Jump to content
Chinese-forums.com
Learn Chinese in China

Featured

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 02/02/2023 in all areas

  1. I'm not sure, but it seems like a 2005 Hongkong horror movie - 凶男寡女(Set up). The female leader is played by 钟丽缇(Christy Chung). At the end of the movie, the fl was committed to a psychiatric hospital. Edit:just found It's more like a 2009 Hongkong horror movie - 再生号(Written By). The fl's father is played by 刘青云(Sean Lau). 再生号 ( 2009 ) I don't like horror movies, so I haven't watched any of them.
    5 points
  2. It sounds like she's busy having a baby and doesn't have time for chit-chat.
    5 points
  3. Master the pinyin table and the pronunciation. Do not worry about anything else in the first couple of weeks. You think you know the pronunciation already? No you do not. It takes time.
    3 points
  4. I suppose her waters may have broken immediately upon receiving abcdefg's congratulations. 美贺水破!
    3 points
  5. 1. Buy a standard textbook and follow it along with whatever else you do. 2. Hire a native-speaking tutor if you can afford it.
    2 points
  6. I did a little bit of thinking/remembering.... and we're looking at a lot more than 400 hours in 2022 alone I actually tracked my reading in a journal from March 1st, and from the end of March until the middle of July I tracked it in a chart and got 220 hours of reading in that time. I put the reading into a spreadsheet and made this nice graph of hours per day. I read 220 hours in 108 days, averaging 2:02 per day. I stopped tracking when I was no longer reading on my phone and so didn't have a convenient way to track my time. I also tracked listening time for the first two weeks, but that was bothersome so I didn't keep it up. I was averaging 3-4 hours of listening over that time. This really blows apart the 10 million characters in 400 hours calculation I did before because we can assume if I was listening for twice the time I was reading that in those 108 days I potentially did 400 hours of listening. If we then assume I continued at the same rate for the rest of the year which I will say is 150 days (to make things simple) we'll say I spent 600 hours for the 100 days March to July and then assume for 150 days I spent 900 more hours and we get to 1,500 hours for reading/listening to 10 million characters. I wouldn't claim that number with any certainty, it is edging closer to "accurate" though, because I started off at 0.5x speed and only really started working up to faster speeds later. I recall practicing with speeding up to 2.25x in September or October before settling back to more comfortable speeds. So probably the last 2-3 months of 2022 I was at 1.5x-1.75x speeds. So, if I wanted to I could make another ten million characters in 2023, but I'd only need to spend about 400 hours on it. It seems the first ten million are the hardest
    2 points
  7. It's one of a couple of characters used referring to various aspects, feelings, and actions involving "love." Hopefully, you're not contemplating getting a tattoo including characters you can't actually read. Inappropriate characters and character combinations might spoil the mood when you actually strip down to the body part displaying the offending characters and your Chinese partner erupts in guffaws, or loses his or her train of thought (so to speak) at a critical point in time. If you can't be dissuaded from getting it in a tatoo, be sure that you really, really trust the judgement and honesty of the native Chinese speaker who is helping you choose the appropriate meaning and helping to ensure the accuracy and quality of the "font" being used to ink your new "tat." People here will give you helpful and appropriate advice based on their own experience and approval of tattoos in general. However, for accuracy, the input of a native Chinese speaker is essential. But even native Chinese differ greatly in their own culture and cultural settings about tatoos. And they may not feel it is appropriate for them to dissuade you, a foreigner, from your endeavors. So be careful. If tatoos are far and away from your motivations for your question, just ignore my ranting and ravings. It's a cold but sunny early February afternoon on the Kanto Plain, and I finished my CupNoodle lunch early... Nuthin' better to do... TBZ
    2 points
  8. Pretty close. I've seen a study that sets the average Chinese word as ~1.5 characters. So 180 * 1.5 = 270 cpm. If English speaking speed is 170wpm, it'd be 170 * 1.5 = 255 cpm. Quick googling, https://virtualspeech.com/blog/average-speaking-rate-words-per-minute says from sampling TED talks: The average speaking rate was 173 words per minute. The speaking rate ranged from 154 to 201 words per minute. Popular TED Talk speaking rates How great leaders inspire action (Simon Sinek) – 170 wpm The power of introverts (Susan Cain) – 176 wpm Do schools kill creativity? (Sir Ken Robinson) - 165 wpm Why we do what we do (Tony Robbins) – 201 wpm The power of vulnerability (Brené Brown) – 154 wpm So it's very close for everyone other than Tony Robbins! Edit: That source also gives: Average speech rates Presentations: between 100-150 wpm for a comfortable pace Conversational: between 120-150 wpm Audiobooks: between 150-160 wpm, which is the upper range that people comfortably hear and vocalize words Radio hosts and podcasters: between 150-160 wpm Auctioneers: can speak at about 250 wpm Commentators: between 250-400 wpm Kennedy's Inaugural Ask-not-what-your-country-can-do-for-you speech was apparently at 100wpm.
