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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/19/2020 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    D is the only correct answer out of A/B/C/D. The "would" is not necessary: your "that later made history" would be OK. But I think the "would" is very natural here, probably because it adds an emphasis that at the time nothing was definite: he might not do the transplantation, it might not be successful. My feeling is that the "would" is a gentle reminder or emphasis that history would have been different if different decisions were made. Back then no one knew it was a "will make history", just a "could make history (if x, y and z)." An alternative: "... that went on to make history". Or: "that would go on to make history".
  2. 2 points
    A number of books I recommend if you want to know more about this type of language and how to transform it into good Chinese: 陳雲(陳雲係筆名,作者本名陳雲根):《中文解毒》、《執正中文》 古德明:《中華正聲》、《真假中文》 Ji Fengyuan: 《Linguistic Engineering: Language and Politics in Mao's China》 Warning: The above Chinese books are available only in traditional script. Having said that, I would also recommend the following if you want to be able to write good Chinese: 思果:《翻譯研究》、《翻譯新究》、《譯道探微》 余光中:《翻譯乃大道》 Disclaimer: 諸位有欲購上列書籍者,宜先閱其預覽頁,然後決定購買與否。由於書籍不合脾胃而造成經濟損失,Kenny同志不負責啊。
  3. 2 points
    I've done Chinese-to-English translation myself (monolingually-raised native English speaker) and also worked alongside other translators, most of whom were monolingually-raised native Chinese speakers. The best of them weren't able to produce truly "native-like" English, but that didn't mean their translations were bad or worthless. On the contrary, many times they could capture nuances in the source that I would have totally missed. Working together, them translating and me editing, we could produce better and faster results than either of us could individually. And for lower-priority copy that didn't need to be so polished, they could easily do a good-enough job without needing my help at all. Don't put yourself down Kenny! I'd rank your Chinese-to-English translations as on a par with some of the best I've worked with, which is no small feat.
  4. 1 point
    As a self-contained sentence it doesn't need any more context: the guy was the first person cured of HIV, he took the transplantation, the transplantation must have effected the cure (or the sentence would tell us otherwise). The transplantation is therefore historic. The answer is therefore not A, B or C, but D.
  5. 1 point
    @马M I've added stroke gifs and audio for the first 2000 characters or so. I'll gradually do the rest and hopefully words too.
  6. 1 point
    A. could have later made — Refers to a hypothetical that never happened in reality. It could have made history, but in fact it never did. B. should have later made — Same as A, but the author believes the event ought to have happened. C. might make later — This one is grammatical only in the way that "Colorless green ideas sleep furiously" is. The sentence doesn't make sense. D. would later make — This one is correct, because the event did happen. Even without knowing about Timothy Ray Brown's story, you can infer that this is the correct answer because it introduces him as "the first man cured of HIV" and uses the word "initially", implying that he later accepted it. You can think of "would" as the past tense of "will". Timeline: |------------------------| ^a ^b ^c Point a is the point of reference (in our example, the point at which Timothy Ray Brown opted out of the treatment) Point b is the event (being cured of HIV, thus making history) Point c is now At point a, we could say "if this treatment works, it will make history". From point c, we say that (as of point a) it "would later make history". Hope that makes sense. Tense/aspect in English is pretty weird.
  7. 1 point
    Is there a context that makes clear the transplantation does go ahead and is historic?
  8. 1 point
    Personally I really do not enjoy reading this style of Chinese. Do you know of any resources that descibe this phenomenon, either by giving examples, or by explaining when/why it started? I would love to understand more about whether its origin is very recent, or came in with in Communism, or pre-1949 Westernisation, or May 4th Baihua movement. I guess it's not a feature of late Qing written Chinese? And are you referring to the type of language which often occurs in e.g. newspaper articles too, or just self-consciously 'official' language? I have a feeling I asked you this before and you directed me to a web post in Chinese but I was too lazy to try to read/understand it.
  9. 1 point
    A key paragraph seems to be this one: Welcome to the first brick in the Great Firewall of the USA. Pompeo has already been making noises in that direction. It will be interesting to see how this plays out in the courts... (also interesting to note that Nov 12 is after the election, although whether this matters to the TikTok demographic is another question.)
  10. 1 point
    I've paid with Wechat while using a VPN.
