Jump to content
Chinese-forums.com
Learn Chinese in China

Featured

  1. roddy

    roddy

    Administrators


    • Points

      24

    • Content count

      18,655


  2. Publius

    Publius

    Members


    • Points

      16

    • Content count

      622


  3. somethingfunny

    somethingfunny

    Members


    • Points

      15

    • Content count

      933


  4. Dandy Jiang

    Dandy Jiang

    Members


    • Points

      15

    • Content count

      25



Popular Content

Showing most liked content since 11/14/2017 in all areas

  1. 8 points
    First off, I'd like to welcome our first new moderators in.... years! @Lu and @陳德聰 have been getting used to how things work behind the scenes for a month or so now and are pretty much doing all the post approving / moving / deleting duties. This might mean some minor changes in what gets through the moderation queue, but nothing drastic, except perhaps improvements in response times in the Americas. Indeed as they've been doing this for a month already, you'll have noticed any changes by now. So thanks to them for offering to help out. And now that they're in place... Second: We should also have a small team of people in a volunteer / curator role. The tasks here would include: 1) Choosing content to be featured on the newer version of the homepage. The interface for this is quite straightforward, see the attached image. 2) Welcoming new members on-board. We've done this sporadically in the past, I'm hoping to get things running a little more systematically. By way of example, the poster here says she's studying in Nanjing. Right away that means she's got information which is useful to our members (Where? What's it like? So on). There are also topics she could be posting in right away (the fact that topic hasn't had a new post in six months shows the scope for improvement). Obviously not everyone is going to become a regular, but some will. Tools to aid this will include some kind of post-feed (like the new posts block on the homepage, maybe) including only posts by new members, highlighting posts by new members in topics, that kind of thing. Perhaps each new member automatically gets assigned to a volunteer, who gets a notification about their posts. Basically, I want to make sure the first posts by every new member are seen by someone who's thinking not just 'how do I answer this question' but also 'how do we make this person more likely to be here in six months'. 3) Similarly, encouraging existing members to contribute more. If someone mentions they're enjoying their new textbooks, suggest a write-up. If someone apologises for a late reply as they were on a trip through the Chinese countryside, suggest a trip report. The above is the top of the list and we can get started on this (enthusiasm permitting) by the end of the year, easily. There are other things I'd like to be doing in the longer term, but I'm going to leave those aside for now. If you're wondering what's in it for you - well, it's basically the above. If that's not the kind of thing you enjoy, continue using the site as you do currently. There'll probably be access to some more stats (tracking how we do on encouraging new members to stick around, for example) and definitely a private forum for volunteers and mods to discuss organisational stuff and post pictures of cats. If you enjoy the site and would like to help improve it and help others get more out of it, speak up. Don't worry if you're a relatively new member. I'm looking for, I guess, 5-10 people and it'd be nice to have a range of membership 'ages', and also people in different circumstances (eg, folk who are studying Chinese in China, at a university outside China, independently). If you're interested let me know. admin@chinese-forums.com Private Message or reply below. Questions and clarifications welcome. And don't forget to say hi to the new moderators! Edit: Changed the terminology to moderator, from admin. This is more accurate, we roughly have Admins: Me and Imron. Full server and back-end access, although Imron only uses his if I disappear. We can never be on the same plane. Mods: Our two new additions. Can approve, hide, delete, move, edit and generally toy with all posts. Can ban and warn members. Volunteers: None yet, role explained above.
  2. 8 points
    The first one, you can say “发呆”。 You can say “茫然”, it's an adjective. If you want a verb, you can say “茫然地+do sth.……” It depends on the context. You can say 盯着sb.(spoken) or 凝视sb(written language) You can say “生气地盯着sb.” or a word “怒视”。
  3. 6 points
    Kunming is best known for its flowering trees that begin blooming very early in spring, often defying light night frost to do so. But last week I found a fine blaze or two of fall color in another of Kunming's minor parks, this one called Lotus Pool Park 莲花池公园。It's easy to get to and free, virtually undiscovered by tourists, although enjoyed with great regularity by locals. I entered by a back way, having ridden the number 29 Bus, and the first thing I saw inside the gate was an elderly man practicing water calligraphy 水书法 on the slate paving stones of the open courtyard. I watched from a respectful distance and snapped a couple of discrete photos. The gentleman looked up and saw me, took off his hat and walked over. Was I going to be chewed out and reprimanded for invading his solitary space? Had I broken some unwritten rule? Rather gruffly he asked, "Can you read it?" I smiled and took a stab at doing so. The writing was very clear and precise, not really difficult to follow. I stumbled over one or two words, and he gave me appropriate prompts. He moved very close now, face to face, took off his dark sunglasses and hit me with the crucial follow up question, "But can you understand it? Do you know what it means?" Well, I floundered for 10 or 15 seconds before confessing my ignorance. "Do you remember when Liu Bei 刘备 met with Zhuge Liang 诸葛亮 before the founding of Shu Han 蜀汉 and they swore to...." Well, he was off on a rapid reprise of the history of the Three Kingdoms that was well over my head, though I did catch a reference to the evil Cao Cao 曹操 from the north, to which I nodded vigorously. What he had inscribed on the ground with his wet pen, had to do with these matters. He walked me up and down the two columns of rapidly disappearing characters, pointing with emphasis to some of them, wanting me to repeat those key terms out loud, perhaps so I would remember them better. Eventually, I told him I had to meet some other friends deeper inside. Thanked him, he wanted to shake hands, which I found a little unusual. Had I just become his disciple 徒弟? It's always a treat to meet a genuine enthusiast; someone who cares strongly about any given subject, and I had just unwittingly managed to do that. Good start to the day. The park is not so densely forested as to prevent glimpses of tall building nearby, easily seen through the coloring foliage. Night-time temperatures so far have not been below freezing, so the color change of the leaves has been subtle in most species. Parts of the park are high on a hill, while other surround a quiet lake. It is dotted throughout with small and medium sized gazebos where people gather to chat, sing, play music, drink tea and just enjoy being outside with nature. I was there on a weekday, so the park was not crowded. Games were available for kids. Here a stand sold plaster of Paris molds which children could paint wildly, expressing their creativity after first putting on a disposable artist's smock. Some