    2 points
  9. Must confess to using it pretty indiscriminately quite a few times over the years of living in China. And the parents always beam and nod and take it as a compliment regardless of how the baby really looks. But, I have a lot to learn about these social niceties. I think it's actually rather important to know how best to respond to key moments in the lives of friends. Births, marriages, deaths. Each has important customs attached and they aren't always intuitive. Getting stuff like that right also makes you seem less foreign.
    2 points
  10. As to the phrase involving "white" and "fat" to describe the baby's appearance, it's a common enough phrase in many languages in Asia. It can also be used to describe females up to and including "pretty" young women, as well as children. "Gemuk dan putih" was translated by my chuckling teachers (women, by the way) as "fat and fair" in Indonesian and Malay. The compliment supposedly originates from the fact that the subject of the compliment doesn't have to work in the fields and comes from a wealthy family, and is therefore able to both protect her skin from the sun and enjoy an abundance of good food. That being said, it's always good (and safer) to listen to a native speaker's advice. I was once told by a young female Chinese teacher that her generation doesn't compliment others on their children, because under the one-child-per-family rules, other people's children can be looked upon as rivals for one's own child. This stunned me at first, but afterwards, others confirmed it. And in today's America, neither being seen as "fat," nor being seen as "white" is considered a compliment. Just my unasked for opinion... TBZ
    2 points
  11. It depends on how the baby really look. If the baby is not that 白 or 胖, better not say it. That means you need to know your friend's criteria for 白 and 胖 about a baby, so I think it's easier to use other praising words, like 可爱, 好看, etc. I usually use 恭喜 in conversation with my friends, and use 祝贺 when writing a card.
    2 points
  12. Thanks, it's quite encouraging to reflect on your progress. How do you figure on the 435 ch/m? I was thinking I could work it out based on how long a book takes and the character count, but I hadn't actually done the math. Saw something on that page that I think reflects on my state of Chinese literacy; in the FAQ they say "For many native speakers, recognizing characters is the primary obstacle in their literacy. For many non-native speakers who've crammed a bunch of hanzi flashcards, recognizing characters often does not mean understanding the word or sentence. For example, you may recognize "下" and "摆" but not understand that "下摆" means "hem"." I didn't remember the character "摆" or the word "hem" (guess that doesn't come up much in murder mysteries) but looking up "摆" in Pleco I see that I know a large number of the words that contain that character. I'm not sure if they're saying I should cram some flash cards, but they might be saying that
    2 points
  13. 2 points
  14. so the conversation is like : you : "你是说你要买宠物还是要生孩子吗?" she replied, "还有两周左右,我的第一个孩子将要出生." then you replied, "太好了!恭喜你!" right? I think it's okay. If she were my friend, I might replied, "恭喜你将要得到一个温柔可爱的兔宝宝!" 😁
