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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/23/2019 in Posts

  1. 7 points
    This is an Unfinished List (will update later as per contributions) This list of resources is meant for anyone that aims to improve their Chinese proficiency past the HSK benchmark. While the obvious course would be to consume whatever Chinese media you can get your hands on, I still believe that having a few resources on hand to kick-start the process can't hurt. Heck, it might even provide some well-needed structure. >Dictionaries & Flashcards 📱 Pleco 🆓 (Apple / Google / APK) [forums] • Most comprehensive database of Chinese dictionaries. • Flashcard system optimized with dictionary entries. • OCR (Optical Character Recognition). • Native pronunciation to a range of words. ... 📱 有道语文达人 💯(Xiaomi) • Lightweight Chinese to Chinese dictionary. • Shows synonyms and antonyms. ... >Reading (News Excluded) 📱 微信读书 👥🆓(Apple / Google / Xiaomi) • Most popular reading app in China. • Contents far-ranging. ... 📱 天天作文精选💯(Xiaomi) • Reading materials sorted by Chinese school grade all the way to 高考. • Short stories from 200 characters to 2000 characters. ... 📱 观止 💯(Apple / Xiaomi) • Don’t like the abundance of choice? Here is one short-story per day. • Short stories by critically acclaimed writers (cross-strait) • Want to read more? Randomly receive any of the previously posted stories. ... >News & Periodicals (Politics beware! Duhhh...) 📱🔗人民日标 👥 (Apple / Xiaomi)[Website Version] • “The Party’s Daily” ... 📱🔗纽约时报(Apple / Google)[Website Version] • NYTimes – Chinese Edition ... >Listening 📱 每天读点故事 ⚡👥 (Apple / Xiaomi / APK) • Stories by (I assume) amateur writers. • Spoken in by storytellers with the original text available • Non-Audio stories also available. ... 📱 得到 ⚡👥🈸 (Apple / Xiaomi / APK) • Collection of University level “classes” or rather thought provoking discussions. • Listen to books. ... >Pronunciation 📱 普通话学习 📞⚡(Apple / Xiaomi) • 15k+ words, tongue twisters, and more with standard pronunciation. • Ability to test your own pronunciation, graded by PC. • Personal tutors available. • [More information in another thread + translated word sheets] ... 🔗 普通话学习网 💯 [website address] • Similar and sometimes overlapping content with above, but free. • Audio fragments downloadable • Want to learn 儿化音? Here is all the 儿化! ... >Writing 🔗 范文等等 [Many Links > Here is one (Just Google 范文大全 or similar) • These are model essays, speeches, letters, and above all CONTRACTS. • Want to avoid getting scammed in a contract? Why not read some examples beforehand? • Need some flowery language for a love-letter? Here are 1000 examples. • Do you want to join the Communist Party? ... Probably not, but reading other model essays won’t hurt! ... 🔗 草书字体转换器 [Placeholder Website] • Website that allows you to type in text and get it in cursive. • Though only a placeholder, I wish I could find a teaching resource for 草书 ... I will keep updating this post in the foreseeable future. Please share anything you have. 【Meaning behind the emoticons】 📱 App on phone. 📚 Physical book. 📺 Television series. 🔗 Website address. 📞 Registering requires Chinese phone number. 👥 Registering requires WeChat authentication 🈸 Registering is possible with just an e-mail. ❔ [IF BLANK] Then just downloading is enough. 🔒 Region-Locked to China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Macao. 💯 Even if you wanted to pay they wouldn’t let you. 🆓 Standard (functional) version is free. Buying more content is optional. ⚡ Some free. You can slowly unlock content through use, but prohibitive. 💲 Requires an up-front purchase or monthly fee. Sometimes a demo is available. 🌄 Traditional Characters only AKA Taiwan or Hong Kong based.
  2. 1 point
    Because Shanghai is south of the Yangtze, historically buildings don't have central heating and can be damp, chilly and uncomfortable in winter. But in recent years, those dual heating-cooling A/C units have become very common across China, so îf you're looking for a place to live, just make sure it's got a dual A/C unit. And a quiet one at that: look where the compressor is placed.
  3. 1 point
    Not too new a word, but you'll find it in some recent news reports: 杯葛 "boycott"
  4. 1 point
    If you can read Chinese (and at HSK6 you should be able to), a better resource is 席殊3SFM实用硬笔字60小时训练. It's much more comprehensive than 'Chinese Cursive Script'. I agree that Chinese Cursive Script is an excellent English introduction to reading Chinese handwriting.
