Jump to content
Chinese-forums.com
Learn Chinese in China

Featured

  1. realmayo

    realmayo

    Members


    • Points

      14

    • Posts

      4,297


  2. roddy

    roddy

    Administrators


    • Points

      14

    • Posts

      21,151


  3. abcdefg

    abcdefg

    Members


    • Points

      10

    • Posts

      7,141


  4. Miko869

    Miko869

    Members


    • Points

      8

    • Posts

      35


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/19/2022 in all areas

  1. @Miko869-- I respect your opinion but have had a different reaction to recent events. ------------------------------------- The main appeal of China for me was in living there, getting to know the people, going to interesting places, doing interesting activities, learning about the food and the tea in a hands-on, participatory manner. So a closed China, one that necessitated my hasty retreat to the US was not at all welcome. And the prolonged border closure which followed was equally disappointing. My "China Life" crumbled. I now have much less incentive to learn the language. I studied Chinese history and culture as a way to better understand the land and its peoples. It also gave me some common ground when making friends. It wasn't something abstract. I had a very dear girfriend for 5 or 6 years. She couldn't leave the country with me. I miss her terribly and we have by now drifted apart. I've had to release her and urge her to go on with her life, since it's doubtful I will ever be able to return. It would be unfair to ask her to wait for me. All of which underscores the well-known fact that all of us are different. I wish you the best in your language and culture pursuits. I have been in mourning, and am just barely becoming optimistic about life again, as China fades into the rear view mirror.
    8 points
  2. I've put the audio for Talks on Chinese Culture 中國文化叢談 on dropbox, you should be able to download it from here: https://www.dropbox.com/s/vv5nn3gen15h57r/TOCC.rar?dl=0 Let me know if it matches the textbook that you have.
    6 points
  3. I decided to give up Chinese when I arrived at level 4 HSK. There were several reasons: 1) The efforts put in studying Chinese had been enormous, and all I had in my hand was only an elementary/intermediate-low reading and speaking ability: there is a huge gap between level zero and HSK4, a lot of things to get acquainted with, but at the end I was not able to read a newspaper, a website or understand TV shows. It was very disappointing, and I began to think that if I had put the same efforts in something else, my career would have benefited more. 2) The teaching material created in mainland China is quite boring, a lot of melodramatic stories or texts written just to teach students new words: I started not to tolerate it anymore. 3) A lot of people start to learn Chinese because they think it will change their career, but arrived at HSK level 4, you not only understand that this will not happen, but also that to speak Chinese fluently you have to sell your soul to the devil and all those efforts will never be repaid. 4) China lacks soft power, a rich, free and democratic pop culture, famous pop writers like Murakami etc. : all those things that keep students motivated in learning a language even if they understand that their career will not benefit from it. Why should I continue to learn a language if there is no interesting material to consume? 5) Chinese textbooks are not adequate to bring students from the intermediate-low level (hsk4) to the advanced level. You can't apply the same methodology for beginner, intermediate and advanced students: real spoken and written chinese (advanced chinese) has so many peculiarities, is so different from English, French, German, Spanish and Italian, that for European and American students that method simply doesn't work. I think Chinese publishers should start to create new materials with the aid of European and American experts (real experts, we do have teachers that, even them, do not speak Chinese fluently, they have created some textbooks but with the same flaws of those printed in China). When we arrive at the intermediate level, because our abilities are so poor, we understand that it's not our fault but that something with the "method" is wrong, and then we give up. That's my story. It happened at level HSK4 and not before because 1200 words is a sort of saturation point, before you're not so tired, after you not only start to feel that you need to rest, but also you begin to understand the reality: no wonderful jobs, a very difficult language, poor teaching material, political problems etc. etc. After 5 or 6 years I started to study Chinese again, here my motivation: 1) I started to think that I was wasting all the efforts spent to arrive at level HSK4. 