people did slow solo Tai Chi 太极拳, like this gentleman, which to me looked more like a moving meditation than an actual exercise workout. Soon I found a bridge that crossed a stream which fed into the lake. Small footbridges like this are always a feature of Chinese parks, embodying "crossing over" symbolism as well as simple functionality. Supposedly this stream, and others, were once fed by strong springs. Now they are just a trickle, but the runoff from the lake still goes into Panlong River 盘龙江, snaking through the downtown part of Kunming. Volunteers, some with red arm-bands, netted debris out of the lake. One could rent paddle boats or slow-speed electric boats by the hour. Families posed by the water, snapping memory-album photos against the backdrop of the pagoda, which rose across another arched footbridge. I met 5 middle-aged ladies fashionably dressed and out for a walk, full of giggles and laughter, jockeying for flattering selfie positions on the low steps of the pagoda. I later briefly got roped into being their group photographer. A few patient fishermen had their lines in the water, protected by large conical bamboo hats. I didn't see any "big catch" action, in fact, I didn't witness even a nibble. A concessionaire had tables set up which provided a pleasant view. He would provide cards, Chinese chess 象棋, or ma jiang tiles 麻将 for a small fee. I sat a while and sipped a tall glass of tea. One could have green tea or red for 10 Yuan with a tall thermos of hot water off to the side for free refills. Pu'er tea cost a little more, because it needed actual brewing. I sipped a very decent biluochun 碧螺春 while listening to a small group of musicians rehearsing nationalistic songs off to my right. It was approaching lunchtime and I wanted to move on. Crossed a different bridge and exited at the main gate. No bus stops were handy for any of the lines that would take me where I wanted to go, so I rented one of the public bicycles for 1 Yuan and peddled away. Another pleasant small-scale taste of Kunming beauty. Life can be good here if you let it.
  4. 6 points
    So I decided to brush up my Wubi typing skills, and needed some text to practice with. First I used a novel, but it was too easy -- lots of common compounds, not really testing one's ability to break down characters. It seemed a classical text would be more appropriate for practice purposes. Then what would be more classical than San Bai Qian (三字經、百家姓、千字文) I thought. So I set out to find the text. Interesting thing is, there are many versions of San Zi Jing, no two of them are identical. For example, this and this are supposed to be the original Song version; and here a Qing version and a Republican version (they even changed 竇燕山, can you believe that?); this site has a simplified version complete with pinyin, but with too many errors and it dare call itself sanzijing.org. Another thing I didn't realize: there are many characters that have different pronunciations across the Strait. Check out these YouTube videos. The first one is the Republican version done by a group of children, very mesmerizing. The second one is the Qing version. The reader's accent is so perfect, I almost mistook her for a CCTV announcer. The only giveaway is where the Taiwan pronunciations differ from the Mainland's (can you spot them?). Okay, too much talking. Here's the text, the original Song version except one place I believe. Both simplified and traditional forms are given (the latter I typed using bopomofo, and a thought I had while typing: if bopomofo were the predominent input method, would we still have people asking "how important are the tones"? -- you can't even type without knowing the tones /grin). Different Taiwan pronunciations are marked with pinyin. The English translation is by Herbert Giles (taken from ctext.org). ====== rén zhī chū xìng běn shàn xìng xiāng jìn xí xiāng yuǎn 人之初 性本善 性相近 习相远    人之初 性本善 性相近 習相遠 Men at their birth are naturally good. Their natures are much the same; their habits become widely different. gǒu bú jiào xìng nǎi qiān jiào zhī dào guì yǐ zhuān 苟不教 性乃迁 教之道 贵以专    苟不教 性乃遷 教之道 貴以專 If foolishly there is no teaching, the nature will deteriorate. The right way in teaching is to attach the utmost importance in thoroughness. xī mèng mǔ zé lín chǔ zǐ bù xué duàn jī zhù xí 昔孟母 择邻处 子不学 断机杼    昔孟母 擇鄰處 子不學 斷機杼 Of old, the mother of Mencius chose a neighbourhood; and when her child would not learn, she broke the shuttle from the loom. dòu yān shān yǒu yì fāng jiào wǔ zǐ míng jù yáng 窦燕山 有义方 教五子 名俱扬    竇燕山 有義方 教五子 名俱揚 Dou of the Swallow Hills had the right method. He taught five sons, each of whom raised the family reputation. yǎng bú jiào fù zhī guò jiào bù yán shī zhī duò 养不教 父之过 教不严 师之惰    養不教 父之過 教不嚴 師之惰 To feed without teaching is the father's fault. To teach without severity is the teacher's laziness. zǐ bù xué fēi suǒ yí yòu bù xué lǎo hé wéi 子不学 非所宜 幼不学 老何为    子不學 非所宜 幼不學 老何為 If the child does not learn, this is not as it should be. If he does not learn while young, what will he be when old? yù bù zhuó bù chéng qì rén bù xué bù zhī yì 玉不琢 不成器 人不学 不知义    玉不琢 不成器 人不學 不知義 If jade is not polished, it cannot become a thing of use. If a man does not learn, he cannot know his duty towards his neighbour. wéi rén zǐ fāng shào shí qīn shī yǒu xí lǐ yí 为人子 方少时 亲师友 习礼仪    為人子 方少時 親師友 習禮儀 He who is the son of a man, when he is young should attach himself to his teachers and friends, and practise ceremonial usages. xiāng jiǔ líng néng wēn xí xiào yú qīn suǒ dāng zhí 香九龄 能温席 孝于亲 所当执    香九齡 能溫席 孝於親 所當執 Xiang, at nine years of age, could warm (his parents') bed. Filial piety towards parents, is that to which we should hold fast. róng sì suì néng ràng lí tì yú zhǎng yí xiān zhī 融四岁 能让梨 弟于长 宜先知    融四歲 能讓梨 弟於長 宜先知 Rong, at four years of age, could yield the (bigger) pears. To behave as a younger brother towards elders, is one of the first things to know. shǒu xiào tì cì jiàn wén zhī mǒu shù shí mǒu wén shì 首孝弟 次见闻 知某数 识某文    首孝弟 次見聞 知某數 識某文 Begin with filial piety and fraternal love, and then see and hear. Learn to count, and learn to read. yī ér shí shí ér bǎi bǎi ér qiān qiān ér wàn 一而十 十而百 百而千 千而万    一而十 十而百 百而千 千而萬 Units and tens, tens and hundreds, hundreds and thousands, thousands and tens of thousands. sān cái zhě tiān dì rén sān guāng zhě rì yuè xīng 三才者 天地人 三光者 日月星    三才者 天地人 三光者 日月星 The Three Forces are Heaven, Earth and Man. The Three Luminaries are the sun, the moon and the stars. sān gāng zhě jūn chén yì fù zǐ qīn fū fù shùn 三纲者 君臣义 父子亲 夫妇顺    三綱者 君臣義 父子親 夫婦順 The Three Bonds are the obligation between sovereign and subject, the love between father and child, the harmony between husband and wife. yuē chūn xià yuē qiū dōng cǐ sì shí yùn bù qióng 曰春夏 曰秋冬 此四时 运不穷    曰春夏 曰秋冬 此四時 運不窮 We speak of spring and summer, we speak of autumn and winter. These four seasons revolve without ceasing. yuē nán běi yuē xī dōng cǐ sì fāng yìng hū zhōng 曰南北 曰西东 此四方 应乎中    曰南北 曰西東 此四方 應乎中 We speak of North and South, we speak of East and West, These four points respond to the requirements of the centre. yuē shuǐ huǒ mù jīn tǔ cǐ wǔ xíng běn hū shù 曰水火 木金土 此五行 本乎数    曰水火 木金土 此五行 本乎數 We speak of water, fire, wood, metal and earth. These five elements have their origin in number. yuē rén yì lǐ zhì xìn cǐ wǔ cháng bù róng wěn wèn 曰仁义 礼智信 此五常 不容紊    曰仁義 禮智信 此五常 不容紊 We speak of charity of heart and of duty towards one's neighbour, of propriety, of wisdom, and of truth. These five virtues admit of no compromise. dào liáng shū mài shǔ jì cǐ liù gǔ rén suǒ shí shú 稻梁菽 麦黍稷 此六谷 人所食    稻粱菽 麥黍稷 此六穀 人所食 Rice, spiked