    2 points
  15. This is actually a word I encountered quite early on my Chinese journey, thanks to this!
    2 points
  16. 寶玲 for Pauline, Paula. This is a simple and very common name. And the 玲 screams a female name 霖 is commonly used in male names
    2 points
  17. @nocturne-- >>"I started learning Chinese a few days ago and I have been really enjoying." The early dropout rate is astronomical. Anything that makes it fun and induces you to stay around past those first few days and weeks is worthwhile. ---------------------------------- Plenty of room for more than one opinion. When I had a tutor early in the game, which in my case was a face-to-face native-speaking tutor, I found it very helpful to be able to ask questions that were not an official part of the lesson plan. Things that dealt with daily life in China, how Chinese people thought and felt. Even though we focused on the "core skills," these extras made it all come alive and helped me learn in a useable, practical way. The human interaction kept it from running the risk of becoming a sterile, boring intellectual exercise. Doubtless every learner has his or her own favorite approaches. And, to be honest, I'm not sure it matters much in the first few days or weeks. What I do think matters at that stage, however, is having the material presented in a manner that you find engaging. A manner that is fun and "ropes you in" and motivates you to continue beyond the bare-bones academic basics. A manner that instills a love of the language and a respect for the people speaking it.
    1 point
  18. Not sure if anybody has mentioned 狂飙, it seems to be really popular at the moment. I've watched five episodes so far (out of around 40 total) and the quality seems to be pretty good overall. One of the main characters is played by the actor who plays the father in 隐秘的角落, and the general feel of it seems similar too since it's a crime type drama. Would definitely recommend so far. https://baike.baidu.com/item/狂飙/57027307?fr=aladdin
    1 point
  19. Questions have come up in several threads about visas for China travel now that the ban has officially been lifted. Lots of second-hand information has been circulating, often from bloggers who are quoting other bloggers. Today I found something on the subject from "the horse's mouth." Notice on the Adjustment of Requirements for Chinese Visa Application(Updated in January , 2023)
    1 point
  20. A lot more choices here: https://m.mox.moe Make sure to download MOBI files instead of EPUB if you plan to read on Kindle. I’m not sure the Kindle screen has a high enough resolution for some of these files, though. I personally use an e-reader made by Boox that’s the size of an iPad.
    1 point
  21. One of these popsci guys (Steven Pinker maybe?) observed that UN documents when translated to Chinese were 75% of the size (in bytes) and thought he had discovered something amazing and revolutionary about language. In fact he'd just discovered something about computer science, ie if we assume that Chinese and english have a one to one correspondence in syllables, then a syllable in English will usually take 3 or more characters, which are 8 bits long and 3*8=24 . Chinese syllables are typically represented with a single 16 bit character. So we can see that every syllable should be 8 bits larger in English. Very simple, very easy It may not be 100% accurate, but you can understand why the documents would have to end up larger in English.
    1 point
  22. Wow, thanks for the explanation. Working backwards from the 10m characters I get about 383 hours of reading, which pretty much corresponds with what I thought I could acheive. This whole thing was motivated by the realization that time was the crucial variable I was missing in my Chinese learning. As I recall from Steven Kaufmann he studied Chinese for six months 8 hours a day as a full time job, and wouldn't you know but 25*40=1,000 hours. I also saw an interview with that youtuber who goes around NYC impressing people with his "perfect Chinese", and what did he say? He said he spent 2-3 years learning Chinese for an hour or more each day. So while I had been learning Chinese for many years, it was sporadic at best and certainly didn't add up to 1,000 hours. I can't really estimate, but maybe 200-400 hours, which is well short of the time you need to be profficient (If you take the FSI at their word that should be 1,200 hours for Chinese). At the beginning I calculated that I could probably put in about 400 hours if I used most of my free time for reading, and as I see from the 383 hours calculation, that's not far off (it was probably more hours because I was going slower in the beginning) Now, for more numbers.... I recall reading somewhere that some method was averaging about 12-15 words learned per hour, so if we use the high end of that then in 383 hours I should have learned 5,745 words. That corresponds with what CTA says about me having learned 10,000-15,000 words. Because I probably starte with 5,000 and added somewhere in the neighborhod of 6,000 words.
    1 point
  23. Yes, it does: https://www.zdic.net/hans/戀 It's not the most commonly used term so wouldn't be the first hit on a search.