2) I started to use textbooks created in Taiwan or in the United States. 3) I started to get involved in some aspects of Chinese culture: writers like Gao Xingjian, Zhang Ailing, Ling Shuhua, Bai Xianyong, Chinese history, ancient Chinese paintings, Contemporary Chinese urban culture, Chinese movies (Wong Kar-Wai is one of the best directors) etc. 4) I've bought a lot of textbooks to get an explanation and a guide for all those points that, as a European language speaker, I need to focus on in order to speak (and understand) advanced Chinese. 5) I understood that, with very advanced Chinese, some career opportunities (not so many) could arrive, but it's only a hope, not "the reason why" I'm learning Chinese. 5) Sometimes I still struggle as some news about China are not so reassuring, in particular when I hear about violation of very basic human rights I have the desire to stop studying Chinese and switch to Japanese. 6) As I struggle to keep motivated, just to give one example, when my Chinese friends tell me that Wong Kar-Wai is not a Chinese director, too "westernized" for them, or for the party, who knows. Then I look to modern Chinese cities and I don't understand why architecture can be westernized, but only Chinese directors that make films dealing with Chinese history have to right to be praised in mainland China.
    5 points
  4. A lot of what @Miko869 wrote resonated with me. In the beginning I got mildly interested in China when I began working for a partly Chinese owned company and got to more or less frequently interact with people in our Chinese office. When I had a chance to visit our office there for ten days a few years ago, I thought the people were great and that it would be fun and useful to learn the language along with more about the country ,expecting more visits soon. Having previously learned Japanese to more or less fluent, with virtually zero benefit in professional life, I expected Chinese to be something different. Now I'm still on that path, having been waiting for the next chance to visit Shanghai since Covid began, but getting more and more disillusioned and beginning to struggle liking China. What began as a curious different approach to handling the pandemic, has now suddenly turned into also giving me personal grief at work, which itself is nothing compared to watching literally everyone I care about over there getting their lives turned upside down in a senseless, completely avoidable, debacle with no end in sight. In short, I'm getting numb and cynical, just like the third Chinese person within the last couple of weeks to tell me today that they had stopped watching news and waiting for things to get better. Now I'm not just rethinking my relationship with China, but also my whole career path, since I realize that one big reason for me to stay in my current job for the last couple of years has been the promised future projects in China. But I'm not willing (or of the opinion that it is even possible) to do them remotely from here or to wait for China to maybe open in the next five years. Maybe I'll take on another interesting opportunity (not involving China), that I've been putting off in order to go to Shanghai, keep studying Chinese on the side, and go spend some time in Taiwan next year. Maybe that will lead to new work opportunities involving the language sometime in the future too. I can't keep waiting for China forever. Have to move on.
    5 points
  5. There a quite a few phrases like this in Chinese, including the more comical 先进性教育 which was mandatory learning for various government officials several years back.
    5 points
  6. Could we not have the unnecessary keyword-spam links to your own site? Looks tacky for everyone and calls into question your motivation for posting.
    4 points
  7. I bought some new books recently and don't think most of them have been mentioned here. They make up what's now called the 'How to Read Chinese Literature' series, either written or edited by Zong-qi Cai. How to Read Chinese Poetry (2008): Goes through each poetry era/style with lots of translated poems. A decent survey of Chinese classical poetry, whether you can read Chinese or not. Mentioned previously on these forums. How to Read Chinese Poetry Workbook (2012) A companion to the first book but for people who are learning to read Chinese poetry, so pinyin, vocabulary and modern Chinese translations accompany a new set of 100 Classical poems and their English translations. How to Read Chinese Poetry in Context (2018) Essays, all in English, on poetry from antiquity to the Tang. If you study western