millet, pulse, wheat, glutinous millet and common millet. These six grains are those which men eat. mǎ niú yáng jī quǎn shǐ cǐ liù chù rén suǒ sì 马牛羊 鸡犬豕 此六畜 人所饲    馬牛羊 雞犬豕 此六畜 人所飼 The horse, the ox, the sheep, the fowl, the dog, the pig. These six animals, are those which men keep. yuē xǐ nù yuē āi jù ài wù yù qī qíng jù 曰喜怒 曰哀惧 爱恶欲 七情具    曰喜怒 曰哀懼 愛惡欲 七情具 We speak of joy, of anger, we speak of pity, of fear, of love, of hate, and of desire. These are the seven passions. páo tǔ gé mù shí jīn sī yǔ zhú nǎi bā yīn 匏土革 木石金 丝与竹 乃八音    匏土革 木石金 絲與竹 乃八音 The gourd, earthenware, skin, wood, stone, metal, silk, and bamboo, yield the eight musical sounds. gāo zēng zǔ fù ér shēn shēn ér zǐ zǐ ér sūn 高曾祖 父而身 身而子 子而孙    高曾祖 父而身 身而子 子而孫 Great great grandfather, great grandfather, grandfather, father and self, self and son, son and grandson, zì zǐ sūn zhì xuán zēng nǎi jiǔ zú rén zhī lún 自子孙 至玄曾 乃九族 人之伦    自子孫 至玄曾 乃九族 人之倫 from son and grandson on to great grandson and great great grandson. These are the nine agnates, constituting the kinships of man. fù zǐ ēn fū fù cóng xiōng zé yǒu dì zé gōng 父子恩 夫妇从 兄则友 弟则恭    父子恩 夫婦從 兄則友 弟則恭 Affection between father and child, harmony between husband and wife, friendliness on the part of elder brothers, respectfulness on the part of younger brothers, zhǎng yòu xù yǒu yǔ péng jūn zé jìng chén zé zhōng 长幼序 友与朋 君则敬 臣则忠    長幼序 友與朋 君則敬 臣則忠 precedence between elders and youngers, as between friend and friend, respect on the part of the sovereign, loyalty on the part of the subject. cǐ shí yì rén suǒ tóng 此十义 人所同            此十義 人所同 These ten obligations, are common to all men. fán xùn méng xū jiǎng jiū xiáng xùn gǔ míng jù dòu jiù 凡训蒙 须讲究 详训诂 明句读    凡訓蒙 須講究 詳訓詁 明句讀 In the education of the young, there should be explanation and elucidation, careful teaching of the interpretations of commentators, and due attention to paragraphs and sentences. wéi xué zhě bì yǒu chū xiǎo xué zhōng zhì sì shū 为学者 必有初 小学终 至四书    為學者 必有初 小學終 至四書 Those who are learners, must have a beginning. The "little learning" finished, they proceed to the four books. lún yǔ zhě èr shí piān qún dì zǐ jì shàn yán 论语者 二十篇 群弟子 记善言    論語者 二十篇 群弟子 記善言 There is the Lun Yu, in twenty sections. In this, the various disciples have recorded the wise sayings of Confucius. mèng zǐ zhě qī piān zhǐ jiǎng dào dé shuō rén yì 孟子者 七篇止 讲道德 说仁义    孟子者 七篇止 講道德 說仁義 The works of Mencius are comprised in seven sections. These explain the way and the exemplification thereof, and expound charity and duty towards one's neighbour. zuò zhōng yōng zǐ sī bǐ zhōng bù piān yōng bú yì 作中庸 子思笔 中不偏 庸不易    作中庸 子思筆 中不偏 庸不易 The Zhong Yong was written by the pen of Zi-si; Zhong (the middle) being that which does not lean towards any side, Yong (the course) being that which cannot be changed. zuò dà xué nǎi zēng zǐ zì xiū qí zhì píng zhì 作大学 乃曾子 自修齐 至平治    作大學 乃曾子 自修齊 至平治 He who wrote The Great Learning was the philosopher Zeng. Beginning with cultivation of the individual and ordering of the family, it goes on to government of one's own State and ordering of the Empire. xiào jīng tōng sì shū shú rú liù jīng shǐ kě dú 孝经通 四书熟 如六经 始可读    孝經通 四書熟 如六經 始可讀 When the Classic of Filial Piety is mastered, and the "Four books" are known by heart, the next step is to the "Six classics", which may now be studied. shī shū yì lǐ chūn qiū hào liù jīng dāng jiǎng qiú 诗书易 礼春秋 号六经 当讲求    詩書易 禮春秋 號六經 當講求 The Books of Poetry, of History and of Changes. The Rites of the Zhou Dynasty, the Book of Rites, and the Spring and Autumn Annals, are called the Six Classics, which should be carefully explained and analysed. yǒu lián shān yǒu guī cáng yǒu zhōu yì sān yì xiáng 有连山 有归藏 有周易 三易详    有連山 有歸藏 有周易 三易詳 There is the Lian Shan system, there is the Gui Zang, And there is the system of Changes of the Zhou Dynasty; such are the three systems which elucidate the Changes. yǒu diǎn mó yǒu xùn gào yǒu shì mìng shū zhī ào 有典谟 有训诰 有誓命 书之奥    有典謨 有訓誥 有誓命 書之奧 There are the Regulations, the Counsels, the Instructions, the Announcements, the Oaths, the Charges; these are the profundities of the Book of History. wǒ zhōu gōng zuò zhōu lǐ zhù liù guān cún zhì tǐ 我周公 作周礼 著六官 存治体    我周公 作周禮 著六官 存治體 Our Duke of Zhou drew up the Ritual of the Zhou Dynasty, in which he set forth the duties of the six classes of officials; and thus gave a settled form to the government. dà xiǎo dài zhù lǐ jì shù shèng yán lǐ yuè bèi 大小戴 注礼记 述圣言 礼乐备    大小戴 註禮記 述聖言 禮樂備 The Elder and the Younger Dai wrote commentaries on the Book of Rites. They published the holy words, and Ceremonies and Music were set in order. yuē guó fēng yuē yǎ sòng hào sì shī dāng fěng yǒng fèng 曰国风 曰雅颂 号四诗 当讽咏    曰國風 曰雅頌 號四詩 當諷詠 We speak of the Guo Feng, we speak of the Ya and the Song. These are the four sections of the Book of poetry, which should be hummed over and over. shī jì wáng chūn qiū zuò yù bāo biǎn bié shàn è 诗既亡 春秋作 寓褒贬 别善恶    詩既亡 春秋作 寓褒貶 別善惡 When odes ceased to be made, the Spring and Autumn Annals were produced. These Annals contain praise and blame, and distinguish the good from the bad. sān zhuàn zhě yǒu gōng yáng yǒu zuǒ shì yǒu gǔ liáng 三传者 有公羊 有左氏 有谷梁    三傳者 有公羊 有左氏 有穀梁 The three commentaries upon the above include that of Gong-Yang, that of Zuo and that of Gu-Liang. jīng jì míng fāng dú zǐ cuō qí yào jì qí shì (cuò) 经既明 方读子 撮其要 记其事    經既明 方讀子 撮其要 記其事 When the Classics are understood, then the writings of the various philosophers should be read. Pick out the important points in each, and take a note of all facts. wǔ zǐ zhě yǒu xún yáng wén zhōng zǐ jí lǎo zhuāng 五子者 有荀扬 文中子 及老庄    五子者 有荀揚 文中子 及老莊 The five chief philosophers are Xun, Yang, Wenzhongzi, Laozi and Zhuangzi. jīng zǐ tōng dú zhū shǐ kǎo shì xì zhī zhōng shǐ 经子通 读诸史 考世系 知终始    經子通 讀諸史 考世系 知終始 When the Classics and the Philosophers are mastered, the various histories should be read, and the genealogical connections should be examined, so that the end of one dynasty and the beginning of the next may be known. zì xī nóng zhì huáng dì hào sān huáng jū shàng shì 自羲农 至黄帝 号三皇 居上世    自羲農 至黃帝 號三皇 居上世 From Fu Xi and Shen Nong on to the Yellow Emperor, these are called the Three Rulers. who lived in the early ages. táng yǒu yú hào èr dì xiāng yī xùn chēng shèng shì 唐有虞 号二帝 相揖逊 称盛世    唐有虞 號二帝 相揖遜 稱盛世 Tang and You-Yu are called the two emperors. They adbicated, one after the other, and theirs was called the Golden Age. xià yǒu yǔ shāng yǒu tāng zhōu wén wǔ chēng sān wáng 夏有禹 商有汤 周文武 称三王    夏有禹 商有湯 周文武 稱三王 The Xia dynasty has Yu; the Shang dynasty has Tang; the Zhou dynasty had Wen and Wu; these are called the Three Kings. xià chuán zǐ jiā tiān xià sì bǎi zǎi qiān xià shè 夏传子 家天下 四百载 迁夏社    夏傳子 家天下 四百載 遷夏社 Under the Xia dynasty the throne was transmitted from father to son, making a family possession of the empire. After four hundred years, the Imperial sacrifice passed from the House of Xia. tāng fá xià guó hào shāng liù bǎi zǎi zhì zhòu wáng fā 汤伐夏 国号商 六百载 至纣亡    湯伐夏 國號商 六百載 至紂亡 Tang the completer destroyed the Xia Dynasty, and the dynastic title became Shang. The line lasted for six hundred years, ending with Zhou Xin. zhōu wǔ wáng shǐ zhū zhòu bā bǎi zǎi zuì cháng jiǔ 周武王 始诛纣 八百载 最长久    周武王 始誅紂 八百載 最長久 King Wu of the Zhou Dynasty finally slew Zhou Xin. His own line lasted for eight hundred years; the longest dynasty of all. zhōu zhé dōng wáng gāng zhuì chěng gān gē shàng yóu shuì chè 周辙东 王纲坠 逞干戈 尚游说    周轍東 王綱墜 逞干戈 尚游說 When the Zhous made tracks eastwards, the feudal bond was slackened; the arbitrament of spear and shields prevailed; and peripatetic politicians were held in high esteem. shǐ chūn qiū zhōng zhàn guó wǔ bà qiáng