "to assist." They borrowed it to mean "left," and that's how we got to where we are today. All of this happened pretty early in the history of the writing system. Interesting tidbit: in Japanese and in traditional (not 繁體 but 傳統) stroke order rules, the 𠂇 in 左 and the 𠂇 in 右 are written with different stroke orders. That's due to the fact that they were originally different hands.
  45. 1 point
    Actually, 片 is a measure word for 心. But only when 'heart' means mind, thoughts, feelings, not the muscular organ, i.e. 心思, 心意. And it only combines with 一. 《漢語大詞典》 12. 量词。用于情感、声响、景象等。限于与数词「一」连用。 ●唐王昌龄《芙蓉楼送辛渐》诗之一:「洛阳亲友如相问,一片冰心在玉壶。」 ●五代和凝《天仙子》词:「桃花洞,瑶台梦,一片春愁与谁共?」 ●叶圣陶《线下·桥上》:「此时他们兴致正浓,只听见一片嚷嚷。」 如:一片新气象。 P.S. This sentence 一片冰心在玉壶 is hugely famous. An early 20th-century writer chose 冰心 as her pen name. And here's more: 游人五陵去,寶劍值千金。分手脫相贈,平生一片心。(唐‧孟浩然 《送朱大入秦》) 逢人且說三分話,未可全拋一片心。(民間格言,語出明‧馮夢龍《警世通言‧卷三十二》) 只是,那么个心思狡诘的女人,偏偏以一片赤诚之心待我。就如这触手可及的夜色星光,剔透玲珑。(丁墨《你和我的倾城时光》) 他怀揣着对祖国的一片赤子之心,在接下来的工作生涯中,将毕生心力全部投入到了国家水利事业建设当中。(张海君《爱国‧爱国之心从分毫开始》)
  46. 1 point
    I am looking for a folktale that I heard long time back. There was an very ugly looking king who never left his palace. Then a mask maker made a very handsome mask for him wearing which the king started going out. But the mask maker became greedy and started blackmailing the king for money or he will reveal the secret to the world. Once king was outside and the greedy mask maker snatched out the mask from the king's face, but now the king became handsome from the outside as he felt handsome from the inside. The actual story is quite interesting, but i only remember this much from what i heard. Could it be possible for you to help me in finding this folk tale.
  47. 1 point
    Just to follow up on my own progress, I ended up finishing the book, pretty much in one go, on January 1. Since no one else has been posting in here, I have just assumed that no one else was interested in reading it, so I have not posted any notes for the remaining chapters. I thought that Bian was a very interesting view into the formative years of Mo Yan, and a story that helps put into perspective what we already know about China and the social institutions that shaped Chinese society from the 60s onwards. I have seen several reviews online that complain that the story is too open-ended, and that it ends right after you start to feel attached to the main cast. I disagree with that. To me, the main story revolves around the different trajectories the lives of He Zhiwu and Lu Wenli took, two very different people from very different social backgrounds. Although the bulk of the text is about Mo Yan's own experiences, his life becomes a backdrop that explains what happened to the other characters as they bob through the story, emerging, disappearing and reemerging. It becomes clear that beeing groomed by the local officials as model citizens and currying favors with the higher-ups didn't necessarily prepare people for success, the way the children were taught to expect from childhood on. The unchecked patriotism and unquestioning loyalty to the system might in fact have led people into taking decisions that were destructive to themselves, to their families and to their communities as a whole. In places, Mo Yan almost goes as far as to say it outright. In chapter 5, for example, he laments: "我们同批入伍的战友,有很多去了前线。从内心深处,我是羡慕他们的。我希望自己也能有这样的机会,上战场,当英雄,闯过来可以立功提干,牺牲了也给父母挣个烈属名分,改变家庭的政治地位,也不枉他们生我养我。有我这种想法的,其实不止我一个人。这想法很简单,很幼稚,但确是我们这种饱受政治压迫的中农子弟的一个扭曲心态。窝窝囊囊地活着,不如轰轰烈烈地死去" - "A lot of my fellow soldiers went to the frontlines. I envied them from deep inside my soul. I also wished to be given a chance to enter the battleground and become a hero. If I survived, I would immediately be lauded and rise through the party ranks. If I did not, my parents would have their status changed to dependents of a martyr, and they would rise in political status. That way they would not have given birth to me and raised me in vain. I was not the only one harboring such thoughts. The idea was simplistic and naive, but it was a twisted mindset that could be found in the minds of us Chinese farmers who had suffered political repression. It was better to go out with a bang than to suffer a pointless existence." Through the entire story, I struggled with how to think about He Zhiwu. He was clearly never given a chance, and branded as as good-for-nothing from childhood, but through his craftiness and cunning, he ends up gaming the system and getting remarkable success. On the one hand, you can't help but root for him and feel that the entire story vindicates him. On the other hand, you realize that his successes have come about through fraud, deception and other underhanded practices. It's clear that those were the traits that were needed to succeed, and the behavior of the "moral guardians" throughout the story makes you empathize with He Zhiwu to the point where you think the ends might have justified the means, and the people who got the short end of the stick had it coming. The moral duplicity of He Zhiwu becomes something that to me signifies the spirit of the modern Chinese society. I still haven't decided if that is a good thing or a bad thing.