literature in the west you'd expect to read stuff like this. How to Read Chinese Prose (2022) Lots of classical Chinese prose pieces translated into English and then discussed, for what they mean, why they're so good etc. Don't need to be able to read Chinese. How to Read Chinese Prose in Chinese (2022) This is a kind of companion, for people studying Classical Chinese: more texts (and some that overlap), but this time the original Chinese text is the focus, with vocab and grammar notes as well as translations into modern Chinese and English. How to Read Chinese Drama (2022) Don't have this but seems to be an introduction/appreciation and anthology to Chinese drama, no Chinese required. Of these six books, three are subtitled "A Guided Anthology": How to Read Chinese Poetry, How to Read Chinese Prose, and How to Read Chinese Drama. I would say that How to Read Chinese Poetry Workbook and How to Read Chinese Prose in Chinese are the companions to the anthologies, for people who know some of, or are studying, the Classical language. That leaves How to Read Chinese Poetry in Context, which seems to be more designed to give you a thorough and almost more academic grounding in Chinese poetry and poetics. Early days cos I only bought most of these recently but I'm really happy to find so much material in English that's designed to give a real understanding of Chinese literature (rather than simply saying this is a famous poem and this is what it means). The two prose books in particular are a revelation! More details here: http://cup.columbia.edu/series/how-to-read-chinese-literature. And amazon lets you 'look inside' so see a preview.
    4 points
  8. Shanghai is down to about 500 new cases a day now, so it's going down, little by little. The government has early June as a target for starting to re-open, and everything is supposed to be fully open again by the end June. I take these dates with a grain of salt though, no point getting excited yet. I'm personally still stuck in my apartment (70 days now? lost count), but somehow my mood is better now. I guess humans really can adapt to almost anything.... It's now possible to order some take-out food etc, but options are still limited. Quite bizarre actually, e.g. I can get coffee from Luckin Coffee, but I can't for the life of me buy stuff like potatoes. My 小区 has gone two full days without a case now, which is huge! We've basically had cases everyday since the lockdown started,but still a looong way away from 14 days without no cases. For those who are interested: you can actually look up addresses online and see the case history at https://chenfan.info/ Some 小区's which haven't had cases in a while are now allowed to go out for a limited time. The rules are ad-hoc as always though, but it's usually restricted to one person per apartment, one time a day/a week, and for 2-3 hours. Still, much better than nothing. What worries me know are basically: The likelihood of case numbers going up again when we start slowly opening up and how the government will react. Will they start shutting down large areas again as soon as we get cases? Can we even get cases down to 0-ish without keeping a full lockdown? Beijing has been trying to control for a month now without being able to reduce the number of cases, measures there are just getting stricter and stricter. How will "life" be when we re-open? How much restrictions will be be burdened with for the rest of the year? I already see other cities in China basically preparing to live with a constant stream of 48-hour covid tests to be able to do anything.
    3 points
  9. Shaoxing wine, Chinkiang (Zhenjiang) vinegar, sichuan peppercorns. Actually, let me check Ching-he Huang's Chinese Food in Minutes, which is great for convincing people you learned to cook Chinese food in China, when in actual fact you ate out all the time and barely made sandwiches at home. She has a store cupboard list, this is just the stuff on it I have actually used... fermented black beans* (豆豉). Dried baby shrimp. Quality jasmine rice. Rice vinegar. There's more on the list (dried tangerine peel?), but I haven't made use of that, or only buy stuff for specific recipes rather than keep it on hand. Also, have a look at the hardware - you obviously don't need the Chinese-style rice bowls and spoons, but they can be fun. You might want a bamboo steamer (personally I got rid of mine, metal three-tier one is easier for doing veg over rice, etc). And stock up on jars of spicy goodness like these, you can just stir those into rice or noodles and bang, delicious. * The black bean sauce here has been a great success, don't need to use it in that specific recipe.
    3 points
  10. If you don't mind me making some small corrections...