    1 point
  24. @abcdefg just got the Chinese name from a website. Now you can do a better translation. 公司名称:陕西云飞盛翔商贸有限公司 注册地址:陕西省西安市莲湖区丰收路丰庆四季小区4号楼4单元301室
    1 point
  25. I think the main problem with this address is that it's Pinyin, with all the words run together without proper spaces separating them. Probably a machine rendering. Shanxi Yunfeisheng Xiangshan Mao Youxian Gongsi It's the name of a company and its address. It's located in Shanxi Province 山西省。Youxian gongsi 有限公司 means "Limited Company." Like "ABC Company, Ltd." The spaced numbers, 4 4 301 are probably a building number and a floor number and an office number. The number 710082 is the postal code (like US Zip code) and CN is for China. Best I can do. If you have it in Chinese characters, I or someone else might be able to help you more.
    1 point
  26. abcdefg >>>Found it challenging, especially the parts in the delivery room when the staff was excited, talking fast and wearing surgical masks. Challenging indeed. I remember the sentence at 4'20'' (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=78mYf5M9IGU&t=260s). 32 syllables in 4 seconds... From this episode I "extracted" about 700 words I didn't know. Did you know them all? Or almost all?
    1 point
  27. Average speaking speed is said to be around 250cpm. So 1.75 * 250 = 435. Empirically, I've listened to a lot of audiobooks, and 250cpm is pretty close to what I've measured as the speed, the few times I've done it. E.g. sapiens (non-fiction) on youtube is at 285cpm. I've listened to a wuxia novel 流星蝴蝶剑 at 200cpm. One of the Foundation novels (Asimov sci-fi) I've listened to on ximalaya is 245cpm.
    1 point
  28. Just to clarify, when someone is having a baby, especially their first one, their entire world changes. They may experience radical changes to their career, housing, family relationships, medical status (physical and mental)... everything. This is putting aside the time you spend simply researching things, shopping, being sick, and going to medical appointments. Also 坐月子 needs preparing for. With this backdrop, responding to random messages is just so insignificant. I'm not saying she coincidentally entered labor just that minute, and she's incapable of replying. She's just busy.
    1 point
  29. https://www.iflyrec.com/ has got human transcription for 1.34rmb/min of audio, their AI is even cheaper and pretty good too. If you get it done with AI you could post on the forum and get people to help check as a joint learning activity, I'd probably be interested in helping if the content was interesting.
    1 point
  30. Not sure, but somehow I feel that saying 太好了 is a bit odd in this situation. Probably need a native speaker to comment.
    1 point
  31. For 1. I expect it is literally eating anything that moves; if it's four years plus after the Anti-rightist campaigns it will be into the famine years around the Great Leap. For 2. it's literally something like, "when we discussed the affairs of men, the colour/expression on our faces changed" with the suggestion it's drained of colour due to fear, you can see an example here: 奥威尔《动物庄园》法则:动物善良,谈人色变 - 知乎 (zhihu.com) and the original phrase it's adapted from 谈虎色变 谈虎色变_百度百科 (baidu.com). I note another common adaptation that came up when I searched was 谈性色变 where it's looking awkward at the mention of sex rather than out and out fear. In your context it's a time of great fear of other men and what they might do to you/each other and with the mention of other beasts you can see how swapping tiger for man makes sense. 色 is often facial expression in early texts, there's a Confucian thing about keeping your countenance set when serving your lord/parents, https://baike.baidu.com/item/色难/ i.e. not looking resentful when you do your duty.
    1 point
  32. You can report your own post and ask a moderator to delete it. If it doesn't interfere with the flow of the discussion, we usually do. Happens mostly with accidental double posts.
    1 point
  33. There are some expressions that do not sound very natural. But as I'm using my phone, it's kind of hard for me to give you any examples. Personally, I wouldn't use it for learning Chinese before I become an advanced learner.