qī xióng chū 始春秋 终战国 五霸强 七雄出    始春秋 終戰國 五霸強 七雄出 This period began with the Spring and Autumn Epoch, and ended with that of the Warring States. Next, the Five Chieftains domineered, and the Seven Martial States came to the front. yíng qín shì shǐ jiān bìng chuán èr shì chǔ hàn zhēng 嬴秦氏 始兼并 传二世 楚汉争    嬴秦氏 始兼併 傳二世 楚漢爭 Then the House of Qin, descended from the Ying clan, finally united all the states under one sway. The throne was transmitted to Er Shi, upon which followed the struggle between the Chu and the Han States. gāo zǔ xīng hàn yè jiàn zhì xiào píng wáng mǎng cuàn 高祖兴 汉业建 至孝平 王莽篡    高祖興 漢業建 至孝平 王莽篡 Then Gao Zu arose, and the House of Han was established. When we come to the reign of Xiao Ping, Wang Mang usurped the throne. guāng wǔ xīng wéi dōng hàn sì bǎi nián zhōng yú xiàn 光武兴 为东汉 四百年 终于献    光武興 為東漢 四百年 終於獻 Then Guang Wu arose, and founded the Eastern Han dynasty. It lasted four hundred years, and ended with the Emperor Xian. wèi shǔ wú zhēng hàn dǐng hào sān guó qì liǎng jìn 魏蜀吴 争汉鼎 号三国 迄两晋    魏蜀吳 爭漢鼎 號三國 迄兩晉 Wei, Shu and Wu, fought for the sovereignty of the Hans. They were called the Three Kingdoms, and existed until the Two Jin Dynasties. sòng qí jì liáng chén chéng wéi nán cháo dū jīn líng 宋齐继 梁陈承 为南朝 都金陵    宋齊繼 梁陳承 為南朝 都金陵 Then followed the Song and the Qi dynasties, and after them the Liang and Chen dynasties. These are the Southern dynasties, with their capital at Nanjing. běi yuán wèi fēn dōng xī yǔ wén zhōu yǔ gāo qí 北元魏 分东西 宇文周 与高齐    北元魏 分東西 宇文周 與高齊 The northern dynasties are the Wei dynasty of the Yuan family, which split into Eastern and Western We, the Zhou dynasty of the Yuwen family, with the Qi dynasty of the Gao family. dài zhì suí yī tǔ yǔ bú zài chuán shī tǒng xù 迨至隋 一土宇 不再传 失统绪    迨至隋 一土宇 不再傳 失統緒 At length, under the Sui dynasty, the empire was united under one ruler. The throne was not transmitted twice, succession to power being lost. táng gāo zǔ qǐ yì shī chú suí luàn chuàng guó jī 唐高祖 起义师 除隋乱 创国基    唐高祖 起義師 除隋亂 創國基 The first emperor of the Tang dynasty raised volunteer troops. He put an end to the disorder of the House of Sui, and established the foundations of his line. èr shí chuán sān bǎi zǎi liáng miè zhī guó nǎi gǎi 二十传 三百载 梁灭之 国乃改    二十傳 三百載 梁滅之 國乃改 Twenty times the thrown was transmitted in a period of three hundred years. The Liang State destroyed it, and the dynastic title was changed. liáng táng jìn jí hàn zhōu chēng wǔ dài jiē yǒu yóu 梁唐晋 及汉周 称五代 皆有由    梁唐晉 及漢周 稱五代 皆有由 The Liang, the Tang, the Jin, the Han, and the Zhou, are called the Five Dynasties, and there was a reason for the establishment of each. yán sòng xīng shòu zhōu shàn shí bā chuán nán běi hùn (hǔn) 炎宋兴 受周禅 十八传 南北混    炎宋興 受周禪 十八傳 南北混 Then the fire-led house of Song arose, and received the resignation of the house of Zhou. Eighteen times the throne was transmitted, and then the north and the south were reunited. shí qī shǐ quán zài zī zǎi zhì luàn zhī xīng shuāi zài 十七史 全在兹 载治乱 知兴衰    十七史 全在茲 載治亂 知興衰 The Seventeen Dynastic Histories are all embraced in the above. They contain examples of good and bad government, whence may be learnt the principles of prosperity and decay. dú shǐ zhě kǎo shí lù tōng gǔ jīn ruò qīn mù 读史者 考实录 通古今 若亲目    讀史者 考實錄 通古今 若親目 Ye who read history must study the State Annals, whereby you will understand ancient and modern events, as though having seen them with your own eyes. kǒu ér sòng xīn ér wéi zhāo yú sī xī yú sī xì 口而诵 心而惟 朝于斯 夕于斯    口而誦 心而惟 朝於斯 夕於斯 Recite them with the mouth, and ponder over them in your hearts. Do this in the morning; do this in the evening. xī zhòng ní shī xiàng tuó gǔ shèng xián shàng qín xué xí 昔仲尼 师项橐 古圣贤 尚勤学    昔仲尼 師項橐 古聖賢 尚勤學 Of old, Confucius took Xiang Tuo for his teacher. The inspired men and sages of old studied diligently nevertheless. zhào zhōng lìng dú lǔ lún bǐ jì shì xué qiě qín 赵中令 读鲁论 彼既仕 学且勤    趙中令 讀魯論 彼既仕 學且勤 Zhao, president of the Council, studied the Lu text of the Lun Yu. He, when already an official, studied, and moreover with diligence. pī pú biān xiāo zhú jiǎn bǐ wú shū qiě zhī miǎn xuè 披蒲编 削竹简 彼无书 且知勉    披蒲編 削竹簡 彼無書 且知勉 One opened out rushes and plaited them together; another scraped tablets of bamboo. These men had no books, but they knew how to make an effort. tóu xuán liáng zhuī cì gǔ bǐ bú jiào zì qín kǔ 头悬梁 锥刺股 彼不教 自勤苦    頭懸梁 錐刺股 彼不教 自勤苦 One tied his head to the beam above him; another pricked his thigh with an awl. They were not taught, but toiled hard of their own accord. rú náng yíng rú yìng xuě jiā suī pín xué bú chuò 如囊萤 如映雪 家虽贫 学不辍    如囊螢 如映雪 家雖貧 學不輟 Then we have one who put fireflies in a bag. and again another who used the white glare from snow. Although their families were poor, these men studied unceasingly. rú fù xīn rú guà jiǎo shēn suī láo yóu kǔ zhuó 如负薪 如挂角 身虽劳 犹苦卓    如負薪 如掛角 身雖勞 猶苦卓 Again, there was one who carried fuel, and another who used horns as pegs. Although they toiled with their bodies, they were nevertheless remarkable for their application. sū lǎo quán èr shí qī shǐ fā fèn dú shū jí 苏老泉 二十七 始发愤 读书籍    蘇老泉 二十七 始發憤 讀書籍 Su Lao-Quan, at the age of twenty-seven, at last began to show his energy and devote himself to the study of books. bǐ jì lǎo yóu huǐ chí ěr xiǎo shēng yí zǎo sī 彼既老 犹悔迟 尔小生 宜早思    彼既老 猶悔遲 爾小生 宜早思 Then when already past the age, he deeply regretted his delay. You little boys should take thought betimes. ruò liáng hào bā shí èr duì dà tíng kuí duō shì 若梁灏 八十二 对大廷 魁多士    若梁灝 八十二 對大廷 魁多士 Then there were Liang Hao, who at the age of eighty-two, made his replies in the great hall, and came out first among many scholars. bǐ jì chéng zhòng chēng yì ěr xiǎo shēng yí lì zhì 彼既成 众称异 尔小生 宜立志    彼既成 眾稱異 爾小生 宜立志 When thus late he had succeeded, all men pronounced him a prodigy. You little boys should make up your minds to work. yíng bā suì néng yǒng shī mì qī suì néng fù qí 莹八岁 能咏诗 泌七岁 能赋棋    瑩八歲 能詠詩 泌七歲 能賦碁 Ying, at eight years of age, could compose poetry. Bi, at seven years of age, could make an epigram on wei-qi. bǐ yǐng wù rén chēng qí ěr yòu xué dāng xiào zhī 彼颖悟 人称奇 尔幼学 当效之    彼穎悟 人稱奇 爾幼學 當效之 These youths were quick of apprehension, and people declared them to be prodigies. You young learners ought to imitate them. cài wén jī néng biàn qín xiè dào yùn néng yǒng yín 蔡文姬 能辨琴 谢道韫 能咏吟    蔡文姬 能辨琴 謝道韞 能詠吟 Cai Wen-ji, was able to judge from the sound of a psaltery. Xie Dao-yun, was able to compose verses. bǐ nǚ zǐ qiě cōng mǐn ěr nán zǐ dāng zì jǐng 彼女子 且聪敏 尔男子 当自警    彼女子 且聰敏 爾男子 當自警 They were only girls, yet they were quick and clever. You boys ought to rouse yourselves. táng liú yàn fāng qī suì jǔ shén tóng zuò zhèng zì 唐刘晏 方七岁 举神童 作正字    唐劉晏 方七歲 舉神童 作正字 Liu Yan of the Tang dynasty, when only seven years of age, was ranked as an "inspired child," and was appointed a Corrector of Texts. bǐ suī yòu shēn yǐ shì ěr yòu xué miǎn ér zhì 彼虽幼 身已仕 尔幼学 勉而致    彼雖幼 身已仕 爾幼學 勉而致 He, although a child, was already in an official post. You young learners strive to bring about a like result. yǒu wéi zhě yì ruò shì 有为者 亦若是            有為者 亦若是 Those who work will also succeed as he did. quǎn shǒu yè jī sī chén gǒu bù xué hé wéi rén 犬守夜 鸡司晨 苟不学 曷为人    犬守夜 雞司晨 苟不學 曷為人 The dog keeps guard by night; the cock proclaims the dawn. If foolishly you do not study, how can you become men? cán tǔ sī fēng niàng mì rén bù xué bù rú wù 蚕吐丝 蜂酿蜜 人不学 不如物    蠶吐絲 蜂釀蜜 人不學 不如物 The silkworm produces silk, the bee makes honey. If a man does not learn, he is not equal to the brutes. yòu ér xué zhuàng ér xíng shàng zhì jūn xià zé mín 幼而学 壮而行 上致君 下泽民    幼而學 壯而行 上致君 下澤民 Learn while young, and when grown up apply what you have learnt; influencing the sovereign above; benefiting the people below. yáng míng shēng xiǎn fù mǔ guāng yú qián yù yú hòu 扬名声 显父母 光于前 裕于后    揚名聲 顯父母 光於前 裕於後 Make a name for yourselves, and glorify your father and mother, shed lustre on your ancestors, enrich your posterity. rén yí zǐ jīn mǎn yíng wǒ jiào zǐ wéi yì jīng 人遗子 金满籝 我教子 唯一经    人遺子 金滿籯 我教子 惟一經 Men bequeath to their children coffers of gold; I teach you children only this one book. qín yǒu gōng xì wú yì jiè zhī zāi yí miǎn lì 勤有功 戏无益 戒之哉 宜勉力    勤有功 戲無益 戒之哉 宜勉力 Diligence has its reward; play has no advantages. Oh, be on your guard, and put forth your strength.