    3 points
  11. I made a transcript (hopefully I haven't made any mistakes I've made some mistakes; corrections are in subsequent posts):
    3 points
  12. I lost my wife to a terminal disease a year before Covid began. As a consequence of border closures, I've not been able to visit my in-laws or take our son with me to see his grandparents, for over three years now. Even if the borders were to reopen tomorrow, I'd still be wary of visiting in case we can't get out. We used to travel back and forth multiple times a year, and were a very close family, with my career implicitly depending on China becoming more connected with the rest of the world, which is something I also thought was fundamentally unstoppable. I'm aware I was very lucky to get involved with China when I did, in a different era, which made it possible to have experiences that this generation of students may never know. These days I live a bit like a Chinese expat, watching the news, reading books and cooking Chinese food for myself. Even my work experience has become somewhat less relevant as the consensus view is becoming that China might be "uninvestable". I don't mind reinventing myself, it's just that it sometimes feels like the past has been a dream, and I'm the last person on Earth who remembers it for what it was. Not sure what I'd do if I were a student now: given I also find most of the enjoyment in actually talking to people, I might pick another one.
    2 points
  13. Hey everyone! I'm a software/ML/computer vision engineer by trade and I've spent some time building an OCR subtitle extraction algorithm for videos, and made them accessible through a browser extension. My goal is to make available pretty much any video of interest online, whether on Youtube, Netflix or chinese sites like Bilibili. As of now I'm working only with Youtube though. You can download it here, and find short installation/user guide here. For now it's what I would consider this "beta" software, and it's Chrome only and requires manual installation. The current list of processed shows can be found at browse.zimu.ai. The list is pretty short right now but I'm processing new videos every day. As you probably know, there are quite a few similar extensions for soft subs (which are also supported naturally), but I'm trying out a slightly different concept/philosophy for the subtitles. The idea is we want to display the minimal yet sufficient information such that a learner can understand the content in a reasonable time frame. From the start, the pinyin, hanzi and word translations are visible for all words. Gradually you can hide information you know, but new unknown words are thus visible by default, hopefully keeping you in flow. If you keep learning until all the subtitles are completely hidden, viola, you're fluent! At least that's the idea. But, naturally everyone is free to use it as it suits best, I've tried to keep enough settings to make it flexible to use. The extension comes with the standard Anki CSV file export. You can export the usual basic or cloze notes, but I've also added the ability to export the JSON of the whole containing sentence, along with dictionary info, so that you can build very advanced cards in Anki if you wish (example cards are provided in the guide). That said, (deep) knowledge tracing has been a research interest of mine for quite a while and I do see a big potential in minimizing the amount of time we spend in SRS by helping us encode memories more efficiently, and use inter-card dependencies to improve the scheduling. Therefore at some point I'll probably take a stab at an embedded SRS. As for funding, I'm making this browser extension available for free. I'm putting as much functionality as I can client-side (in the browser), and optimizing for low cost so that each additional user has very low marginal cost. For full disclosure, my philosophy here is to try and reach and provide something useful to as many people as possible, and try to find other ways to support it financially rather than a subscription or locking important features behind a paywall. That might be Patreon donations, selling the OCR as a SaaS, or even VPN/affiliate ads on the browsing site (not in the extension). So, are there any cool Youtube videos or channels with hard subs (or soft) you've been wanting to watch? Any and all feedback is warmly welcome! Hope you find it useful!
    2 points