    1 point
  34. It'd be 山羊. PS: But I think sheep would do, too.
    1 point
  35. Maybe some more food for thought. I checked my copy of "Outlines of Chinese Symbolism and Art Motives" by C.A.S. Williams. Under sheep it says:"The goat is one of the six artificial animals and was undoubtedly known in China long before the sheep, which was a later importation called the "Hun-goat" 胡羊." So maybe they used goats originally and later also used sheep. Just my uninformed guess though. The book is also quite old, so maybe this isn't quite cutting-edge science. Still fun to try to look up stuff like this.
    1 point
  36. chāo'ǒushī puppeteer. The funny thing is that I don't know how to write that chāo. X偶师, obviously, but Pleco doesn't give me any chāo that looks likely. Picked up when interpreting for a Taiwanese hand puppet show company. They later talked about who in the company could actually chāo, which was not everyone: some people focused on sound, or directing, or etc. So-and-so can chāo, but this other person can't chāo. Edit: Turns out it's a hypercorrection for cāo'ǒushī 操偶师!
    1 point
  37. Ovine does refer to sheep, the corresponding term for goats is caprine, so both John Wayne and I bow to superior scholarship... But my experience, and my belly, cry out for goat, both in your translation and on my restaurant plate, even though Indonesian is similarly ambiguous: dictionary kambing is "sheep or goats," but in Southeast Asia, in menus to table, goat predominates. Just my gustatory opinion... TBZ Edit: For those who care, both of you, I just found a separate word for sheep in Indonesian that I've never heard in my life: domba... And kambing biri-biri in Malay... John Wayne and I are equally being humbled and edified by this little question. We both thank you from the soles of our boots...
    1 point
  38. I've got a copy of Animals Through Chinese History Animals Through Chinese History. Earliest Times to 1911. Edited by Roel Sterckx, Martina Siebert, and Dagmar Schäfer. pp. xii, 277. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2019. | Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society | Cambridge Core and it seems to suggest sheep there; the section on Shang sacrifices translates yang as sheep though in other essays in the compilation it's rendered as "sheep and goats". On page 31 this section: has a rare character meaning pen-reared sheep that doesn't seem to be in my character sets, 羊 with a 冖 above. Elsewhere it says goats remained a more northern livestock animal, so if your city is in the south expect that would also make them less likely. ETA The only direct reference to 三牲 rather unhelpfully says: "In classical texts, and in practice until Song times, the three victims were a bovine, an ovine and a pig" keeping it vague.
    1 point
  39. abcdefg, China is not completely open yet. Still not open to tourists. Im guessing it will open in the summer though. Last summer they finally opened borders for students. Some came but not many, its still quite expensive to fly to China.
    1 point
  40. In my experience, transcribing an hour of audio usually takes more than an hour of real time. I'd like to suggest an alternative. Here is the method that I am currently using to get transcripts. This method does not produce perfectly accurate transcripts. If you could find another willing learner to allocate the amount of work to make one correct transcript, I think that should also be feasible and get you results you want faster.
    1 point
  41. Just keep at it. In Welsh, we would say "Dyfal donc a dyrr y garreg." ("It's steady tapping that breaks the stone.") Don't give up.
    1 point
  42. I did an image search with the keywords "三牲 牛 羊 猪" and almos all images show a goat. Besides I also would have chosen the goat before making the search because I think this animal is more present in Chinese tradicional culture; for instance I am thinking in the animal depicted in images related with 羊年.
    1 point
  43. Watched the first two episodes last night and I must say I am impressed so far for the following reasons: The director is not afraid to let a scene play out slowly and properly build tension. I feel like most Chinese shows are appealing to the lowest common denominator and are deathly afraid of their audience being bored if “nothing" is happening. A cast that seems to be hired for their acting ability/suitability for a certain role and not their looks or 流量 Sticking closely to the book so far, no sign of any filler etc (at least as far as I can remember, it has been a while since i read it) Already looking forward to continuing watching tonight. I'm exited to see how they handle the cultural revolution stuff, how much will be changed/cut etc. So far I wouldn't hesitate to recommend it to western viewers who has no special attachment or interest in China, which I would almost never do for a Chinese TV show. Of course it is a bit too early to give a proper judgement after only two episodes, lots of time to screw it up still 😅
    1 point
  44. Congrats! 10m chars in a year is quite an achievement as is being able to read at 1.75x listening speed, which is approx 435 characters per minute. I don't know of a good online vocab test, but here's a good online character count test that estimates your # known chars in about a minute. http://hanzitest.ericjiang.com/ I scored 4300 just now, and I have ~4600 chars in my flash cards, so it's pretty accurate for me, considering I'm sure I forgot a few chars from my pile.