  5. 6 points
    Congratulations @Lu and @陳德聰. I just hope your new admin duties don't limit your ability to continue with your excellent posting!
  6. 6 points
    Today a foreign friend asked me:“Why do Chinese say 吃醋-eating vinegar instead of 吃酱油-eating sauce?” 今天一位外国朋友问了一个很有意思的问题:“在汉语里为什么吃醋?不吃酱油?” 1. What does “吃醋” mean? 【吃醋 chīcù】 a metaphor be jealous (usu. of a rival in love): 2. Why do we use “吃醋” mean be jealous? According to legend, the word was related to a historical personage, whose name was Fang Xuanling. He was a prime minister in the Tang Dynasty. The emperor Li Shimin gave Fang Xuanling several beauties as his concubines because of his contributions to the court. 相传这跟中国的一位历史人物有关。他的名字叫房玄龄,是唐朝的一位宰相。由于房玄龄为朝廷做了很大的贡献,皇帝李世民赏赐给他几个美女作妾。 Fang's wife was so jealous and sad that she strongly disagreed. The emperor asked her furiously:"Do you want to live without jealousy or die with jealousy?" 房玄龄的老婆又嫉妒又伤心,坚决不同意。皇帝非常生气,问她:“你是想丢掉嫉妒心活着,还是想带着嫉妒心去死?” She answered without hesitation:"I'd rather die with jealousy." 她毫不犹豫地回答:“我宁愿带着嫉妒心去死。” So the emperor sent a secretary with a pot of poisonous wine to her. She took it over without a word and emptied the pot with one draught. 于是,皇帝派人送了一壶毒酒给她,她一句话都没说,接过来毒酒喝得干干净净。 At last, she wasn't poisoned. It turned out that what the emperor gave her was vinegar, not poisonous wine. And the emperor didn't want her to die, but wanted to test and frighten her. 结果她并没有死。原来皇帝给她的不是毒酒,而是醋;皇帝也不是真的让她死,而是想考验、吓唬她一下。 Since then, people use “吃醋” to mean jealous. 从此以后,人们就用“吃醋”这个词表示“嫉妒”。 3. 为什么是“吃”不是“喝”? In ancient Chinese, 吃 meant both eat and drink. For example: 吃酒=drink wine; 吃茶=drink tea. 在古代汉语中,“吃”的意思是eat, 也是drink。 比如:吃酒、吃茶。 4. 这个词在生活中怎么用? We often use this word in spoken Chinese. For example: 在口语中,我们常常用“吃醋”这个词。比如: -Don't always talk to her! I‘m jealous! -你别老跟她说话,我吃醋了! -Why are you jealous everyday? -你怎么每天都吃醋啊? -I'm jealous just because I like you! -我吃醋是因为我喜欢你啊!
  7. 5 points
    Just as a little follow up on this, cracked open the bottle this evening with a good dinner and 九品芝麻官, HK slapstick movies and vintage baijiu officially a recommended combination. Happy to say this baijiu is actually not bad at all, it's definitely got a kick to it like a supermarket bottle of vodka, but pleased to say it doesn't have any 'xiang' flavour which I personally can't handle. All in all, there is some good baijiu out there, if I find/get given more I'll post a follow up
  8. 4 points
    @Dandy Jiang, Very, very informative answer. No muss, no fuss, direct to the question, and very useful... Coincidentally, I was just looking for one of the examples the OP asked for, myself. Thank you both. It may be a bit presumptuous of me, but I m gonna ask you to please feel free to answer other questions of this nature in the future. We have an intrepid band of regular responders, but I, for one, feel we can always use a few more. Thanks again. TBZ
  9. 3 points
    This has been an awesome week, and I felt like I really learned a lot. First of all, for some reason I am still unable to upload photos. I have sent Roddy a message and so hopefully by next week I can put some up. I got my reading/writing midterm back, and it turns out I actually did write 容 correctly, and I got 100%! Obviously I am over the moon with that, but it led to something even more cool. There were 9 of us who did really well on the midterm, and so our teacher said that after looking at our results, attendance, and homework each week, we don't need to attend class between now and our final exam in January if we don't want to. She said we are welcome to come, but our time is probably better spent devising and studying our own 内容。 She said we obviously still need to take the final exam, and we need to make sure we cover what's in the book as that will all be on there. Each week we have to send photos via Wechat showing that we have been studying, and we have to produce 3 paragraphs/articles each week, on whatever we choose. We can either send photos of those to her, or leave them in the classroom the night before and she will correct them for us (I am definitely doing the latter so that I actually continue to learn). I am really pumped about this. The remaining Hanzi in the book that will be on the final are fairly common, and so shouldn't take long to learn. Most of them I can read, I just need to remind myself how to write them. But it means I have more time to study personal vocabulary, and writing the articles will be really fun and allow for a lot more experimentation with new words and grammar. Finally she said after our final exams she will reassess and let us know whether she wants us to return to class, or we can continue to do our own thing. I just started a thread on sentence structure, so I won't repeat it here, but one of our teachers gave me a brilliant revelation when he was teaching this week - basically, if we know general sentence structures (subj + v + obj) and all that, then when we discover a new word, in most cases we can work out how to use that word by just checking what type of word it is. I have always struggled with this when looking up words in the dictionary! Now it seems so simple, why on earth was I finding it so hard, I should have just checked what kind of a word it was and then I would know how to put it into a sentence! I spent some time hanging out with my friends at the tattoo place on Friday which was fun. They wrote me a list of vocabulary as I walked around the shop pointing out things I didn't know, and then trying to explain things. I think (I haven't actually checked them all in the dictionary yet though) I managed to get outline and shading, which I was quite proud of, or at least I will be if they are right hah! Aside from Chinese study, the weather here has been getting very cold. Today was -16C, which is the coldest it has been so far this winter. There has also been some snow which is nice! Some rather unfortunate news is that we may have to move house. Our landlord is letting us know by the end of this month whether or not she wants to sell the place (I naively just assumed we'd be here for 4 years). It's annoying because this place has 3 bedrooms which is perfect with our kids, the location is also fantastic. It's not too far from uni and we are right by a big supermarket and a great kindergarten for the kids. The silver lining is that our contract is up mid-Feb, so we will most likely move in January, right in the middle of my holiday! I think I will stop there for this week, before the post gets too long!
  10. 3 points
    30% linen 亚麻 70% viscose 黏胶
  11. 3 points