  14. Hi, I don't know if you're still interested in that textbook, but I have now a copy on my desk, and as I think ICLP textbooks, but in general textbooks from Taiwan, are a good (if not the best) investment, I'll share my experience with you. "Aspects of life in Taiwan" is a collection of essays about Taiwanese society (themes like "male-centered society", "brain drain", "台灣人 like Phoenicians" etc.). All the texts are not edited for language learners, quite old (the book, at least the edition I've bought, was published in the '90s), but I think extremely enjoyable if you're interested in social sciences (the first essay, for example, has been written by a Taiwanese politician, expert in economics). You have a text, a list of new words or literary patterns (some new words are not listed as they want you to develop the ability to guess the meaning of unknown words both from context and from characters), and some questions for discussion. The greatest benefit of studying this textbook is that you will get acquainted with the so called 文白夾雜, a mix of modern standard Chinese and Literary (or classical) Chinese patterns, quite common in academic essays, especially in Taiwan; in addition you will have to struggle with rather complicated sentences and reasoning: the unsaid sometimes is more important than what is said to understand the author's point of view (I often understand all the words, but sometimes find it difficult to understand the details of the argument presented). The level is quite the same with "The independent reader" (B2+/C1 CEFR or Advanced High/Superior ACTFL), but I would say "The Independent Reader" is a bit more difficult just because it has longer texts (and then more unknown words, chengyu...) and the topics are more varied, in particular while "Aspects of life in Taiwan" deals with a lot of themes you should be familiar with if you have studied "Talks on Chinese Culture" and "Thought and Society", "The Independent Reader" has some rather new topics. Both the textbooks, "Aspects of life in Taiwan" and "The Independent Reader", come with audio, I think ICLP has recorded it, but as at ICLP are quite jealous of their material, not so easy to find. I would say, as Vivian Ling has written in the book "The Field of Chinese language Education in the U.S.", "Aspects of life in Taiwan" is the best companion to "Thought and Society", the former teaches the written (academic) language, the latter the spoken (academic language). However, at the moment, at ICLP "Aspects of life in Taiwan" is level 6, while "Thought and Society" is level 5. I can understand why, without an introduction to literary (or classical) Chinese, the material is quite difficult to master. There is a new edition of Aspects of life in Taiwan, published last year, but I don't know how the book has changed as unfortunately it is impossibile to buy if you don't study at ICLP. A great mistake: I understand they want to preserve the name of the program, but those materials would help to spread high-level Chinese language Education in the world, and help Taiwan to be a competitor (and a winner) with mainland China in that field. Great teachers should make the difference, not only the textbooks used, but this is just a personal opinion.
    2 points
  15. I have these in my kitchen (we're in lockdown btw): 金龙鱼非转基因黄金比例食用植物调和油 日清色拉油(非转基因大豆油) 李锦记精选生抽 李锦记锦珍老抽(上色用) 李锦记财神蚝油 李锦记蒸鱼豉油(蒸鱼专用、微甜) 海天味极鲜(凉拌用) 老恒和浙江黄酒(王致和料酒 when unavailable) 会稽山纯正绍兴酒(can drink directly)、台湾红标料理米酒(distilled liquor, not the rice wine as we know it, for a specific recipe) 红星蓝瓶二锅头(mostly as a nightcap, but occasionally useful when preparing 带鱼) 恒顺镇江香醋 古币芝麻香油(rarely used) 土豆/玉米淀粉 无碘海盐/湖盐 红梅味精(horrified? bite me) 太太乐鸡精 绵白糖 单晶冰糖 花椒 大料(aka 八角) 桂皮 香叶 干辣椒 白胡椒粉 王守义十三香(better than 五香粉) 王守义炖肉料、炖鸡料 咖喱粉、日式咖喱块(for 咖喱饭 obviously) 郫县豆瓣(川菜用) 六必居干黄酱、甜面酱(老北京炸酱面用) 阳江豆豉(only used once when I tried unsuccessfully to make 豉汁排骨) 虾皮 紫菜 干香菇 干木耳 干黄花菜 龙口粉丝等其他干货
    2 points
  16. 发展中国家 - developing country A simple word, but my mind automatically extracted 中国 as China which made me take a while to figure out the meaning. Edit: A search for "发展中国家" on Chinese-forums makes it clear that I'm not the first one to be befuddled by this word
    2 points
  17. Points have been made, I would appreciate it if we can leave it at that. If you really MUST continue, make a new topic so everyone else can ignore it, and please DON'T end up having the same discussion in two or more topics. Thanks.
    2 points
  18. Details of HSK 7-9 exam content (based on trial test 15 May 2022): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uRq3mDOSFxE Don't worry, the explanation in the video is in Chinese. 👍 😃
    2 points
  19. Ditto my advice in this thread November 12, 2020: "Sincere advice: Don't waste your life sitting around twiddling your thumbs in the vain expectation China will re-open to you. Just assume it's over and make your plans based on what you can do, not what you can't." Advice which still stands today.
    2 points