    1 point
  45. Despite much threatening to quit this language, I've managed to not totally do it. I'm about 50% of the way through 草房子 by 曹文轩. I'm enjoying the story about growing up in rural China from the different perspectives of the people who live in the town. It's also right at my level, in terms of reading. I finger over words on my Kindle about once per page, but find I can get pretty much the entire plot even without lookups. At this rate, I'll probably just keep plugging away at 曹文轩 novels until I get bored of them - not like I'll be done with this one any time soon.
    1 point
  46. I encountered this word in Zhihu today, and I thought it was amusing. It ultimately means "pet owner:" 铲屎官
    1 point
  47. Well these questions all kind of coincide with eachother. The basic answer is I use my Kindle Paperwhite, but recommend the wechat reading app "微信读书“ instead. There are a few more details to that answer The problem with most TTS is that it sounds bad, robotic, and not easy or pleasurable to listen to. I've owned and used Kindles for years. I have an old Kindle 3 (from 2010) with a headphone jack and as I recall it did English TTS and after installing a Chinese firmware called "Duokan" it was able to do Chinese TTS (but it sounds horrible) I forget the exact progression, but I've tried lots of ways to do more reading. I found a font that has pinyin baked in and installed that on my Kindle to read with, and newer kindles have a pinyin function built in. I got a 2018 Kindle paperwhite and started buying some books from amazon.cn and realized it had the ability to do text to speech and it was very listenable. unfortunately this functionality isn't available for Kindles not registered to amazon.cn or for books sideloaded onto the Kindle... and rights holders can disable this functionality, which I realized later when I wanted to re-read the Harry Potter series. So because the Kindle couldn't do TTS on sideloaded books I looked for another solution because I have a large collection of Chinese books I downloaded from a torrent some years ago... I tried LingQ but it was kind of slow and clunky to do TTS, then I found a nice iOS app called "speech central" that uses the iPhones' built in TTS. I used that for a while, but the TTS voices are not very good quality and I found myself getting distracted by other things on my phone. So I really wanted the superior TTS of the Kindle, so took another crack at figuring out how the TTS on the kindle works. Long story short, you need a program called Calibre, and the KFX format tools from Amazon, and then you can copy over an identifying code (mobi-asin) from a book purchased on that Kindle to another book and make sure you convert that book to the KFX format, and finally you can send that to your Kindle over USB and it will allow you to read it with TTS... I would not reccomend this path unless you currently own a Kindle. A much better path is the Wechat reading app "微信读书“. Which has some pretty good TTS and a huge selection of books (that you can read for "free"? I don't really know they make money, haven't charged me anything yet...). Obviously you can use that app on your phone or tablet, but if you want the advantages of an e-ink device then the "BOOX Poke 4S" is only 699 RMB and unlike the Kindle it can run Android apps. So you could just install the wechat reading app and read and listen to books to your heart's content.
    1 point
  48. 大白 https://zh.m.wikipedia.org/zh-hans/大白_(网络用语)
    1 point
  49. Not a character, but a word: I recently learned 黑客, hēi kè, hacker. Does that count?
    1 point
  50. Looks weird in English but according to google "resp." is sometimes used incorrectly by German speakers when writing English as a literal translation of the German word beziehungsweise, to connect two words or phrases to indicate that they are basically equivalent to one another. So I would guess here it means capacity is 30,000 which is the maximum of 55% capacity. https://forum.wordreference.com/threads/resp.2167934/ https://ell.stackexchange.com/questions/6491/what-does-resp-mean-in-these-sentences
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...