  5. 1 point
    I just remembered you asked about this a few weeks ago and I never got round to writing a reply. As imron says, 草书 calligraphy and 潦草 handwriting are two different kettles of fish: Calligraphy: Work from copybooks that ideally predate calligraphers from around the Ming dynasty (just a rule of thumb to get a good classical grounding) . The best copybooks to use for laying a foundation are 書譜 by 孫過庭 and 小草千字文 by 懷素. The method I use is simply rote learning, copying out characters and picking up the shortcuts for common components. I do have a self made anki deck of 2000 characters for learning 草书, but it's still a work in progress, and not as effective as rote repetition to be honest. Any 'textbooks' that purport to teach you 'how to 草书' are all complete trash. If anyone can prove me wrong please feel free to share. There are many on the market, but don't be fooled: 草书美学 demands variety in appearance, so be prepared for many alternative ways of writing almost all common characters. If you want to learn how to write 1000 characters in 草书, be prepared to learn at least an additional 1000 in variant forms. Handwriting: Learning to read and write natural, scrawled handwriting, the best resource by far is 'Chinese Cursive Script' by Fred Fangyu Wang, which also has a follow up 'reader' style book which you can find floating around the internet somewhere. Other than that it's back to native materials: I borrowed revision notes from a student to practice reading. Do Fred Fangyu Wangs book first, then just pick up a pen and start copying out everything you see written. It's like learning to listen and speak - when you don't understand something, go and find someone who does, write it down, learn it. I once wondered why there isn't just a simple dictionary for cursive, until I realised that writing in cursive is as nuanced in expression as the meaning of the characters themselves. A dictionary entry for a single character can go on for pages, and so too could different ways to write said character. Hope this helps a little
  6. 1 point
    I'd also add 喜马拉雅 and 故事FM for listening. For Pleco, I think it's worth explicitly mentioning some of the dictionaries. In particular the Guifan C-C dictionary is invaluable, and once you're at HSK6 and beyond you should be using a C-C dictionary as your main dictionary.
  7. 1 point
    @abcdefg my mother in law made the 包子. She does spend a while on them(not in a dark back room😄). She uses the wok with a steamer tray. Those particular ones didnt puff up as much as hers normally do though. These were 猪肉 and sanxian. I like them better tgan 饺子
  8. 1 point
    @op Ive found very liitle value in asking native speakers to "teach" you anything, unless they are actual teachers. How much do most people know about the mechanics of their own language? Better to practice with average(non linguist) native speakers, and dont look for advice from them on learning from tgem. I think yoyo is excellent by the way, i have been doing their full course for almost a year.
  9. 1 point
    As the person who wrote "HSK 6 gets your halfway", my personal recommendation is to jump in to native material - books, TV, film, podcasts - there's a wealth of content available as long as you have access to the internet (living in China or attending a Chinese course is not required). At that level, I think there's very little that makes sense course-wise, except maybe the IUP and/or the ICLP. You just need to start studying for the TOCFL.
  10. 1 point
    I am glad that the subject of it taking a long time to learn chinese as been mentioned and by some well respected people. I have experienced some not so polite comments about the amount of time I have been studying chinese and why considering its been over 35 years, I am not completely fluent and living in China. Trying to explain that I am learning for pleasure and to keep my brain working appears to be difficult, it seems that one is supposed to rush through everything and pass exams, get qualified and DO something with your chinese. I often find myself going back a few lessons and reviewing. I have on occasion gone right back to early lessons and just skim reviewed them right up to my present level. I find that sometimes things are mentioned that the textbook says it will go into detail later ie you don't need to know why yet, just that it is. Sometimes all these things will come together and better overall understanding emerges. Never give up on reviewing and don't assume things, don't skip things thinking its not important, don't skim over something because you can't get it right, that shows you may need to go back a step. On another subject, imron sounded just as Australian as I expected:) I was hoping to hear some chinese, its always interesting how people's original accent creeps in and very, very subtly affects their chinese.
  11. 1 point
    At the risk of seeming didactic, the discussion at the link I provided is correct. And by the way, what counts isn't what a native speaker says they think they say, it's what they actually say. Have a discussion in Chinese with the lady in the store -- assuming she's a native speaker and not an oversea Chinese -- and listen carefully. (Always giving third tone its full value -- and forgetting tone sandhi -- is actually a mocked characteristic of foreigner Chinese. Some years ago it wasn't uncommon to hear a taxi driver or local low life yell out a horribly sounded 你好 to taunt you as you walked by. [We normally don't talk about these things but we all know they used to happen, always when you were walking alone, never when with a Chinese.])
  12. 1 point
    I am going to suggest it's related far more to socio-economic level than to big versus small town. Your dinner was no doubt not with a group of bus drivers.
  13. 1 point
    Roddy, please bring back the "vote down" button.
  14. 1 point
    Incidentally, Jiangmen has the same pronunciation as anus in Cantonese.
  15. 1 point
    Rein yourself in there, 重大雷雨, please.
  16. 1 point
    That's a dirty game creating a quote I didn't say. Do you really belong on this board? If so, clean up that quote and apologize for the lie that I said it.
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