  20. I asked on Reddit to see if anybody there took the trial HSK 7-9 exam on Sunday, and one person replied. There was not a section that tested your handwriting ability, contrary to what the standards suggested. No 病句 questions were on the exam. There was a section that required you to arrange the paragraphs of an article into the correct order.
    2 points
  21. A good book series indeed! You might be interested to know Prof. Zong-qi Cai has organised a free podcast on How to Read Chinese poetry based on the poetry set. It's in English and the poems are recited in English and Mandarin. It started in February and is now on episode 16 (War as a Theme in Early Popular Chinese Poetry). there is a dedicated website with the details and downloadable pdfs here : How to Read Chinese Poetry and there's even a Chinese Poetry Podcast Facebook group The podcasts can be found on Spotify, Ximalaya, Apple, Google and don't know how many more platforms. I'm already behind with the schedule but the podcasts I listened to were very helpful to internalize what I had read in the book.
    2 points
  22. Definitely feels very top-down. Here's an absurd sentence from the first text in the HSK6 book I looked at. It includes the nouns for jacket, qipao, stereo, radio, faucet, buttons, socket, and device for prospecting for minerals! I initially thought I should partly-memorise these texts but now I've looked at them I really can't see the point.
    2 points
  23. What I don’t like about HSK books is that the texts just feel too artificial. Like they don’t care at all what it is about or what they write as long as they include all the words that need to be thought in each chapter. I find A Course in Contemporary Chinese texts to be more natural in introducing new grammar patterns and words, the topics are quite interesting like the popularity of plastic surgery, death penalty, surrogacy etc just feels more like real topics for adults no matter whether you are learning a language or not you’d probably still come across these topics in conversation.
    2 points
  24. I moved a few weeks ago. I thought to myself, there's no advantage to being near the city center when I can't go out anyway. So I moved to Tongzhou where the rent is substantially cheaper. My ex-housemates are now locked in their house---one of them was in some random room at the same time as some random person who was positive. They're slowly going mad, judging from their WeChat posts. That would have been me, had I not moved. I feel like I dodged a bullet. (Moving house as everything was locking down wasn't easy.) Here, we're basically getting tested daily. All the restaurants are take-away only; deliveries go to the 小区's gate; and we can order take-away. Still, there's no cases in our 小区, and a lot of people here often don't wear facemasks when outdoors. I often go next door to a farmer's market to buy fruit and vegetables. Do I like this zero-covid approach? I'm not sure. We had a pretty successful 2021 here, so I'm probably more positive about it than others. But I thought the plan was to "suck it up" until everyone was vaccinated then reopen (that made sense to me), but we've already got a very high vaccination rate here. I'm not sure what the endgame is here. However, maybe zero-covid is better than waiting a few weeks, then locking down for longer, and letting it harm people.
    1 point
  25. The name of this song is 思念, I post the lyrics below for reference. 你从哪里来,我的朋友好像一只蝴蝶飞进我的窗口, 不知能作几日停留, 我们已经分别的太久太久。 你从哪里来,我的朋友, 你好像一只蝴蝶飞进我的窗口, 为何你一去,别无消息, 只把思念积压在我的心头, 你从哪里来,我的朋友, 好像一只蝴蝶飞进我的窗口。 不知能作几日停留, 我们已经分别的太久太久, 你从哪里来,我的朋友, 你好像一只蝴蝶飞进我的窗口, 难道你又要,匆匆离去, 又把聚会当成一次分手。
    1 point
  26. For whatever reason, someone has scribbled something rude on the bottom of that box.
    1 point
  27. I am not sure I fully understand your post. Are you upset/disillusioned with your company, with China or both?[later on you mention opportunities "not involving China", but still hoping you can go to Shanghai... (?) Are you implying going there as a tourist? It seems COVID and ensuing policies has really shattered many ideas we had about China. Yesterday I spoke to a Chinese friend, who works here in Germany. He said he was ashamed of his nation for the current situation in "Shanghai". COVID and Chinese policies challenged many learners' motivation about Chinese. It also meant cancelled gap years or business trips to China. I am in the same boat. I used to visit China 3 times per year to conduct seminars, enjoy good food and explore new cities. I personally travelled to Taiwan for culture, food and language. Personally, my motivation has not faded away even though I am realistic enough to know I may not set foot into China before 2024. I guess it is a bit like investing in the stock market. Currently, my stocks have taken a major hit, but I am in it for the long run. So, I am still holding them optimistically hoping things will improve. Similarly, with China I am in it for the long run. I still think China is a major part of the future. Also, whenever I hear Chinese tourists abroard and I am able to understand some of their conversation, I feel an inner joy.