    I want to encourage you by saying that what you feel is totally normal. After about an year of full time study, I still felt like my listening skills were terrible. In class I felt like I could understand my teachers fairly well, but once I went outside to the real world, I was so discouraged because I felt like I couldn't understand anything. For me I think it was partially getting used to a variety of accents and to the listening speed. One specific thing I did in my third semester was to follow @imron's advice and really double-down on my listening practice. I systematically worked through all the intermediate and upper-intermediate ChinesePod material. I also did a lot of listening to iMandarinPod and worked through their elementary and intermediate material. After six months I definitely noticed a jump in my listening comprehension. Somehow for me I felt like by making a conscious decision to really focus on one specific skill (i.e. listening) for six months and "neglecting" other skills, it really made a difference. In reality my Chinese improved overall, but I was really happy with the progress I made in my listening.
  12. 3 points
    Maybe look at PopupChinese, but I wouldn't worry too much about Chinesepod - if the worst thing people say about your Chinese is that you have a Taiwanese accent, you're doing great. And I suspect it's not that much of an issue anyway. Chinese people love to tell you nobody else speaks Chinese properly. I'd get a textbook. Get the CDs. Work through it systematically for two hours, and spend the other two hours doing whatever you feel is necessary and fun. Watch kids cartoons, read a graded reader, do an online language exchange. Set yourself a goal of testing out of a level or two of Chinese when you get to China. Oh, and if you do remember your old account we can merge them.
  13. 3 points
    The confusion would have been avoided for those characters, but then when you have to write characters with a horizontal rather than vertical structure and nobody can tell what your 立日心田心 is...
  14. 3 points
    Flippant answer: it doesn't make the sentence past tense, because the sentence is in Chinese, which doesn't have a past tense. Less flippant: I think 到了 can always be explained as a 'change of situation': Previously we had not arrived, but now we are arriving. You can often translate it as past tense, but that's just because that's the way we say it in English/Dutch/other languages, not because it is inherently past tense. Indeed, it's often said just before the train/taxi/plane actually comes to a halt, so in a way it should be future tense. Anecdote, I forgot who told me this story or whom it happened to: A man, beginner of Chinese, is in China and wants to take a bus. He comes to a bus stop. When does the bus come? he asks someone waiting there. 啊,车到了, exclaims the lady. 了, that means it's past tense, the man thinks, recalling his textbook. That's too bad, the bus has come and I missed it. So he walks off.
  15. 2 points
    Hi, I actually had an old account I posted on here with but my old laptop died and I can't remember the account name or email address - the joys of having thousands of different email accounts ;). I went on an exchange to Beijing in the middle of the year for a month after having learnt Chinese for ~8 months. My experience with my Chinese was terrible; I couldn't read menus, people were only able to understand basic sentences (like 'do you have...?') and it took me several minutes to process what people were saying to me. I was by myself for the first 10 days before the course started and I actively sought out interactions with the locals, I had a heap of fun just cruising around getting into my photography and attempting to chat with people. I'm going back to China in March next year as I was awarded a CSC scholarship - one of the 1 year language learning ones. I'm getting a new laptop tomorrow and want to start studying again, I have 4 hours a day. Previously I used iTalki; I would get lessons however they would be conducted in a mix of English/Chinese, using a method similar to Flickserve I would take the recorded audio from the lessons and form flashcards for key phrases in Anki. In addition to this I would smash through 30-60 minutes of flashcards a day; once I finished my Anki deck I would work on Skritter, which had a range of different words that I had seen around and wanted to learn. I also tried to run through 1 Chinesepod lesson a day, I would listen to the audio over and over again and try and transcribe it until I began to understand what was being said. I don't think aspects of this approach have been effective for me for these reasons: (1) the iTalki lessons are expensive and I didn't get much speaking practice and cutting it up into flashcards took hours and hours to do properly, (2) I ended up knowing a lot of phrases that were only applicable to specific contexts, and which are difficult to draw upon in stressful situations (a similar case for the Skritter lists), (3) one of my mates from mainland had a look at the Chinesepod content and he thinks it is best as a resource only for Taiwan (this is probably true but I think the grammar structures and stuff would still be alright), (4) I ended up just memorising what was being said in the Chinesepod dialogues even though I was convinced I was actually understanding it - if I heard different iterations or variations on the sentences being spoken I would doubt I actually understood it at all. I actually don't know what to do. I took a 3 month break after returning from China as to be honest I was quite disheartened, and also to focus on my last semester of uni + GAMSAT and I really want to get my Chinese up to a decent level before I get back over there next Feb. What are your thoughts on how I should attack my next few months? Is there an equivalent to Chinesepod based on northernish-style speaking?
  16. 2 points
    Hi edelweis! Yeah, it is a bit convoluted, but I'll try and elucidate a bit. Current law in China is that all foreign made cosmetic products, with the exception of soap and toothpaste, must be tested on animals in Chinese labs before it can be marketed on the Chinese high street at the expense of the foreign manufacturer (i.e. they have to pay for the tests). If the product was made in China, the manufacturer can avoid the problem of pre-market animal testing - leading to some manufacturers having set up operations there. However, an unfortunate thing is that these products are then subjected to post-market testing where products will be taken from store shelves and then submitted to animal testing. This led to companies' like Burt's Bees recent withdrawal from the Chinese market. They didn't have to pay for the tests themselves, but they found that the tests were still carried out, so they pulled out. (Insert thumbs up emoji here!!) Foreign manufacturers know that this situation exists in China and so have to make a decision: money or ethics. A potential customer base of multi millions or declining to submit animals to unnecessary torture. Many companies have chosen the money and so many consumers in other countries won't buy from them anymore. If a foreign product is sold on the Chinese high street, it *will* have been tested on animals in Chinese labs, which also carry a poor reputation for humane standards..... That probably answers your 2nd question and maybe sheds some light on the first. Animal testing is banned in many countries and Chinese law requires only that the importer gets their products tested in China for sale on the Chinese physical market (bizarrely, these laws don't apply to online sales whether the product is bought via a Chinese or a foreign website), and, as the manufacturers have to pay for these tests, it's unlikely they would do so if they weren't interested in the Chinese market. Does that make any sense?? Not sure if I've been clear. All the best.
  17. 2 points
    Publius