  48. 1 point
    Ok, back from holiday, here are my thoughts :-) What I mean by continually process information at speed is basically just listening or reading or doing some other active with native material, at or as near to native speed as you can manage. To do this, you need to be able to process a constant stream of input at a speed that is conducive to performing that activity in an enjoyable manner, and being able to do that for sustained periods of time. With listening, this means reaching a point where you can understand (most) things as they are said without (much) mental effort because if you slow down at all, you'll miss the next sentence while processing the last sentence and it will all come undone, and if it takes up too much mental effort you'll soon get tired and won't be able to process anything. With reading, it means reaching a point where you can understand (most) things with confidence and without needing to look things up in a dictionary (even just to check you were right), otherwise the constant stopping and starting will be grating. You need a modicum of speed (no need to speed read, but ideally you'd be able to read at common speaking speed) otherwise you'll never finish anything in a reasonable time, which will cause a negative feedback loop, and you need the stamina to do it for long periods of time without fatiguing your brain. Getting to that level takes time, and in order to make it you need to be focusing on the task at hand - which in the above two cases is going to be exposure to native material and using that material as your main source of learning - i.e. you want to be able to read/listen to this material and so that is what you should be spending your focus and energy doing. Flashcards can help consolidate the things you are learning with this process, but they shouldn't take up the main bulk of your learning time and/or be the major focus of your learning - this includes both revision and maintenance/creation. Flashcards are misleading in that they feel like work, and make you think you are improving because you can see deck size increasing and you're hitting all your revisions, but they rely on you to mark when you know a word and often the bar for 'knowing' a word in a flashcard revision is significantly lower that the bar of recognising a word instantly in a constant stream of surrounding context. If you pause for a fraction of a second before remembering the word when flashcarding, you'll probably mark the word as 'known' and move on. If you pause for a fraction of a second before understanding a word when you are reading or listening then it's going to cause problems. Building up the mental stamina to understand continually for a prolonged period of time also requires effort and is not things that you can do just by flashcarding isolated words or sentences. The only way to build up that proficiency is to practice doing it. Obviously 'just use native content' isn't really applicable to beginners, you probably need a solid intermediate level before it starts to become feasible. Even then it will always be difficult initially, and so you break it down in to smaller pieces - just like the link querido listed above as my source of inspiration. Take some native content, break it down in to manageable parts, practice listening/reading until you understand each manageable part, then put the manageable parts together, and repeat the process daily for a period of weeks/months and slowly the manageable parts grow in length, and eventually you reach a point where you can listen to TV/radio/movies and/or read native content. Flashcards are also unhelpful in that they play to fears about forgetting things you have learnt and they use that fear to keep you on the hamster wheel long after you should have gotten off. The reality is that it's ok to forget some of the things you have learnt (and in fact you'll do that constantly with flashcards anyway). As I've mentioned elsewhere, you don't really need to worry about forgetting 'important' words if you are getting regular exposure to native content because either the important words will occur with regular enough frequency that you won't forget them, or they won't appear with enough frequency in which case it's safe to say they are not important at this point in time and so you don't need to worry about them yet. Regarding tools and techniques you should be looking for anything that doesn't require much effort to use and configure. You need to be spending time on learning, not in wrangling software, not in splitting audio files and not in preparing to learn. This is why I prefer Pleco over Anki - flashcard creation and maintenance requires zero effort and takes effectively zero time. This is why I created Chinese Text Analyser because it simplifies the process of extracting unknown words and in determining if something is at a suitable level. You should also be looking to avoid accumulating things - just keep getting exposure to new content that interests you. If it doesn't interest you, put it aside and move on. Also make sure to pick things at the appropriate level - if it's too difficult, put it aside for now and find something easier until your level improves.
  49. 1 point
    I'm new here, and last year i saw this series and really enjoyed it. It's nice if u can see it from beginning, it's kind of like soap opera and most of the episodes can be understood separately. It's interesting the author used "古文诗句" to name every episode like a "章回小说" . Furthermore, I really like the names of the characters in it. They're all made up from some "武侠小说", like 白玉汤 is after 白玉堂, 佟湘玉 is after 金湘玉...... They are living in the ancient time but acting or talking like what we do nowaday, and u can hear some different kind of accents which make it more funny. Oh, i'm a girl, so my favorite is 老白, then 吕秀才, then 佟掌柜。 偶地神阿!
  50. 1 point
    我作为一个学习汉语的外国人, 当然是希望汉语的未来更美好, 这也对我个人有利。我十分同意“英语热”现如今热得有些发烧, 多注重孩子们的整体素质、心理素质, 在我看来也许更为明智。要求每个人有极高的英语水平, 就像是强迫整个中国人民一夜间变为新加坡人或香港人一样, 好像不大现实。 汉语在国际上的地位不仅仅是经济问题, 如果汉语不被别的民族视为具有独特的内涵、属于整个人类的文化遗产, 中国的经济再旺也不会引起多大的变化。在日本经济最繁荣的时候, 很多人始学日语, 但日语的地位之所以提高并不是因为经济 (至今外商在日本还是用英语), 而是因为日本的传统艺术、习俗、烹调、武术等等在国际上获得更大的认可, 更能被外国人接受。 也许只有中国人创造自己的“文艺复兴”, 汉语在国际上的认可程度才会有所提高。这当然并非一天两天的事情。
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