  11. 1 point
    Hi, all. I took the HSK 4 and the HSKK (Intermediate) a while back (May 2018). My scores: 274 total on the HSK (91 listening, 95 reading, 88 writing) and 74 on the HSKK. I also was kind of curious how the mock exams compared to the real thing. Here’s how the real thing compared to my averages on mock tests (BLCU’s and Sinolingua’s) in the last month or so before the exam: Exam Total Score Listening Reading Writing Actual HSK 274 91 95 88 BLCU (average) 249 79 90 80 Sinolingua (average) 243 78 89 76 If anyone wants more details, I wrote up my experience taking the HSK in excruciating detail here. Cheers, Mark
  12. 1 point
    Reading List, from zero to native material (traditional characters) 1 DeFrancisReaders-BeginningChineseReader 87, 1341, 1341, 100, 399, 399, 3, 13 2 DeFrancisReaders-IntermediateChineseReader 77, 2449, 3790, 100, 401, 800, 6, 29 3 DeFrancisReaders-AdvancedChineseReader 79, 3073, 6863, 100, 400, 1200, 7, 46 4 ReadingsInChineseCulture-Book1 90, 257, 7120, 62, 163, 1363, 1, 47 5 TalesAndTraditions-Book1 95, 146, 7266, 43, 107, 1470, 1, 48 6 ReadingsInChineseCulture-Book2 91, 153, 7419, 40, 72, 1542, 2, 49 7 TalesAndTraditions-Book2 91, 163, 7582, 41, 93, 1635, 1, 50 8 ReadingsInChineseCulture-Book3 88, 183, 7765, 48, 84, 1719, 2, 51 9 TalesAndTraditions-Book3 82, 313, 8078, 59, 139, 1858, 2, 52 10 ReadingsInChineseCulture-Book4 86, 180, 8258, 67, 89, 1947, 2, 53 11 TalesAndTraditions-Book4 69, 377, 8635, 62, 150, 2097, 2, 54 12 ReadingsInChineseCulture-Book5 90, 278, 8913, 61, 115, 2212, 2, 55 13 SupplementaryChineseReaders-ChineseMoralTales 92, 379, 9292, 47, 82, 2294, 4, 57 14 SupplementaryChineseReaders-ChineseCustomsAndTraditions1 94, 477, 9769, 60, 118, 2412, 4, 58 15 SupplementaryChineseReaders-ChineseCustomsAndTraditions2 77, 337, 10106, 56, 104, 2516, 3, 59 16 SupplementaryChineseReaders-ChineseFolkTales1 92, 503, 10609, 42, 101, 2617, 4, 61 17 SupplementaryChineseReaders-ChineseFolkTales2 89, 666, 11275, 58, 126, 2743, 5, 63 18 SupplementaryChineseReaders-StoriesFromChineseHistory1 90, 401, 11676, 59, 107, 2850, 3, 64 19 SupplementaryChineseReaders-StoriesFromChineseHistory2 80, 619, 12295, 70, 150, 3000, 4, 65 20 ThoughtAndSociety 91, 568, 12863, 42, 68, 3068, 8, 69 21 SupplementaryChineseReaders-SelectedContemporaryChineseEssays 48, 535, 13398, 73, 153, 3221, 3, 70 22 SupplementaryChineseReaders-SelectedContemporaryChineseShortStories 51, 690, 14088, 71, 143, 3364, 4, 71 23 AReaderInPostCulturalRevolutionChineseLiterature 73, 2597, 16685, 56, 403, 3767, 6, 76 24 TheIndependentReader 79, 2123, 18808, 52, 137, 3904, 15, 80 This list was created based on the vocabulary lists linked in this thread. Only words which were also found in the handedict or cc-cedict were considered to filter out names, expressions, typos etc. Explanation of the numbers: Percentage of words in this book which passed the dictionary filter Number of new words in this book Accumulated number of words Percentage of new words in this book (out of all words in this book) New characters in this book Accumulated number of characters New words per new character in this book Percentage of TOCFL words covered (out of the 7293)
  13. 1 point
    Some more vocabulary lists for readers from this thread. All of the lists only contain the traditional characters and can be imported into Pleco. AReaderInPostCulturalRevolutionChineseLiterature.txt + TheIndependentReader.txt -- The two readers by Vivian Ling. TalesAndTraditionsSeries.txt -- link SupplementaryChineseReaderSeries.txt -- The complete series recommended by @OneEye here ThoughtAndSociety.txt -- The ICLP textbook AReaderInPostCulturalRevolutionChineseLiterature.txt SupplementaryChineseReaderSeries.txt TalesAndTraditionsSeries.txt TheIndependentReader.txt ThoughtAndSociety.txt
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