    2B

    2B = 二逼 (逼 is a stand-in for another character 屄 'cunt', which is considered too dirty visually. I didn't know this character until a college classmate told us, with juvenile glee, about it.) Basically 二 means stupid. But 二逼 is milder than 傻逼. Here's some explanations: https://baike.baidu.com/item/二逼 站有站相,坐有坐姿 means she behaves like a normal person, not eccentric or something.
  18. 2 points
    (Brushing off the dust on this old topic) Looks like the English translation of Jin Yong's "Condor Trilogy" is soon to be published - or should I better say 'start being published'. This article has some interesting information and good links. The "Lord of the Rings" of Chinese literature is finally being translated into English There are several other threads in this Forum mentioning Jin Yong (Louis Cha), here are a couple Wuxia (aka martial art or kungfu) novels by Louis Cha Best kung fu novel ever?
  19. 2 points
    Hey guys, So I had a question regarding the general switch from writing top to bottom, to going from left to right. Does anybody know why this change was made? As I was studying today I actually thought how much easier it would be if it was still top to bottom. Firstly I was looking at my homework, and the teacher hadn't understood my sentence. I had written ‘腿坏’,but because my writing is very sloppy, my 坏 had a big space, and so it actually looked much more like ‘腿土不’ (bonus points if anyone can tell me what that means in Chinese hah)! Similarly, as I was learning and writing out 站牌,my 牌 wasn't good, and I found it really hard to keep it all together. The whole thing just looked like one big mess, which could easily have been construed as 立 占 片 卑!Again, bonus points for anyone who can translate my newly made idiom! If, on the other hand, I had been writing from top to bottom, even though each character might not have been written perfectly, all confusion would have been avoided. Maybe some characters could still be confused if written from top to bottom, but surely it would be less than left to right. Of course I know that this wouldn't be a problem for natives, but my problem just got me thinking. So, why was the change made?
  20. 2 points
    I used to do a bit of water calligraphy myself (I'll have to see if I can find some pictures of my 'work') and the understanding part you describe was always stressful. I wish I could do some now with my increased knowledge of Classical Chinese. To my shame, I even remember someone having to explain the meaning of 君 to me. I once had a conversation with someone doing some water calligraphy and his advice was that it didn't matter if you didn't understand it, you just find a style you like, buy a 字帖 and then write it out fifty times. By the end, you would have amazing calligraphy skills and you would have absorbed the meaning. I thought this was actually quite a good illustration of the foundations of Chinese educational philosophy. It's more of an ability precedes understanding system, rather than the typical Western understanding precedes ability. But that's a conversation for another day.
  21. 2 points
    It also depends what degree you study. Come to the UK and do a masters degree in Teaching English as a Foreign Language and I'd say your prospects are not noticeably increased. Come to the UK and do an undergraduate degree in Civil Engineering and you're probably looking like a good prospect. Some universities run 2+2 or "direct entry" programmes where you spend two years at a well-known Chinese university followed by two years in the UK. I don't know much about the job prospects, but I imagine they're pretty decent. So, I'd say that studying in the UK doesn't automatically guarantee better employment, which is roughly similar to UK students not being guaranteed a higher salary just for having gone to university. The specific course and the university play a much bigger role. Like all such things, those who have a clear idea of what they want to do and tailor their educational path to this will be more likely to succeed. As for why there are so many students coming to the UK? I'll be cynical and say it's that there are a lot more people in China who think it will guarantee their children better employment and have the money to spare. "My son didn't get into Tsinghua, so I'm going to send him to University of the Arts London so he can fulfill his dream of being a fashion designer." Good luck with that. There are a lot of Chinese students on UK university campuses, and a lot of them shouldn't really be there, which is a shame, because some of the are absolutely fantastic.
  22. 2 points
    Hi, I answer your questions: 1) Yes, we do: teachers have to upload all their documentation in their private area in order to get listed, so we can easily check them. We also have collaborators from many countries, including China (in fact we have Chinese contents on our website) so this help us to check even better the validity of a document in other languages. On our site, teachers cannot hide their qualifications and the place where they obtained them, wheras in other sites they can, so we think that this help to avoid any possible lie about that, since teachers fill in on their own all the data taking resposiblity for it, but anyway, as stated above, we have all the original documents. Maybe soon we could give teachers the option of showing directly the document on their profile, of course hiding sensibile data; 2) considering that they are free, we thought 15 minutes to be the right amount of time, the trial lessons is intended more to see how the site works and get to know a teacher before booking a full hour lesson (students have 3 free trial lessons), take also into account that now we pay the teachers for the free trials, but maybe in the future (we are still assesing this) it'll be up to them to give a free trial or not, and many we already know don't like the idea. Moreover, remember you have also a 10 USD gift from us (which by the way for this forum users become 20) so while the trial lessons last only 15 minutes, with the other 10 USD you can easily get another 30 minutes free or even 1 hour, depending on the teachers fees; 3) the basic function are the same for every site of this kind, you cannot invent much. I'm very passionate about languages so I don't hide the fact that over the last 5 years I attended many websites where I could speak with teachers and tutors of several languages. Of course, I did not say I had a great idea, since it's nothing new, but now the site has just been launched, it has only the basic functions, so it may look very similar to others, but soon there'll be other functions which we planned by ourselves. It's only too normal to make what one knows well and has experience about, but you are always going to add your personal touch.
  23. 2 points
    If you’re a non-native speaker it’s highly highly unlikely the school can get you a residence work permit these days. As for converting a visa within China, that also seems very hard. It’s also not happening in Hong Kong anymore either. I know two people of different nationalities who came on tourist visas fairly recently with the promise of “converting” them and they’ve just been messed around. “Come quickly, asap! ... Welcome to China! ... We need to extend the visa... oh... there’s a delay, go to HK to get a new tourist visa... oh... it looks like we can’t do it, go back to your home country and apply there.” As for non-native speakers working for agencies or what-not, it’s a tough life. Often work way more hours for a lot less pay and no benefits. I overheard a women from El Salador in the local police station recently saying she gets paid 3k a month with a bedroom in an apartment. She said if she is late for work or misses a day, they deduct her whole weeks pay. I worked with someone from an agency who’s circumstance were a lot better than that but they still had to work 6 days a week.
  24. 2 points
    The X character is likely 號 (judging by context and the shape of the bottom right corner). Can't say anything about the others. Too worn-out.
  25. 2 points
    Sounds like you are doing OK. You study 8 months and find out real immersion is difficult. That is normal. I can imagine doing the same for French or Spanish would be easier but not for Chinese. You may want to analyse carefully which area you want to strengthen - listening skills, speaking skills or reading. Listening skills, my experience is you need to put in a much greater proportion of time into this. I used Growing Up with Chinese, ripped the sound to MP3, carefully matched the subtitles to the sentence in workaudio book. The dialogue is by Beijing people so that gets you used to Beijing style of speaking. For instance 多少钱 was pronounced as 多儿钱. I experimented shadowing it, saying it in a conversation with a language partner living in Beijing and they said "wow, that sounds totally native" - alas, only happened for three words out of the whole conversation, Lol. But overall, I found the exercise gave quite a large benefit. Haven't tried Chinesepod. See https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/44952-workaudiobook-–-a-tool-for-listening-practice-and-subtitle-creation/ I did intend to do the same for Happy Chinese and Susan series but got lazy. That's Beijing accent and the script is on the Internet. We have a thread on it in Chinese forums. https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/51745-srt-subtitles-for-happy-chinese-with-susan/ There was another drama I had difficulty with listening to and people on this forum said the actor used a Beijing way of slurring words together and dropping words which I found largely incomprehensible. It's ok, work on easier stuff first and go back to it later. For your italki lessons, it sounds like your level was still quite low if they also used English. I notice that tutors tend to speak closer to standard mandarin during a session which is not a great thing if you drop into street style fast spoken and slurred Beijing mandarin. In fact, I found this quite a difficult problem to solve. Most teachers would revert closer to standard mandarin. So somehow, you have to convince a tutor or language partner to really speak the local accent, you record the sentences and listen again. Using anki to train listening skills didn't work for me. For testing, it is fine but training is different. I found it much better to have sentences in an MP3 and just keep playing. You can start off with ten sentences and just keep auto repeating them. You can even shuffle the sentences. Pick another ten for the next day and so on. Then go back and review the first batch. As you get used to the sentences, you can increase the number of sentences to just above whatever you think you can handle. You cannot do this type of training with anki because of needing to press the button each time changing cards which slows you down. Listening to the mp3 is something you can do on the train, bus etc. There is also a type of file which you can include text with an mp3 so that it pops up karaoke style with the sound. I haven't investigated it much but it sounds like an avenue to explore. For example, listen to the mp3, can't comprehend a particular sentence, review, look at the screen for the words, shadow the sentence. Saves looking up the words. Reading menus - you have to get a real menu and learn how to read those particular words. Since the food and writing are different from your home country, you cannot expect to just drop in and workout what you want to order. Did you take any photos of menus from your previous trip? You can learn the words of selected dishes, perhaps writing the words out for reinforcement, and how to speak them in preparation for the next trip. Get a language partner friend to say the names of dishes into a MP3 recording for you. The other day, I found a new Taiwanese 饭店 and couldn't work out a lot of the menu. So I just asked the waitress for a recommendation and luckily, it turned out to be edible. At other food places in HK, I can actually read a lot of chinese menus. So don't worry too much about not being able to read menus. Speaking. Drill the sentences that you want to say. It may take a couple of hundred attempts to say a sentence with the correct rhythym, intonation and tones. The only thing is, will you understand the replies thus it goes back to the listening skills. Hence the necessity for more time on listening practice. The previous suggestion of a phrase book is good. I assume that you are are continually working on pronunciation and tones. I prefer to work on them in the context of a sentence. Don't worry about not being able to speak much in a conversation. Just have a good bank of sentences for common use that you can parrot off fairly smoothly and then work from those as a basis to other sentences. There are a number of apps you can try. Not sure how good they are. Maybe if you are very beginner then the majority will have some elementary use. I think designing a good app is quite hard given the divergent interests of different users.
  26. 2 points
    Look carefully at how you're going to get the money out of the country. I don't know what the rules are now, but back in my day you couldn't do it without showing a contract, taxes paid, etc.
  27. 2 points
    I'm sceptical about how much can be drawn from that scientific study. Raise a child from birth in a world where all text is arranged vertically and then if they're still slower reading vertically rather horizontally, I might believe it.
  28. 2 points
    Kayres, I'm sorry, but I've been seeing this get harder and harder for years and years. At some point, it's going to become impossible. Even if you find somewhere, it might last a year and then you need to leave. Good luck, but... You're not missing something . It is really fishy.
  29. 2 points
    Thanks to everyone who's been in touch about this - got about half a dozen expressions of interests, which is decent. Will be next week before we actually get anything started, so plenty of time for anyone else.
  30. 2 points
    I have never thought Chinese songs would be useful considering the tones are usually sacrificed for the tune. IMHO it might be okay for vocab but not much else.
  31. 2 points
    Poor 林蛋大 and his teacher would disagree.
  32. 2 points
    I'd thought it was a typesetting change and this wiki article seems to suggest it was computerised typesetting that hastened the shift but that it had started already (reading this article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horizontal_and_vertical_writing_in_East_Asian_scripts). This bit was interesting: Also says the PRC mandated the change in the mid-50s.
  33. 2 points
    Yeah, that character has a really difficult/complex etymology. I asked Ash about it. Here's his response:
  34. 2 points
  35. 2 points
    It would help other people with similar dilemmas.
  36. 2 points
    OP might not be American, and might not have the means to study in America. Also, China is currently right on the forefront of AI research so it's not an unreasonable option for someone looking to build up both their knowledge in the field *and* their Chinese domain knowledge.
  37. 1 point
    I remember learning this way too. We used to just point at random things on the menu and see what we'd get.
  38. 1 point
    Some of the students come partly because they want to get away from certain negative aspects of life in China. I know a number of by now naturalized citizens of my country that fall into that category. That number is probably matched by the people I know who were happy to return to China.
  39. 1 point
    Anther wonderful glimpse into the wonderful place Kunming and indeed China is. Thanks for your efforts. I am not an angler but those that are that I know tell me its not just catching the fish, its sitting in lovely surroundings listening to the sounds of the wildlife and looking at the wonderful natural things around you. In fact any fish my friends catch go back and for them it seems like just a good excuse to escape the "wife and kids" or those DIY jobs that are waiting.
  40. 1 point
    I'm working on an old Chinese style square stool with woven soft cushion trying to find it's 1.information about style, period, and other aspects related for restoration including. 2.deciphering two stamps on the legs likely to be Shop Stamps to obtain more clues for searching. any kind of help or suggestion would be appreciated 1st image : I've tried deciphering myself as xxx 「壽 but not sure」記 xxx 2nd image as 萬「張 but not sure coz there is a straight vertical line on the right part」豐 X 老店 Thank you in advance
  41. 1 point
  42. 1 point
    A lot of work has definitely been put into this, I'm currently 背ing 千字文 and am planning on doing 三字經 at some point, only worry is getting the tones wrong when reciting, thanks for posting
  43. 1 point
    If you're genuinely interested, download 网易云音乐 and search 'ktv', go to the bar labelled 「歌單」and there are lists of all your most commonly heard 'ktv' songs that run into the hundreds (thousands perhaps). But be warned, the vocab really is very very limited, and you will only learn how to talk about true love, bros for life, little apples and the like. I like getting into a new culture through the music as well, but because of the way ktv works (ie. Have a drink and belt out the same old songs you all know the words to), you're not really learning much in the end. Throw in the tones problem and you'll find using songs as a study aid is not really that viable. That being said, music can definitely supplement your studies. When I'm reading boring newspapers I'll stick on some 宋冬野 (recommended if you like quiet folk/alternative, maybe bon iver, that kind of thing) or 蛋堡 (chill jazz sampling hip hop) and it helps put me in a good mood without breaking the language atmosphere. Have fun exploring, just remember to learn your tones and practice some other greetings aside from 好想你
  44. 1 point
    I think I have read somewhere that there are cases where it is both.
  45. 1 point
    Can't believe it's still going! Good work on keeping up the logs everyone! I've been absent from the forum for quite a while now. I've been expanding the school at work and we're about to open a Chinese Language branch within the next few months so been extremely busy! As for studies, I've decided to go the Zhejiang University (hopefully) next September to study their 4 year Chinese Bachelor degree. I'm currently in the prepping stage. I'm trying to fit in as much study as I can these days, but probably only getting close to 30-60 minutes a day. Aside from that I'm speaking a lot more to parents at my school. They used to always speak English, but recently they've discovered I can speak Chinese so now more and more are happy to approach me to have a chat. I don't know why I never spoke more before! My adult learners are actually using Glossika to practice English, so it's nice that I can use the Chinese to get them to say the English. I've not really studied grammar in a long, long time, but something's just clicked. Anyone else had that? Recently I've been sending messages to my wife to check my messages/emails are correct. For a while I thought she was just glancing at what I wrote and saying 'Yeah, it's fine', but when I asked her honestly she said they were all correct. It's nice to see progress in a real life situation!
  46. 1 point
    I definitly regret not sticking to a proper textbook from the start, due to bad memories from boring textbooks from my Spanish class back in high school. I tried to make use of various apps and services, some really good, but following a proper textbook after having set up goals and a schedule for lessons/week, would have allowed me to properly track and manage my Chinese learning, and given me a better focus than what I used to have. In addition to the vocab they're teaching you, make sure to work on memorising the HSK word lists. HSK1-4 terms are absolutely essential. After that you can choose to purposedly studying the HSK 5 word list and then later the HSK 6 world list, or you can trust that your next textbook material will naturally introduce words on them anyway.
  47. 1 point
    >>" ...and everything else was ok." The "everything else" should have included testing for gonorrhea and chlamydia. Basic screening for these is usually done with quick tests at the time of your initial visit (i.e., while you wait for results.) Clamydia = 衣原体 yiyuanti Gonorrhea = 淋病 linbing Syphlis = 梅毒 meidu AIDS = 艾滋病 aizi bing Venereal disease/Sexually transmitted disease = 性病 xingbing Hepatitis is common in China and can be spread by unprotected sex. Hep C = 丙型肝炎 bingxing ganyan Hep B = 乙型肝炎 (usually abbreviated 乙肝 yigan)
  48. 1 point
    And wear a condom during sex. Especially now that you might infect others. There's lots of stuff you can get and pass on besides AIDS. Did the hospital test for any of that?
  49. 1 point
    Keep in mind that there is a window period for HIV testing from 10 days to 3 months depending on the type of test done (see here for more info). So if you have been exposed very recently, you may still need to go back in 3 months time for another set of tests even if this first test comes back negative, and you can still pass the virus on during this time if it turns out you do have HIV even if you had an initially negative result. Unfortunately this may make the next 3 months quite nerve-racking, but I hope everything works out for you.
  50. 1 point
    So in the end, you got a skill and a badass jacket! Win-win! I don't think my story's as inspiring as most of you guys'. Having taken very little interest in languages in high school, I decided at the ripe old age of 19 that being monolingual sucked, and embarked on an epic journey of self-studying... Russian. The choice of language was largely random, but I seem to remember my thought process being along the lines of "it's more impressive than Spanish or German, but not as difficult as Chinese". Two years later, my Russian was still terrible, but I'd well and truly caught the "language bug". At that time, I lived in a shared house with a constantly-changing roster of foreign students living there. These included a French Swiss girl and a group of Burmese sushi chefs, who inspired me to dabble in French and Burmese respectively. Later, a Mandarin-speaking Taiwanese girl moved in, so naturally I started learning Mandarin, with traditional characters. I think the fact that I had a crush on her was what inspired me to be a bit more 认真 with the Mandarin than I had been with any of the other languages I'd tried (though in the end nothing happened between us). Anyway, I became more infatuated with the language than the girl, and when she moved away I continued to study, eventually enroling in some classes at my university to supplement the self-study - at this point I switched to learning simplified characters, as the course was taught using simplified. At some time during this year (大三 on a three-year course), I decided I wanted to get serious about the whole Chinese thing, and started looking for jobs in China. I graduated with a good degree (helped in no small part by the grades from that Chinese course, which was aimed at a very low level and thus was easy marks for someone putting in decent self-study hours), and was accepted for the first job I applied for. And... One and a half years later I'm still here, and plan to stay for a good while.
×