    1 point
  28. @Jan Finster I saw that video and I want to be careful with what I say but I personally find it incredibly hard to believe.
    1 point
  29. @Jan Finster Guifan dictionary says: chǎng 量 a 用於文娛體育活動 一場電影 | 一場比賽。 b 用於戲劇中較小的段落 第一幕第二場。 cháng 量 用於一件事情的過程, 相當於“陣” 一場大雨 | 白高興了一場 | 痛哭了一場 Based on the above, it should be 3rd tone
    1 point
  30. That is not fully the case yet. However its looking good and I personally think we should be able to have students study in Taipei again within the next few months. But then, I have been wrong quite a few times with my predictions in the last two years....
    1 point
  31. Generate srt, just open file with VLC or Movist pro. Any mistake, easy to open srt by txt editor. 473600652_hsk3.mp4 hsk 3.srt
    1 point
  32. Does anybody has the audio for the textbook "Talks on Chinese Culture"? I've bought the edition printed by Yale University, but the audio would help me a lot. Thank you for your help. 🙂
    1 point
  33. I owe you another one. Don't know how I'll be able to pay you back. Thank you. TBZ
    1 point
  34. Can anyone share their experience from studying simplified chinese before then studying traditional chinese for a term in MTC? How did you cope? I studied in Mainland before and is studying in Taiwan this term. although some characters are the same for both versions, I don't really know zhuyin that much. I am trying to study it along with pinyin. Any advice?
    1 point
  35. It's a decent standalone resource: lots of poems, no in-depth context but still some brief comments on each.
    1 point
  36. Just to give an update: still stuck in my apartment (6 weeks+ now I think? Losing track of time...). The good news is that the food situation is better, getting food is no longer difficult. Buying random stuff (100%+ markup of course) is relatively easy with group-buys, but getting specific stuff you actually want is still hard. Mentally the whole situation is really taking a toll on me (and everyone...), it just feels so freaking hopeless. 6 weeks in and my xiaoqu is still seeing cases everyday. How many and and why we dont know, because our juweihui sucks and dont tell us anything. Have some friends that got allowed to occasionally leave their compound due to no cases the last month that suddenly got 2 new cases yesterday and are now locked again. It really feels like the 0 case goal is impossible. At this point seeing Beijing getting more cases actually makes me happy, I'm already way past caring about other people. Let the guys up there that are deciding these policies suffer as well, lock down all those guys that think this is a "Shanghai is shitty"-problem only. I know this aint a very nice or healthy attitude, but am in a revolutionary mood lately. Exhausted
    1 point
  37. Iv'e been stuck inside in my apartment in Shanghai the last 4 weeks now, starting to go a bit "crazy" at this point. Although the whole city has been locked down for 1+ week now there doesn't seem to be signs of improvement. Quite the opposite, the numbers are getting worse everyday for some reason. Currently buying anything is really difficult, take away have all stopped, placing personal orders anywhere is next to impossible. People are now mostly reduced to 团购ing, where 20+ people from the same 小区 place a large order together directly with a supplier, but we've been informed today that even that is getting shut down now. Apparently this 团购ing, is suspected to be the main way Corona is spreading now as picking up and distributing these supplies are basically the only interaction between people now. Been doing daily rapid self-tests these last few days, but our 小区 is somehow still finding new cases after 4 weeks of being locked down, believe it or not. The atmosphere in the city seems to be reaching a boiling point, lots of complaints with regards to how the government has (not) handled this: * Super slow reaction to the spread of cases, they were still trying to isolate 小区 by 小区 when it was obvious that it was all over SH. This strategy might have worked with Delta, but with the latest Omnicron variants there is no way you can stop it like this... * Lack of supplies, people unable to buy what they need and the government is not providing much/anything * Shitty conditions at the huge temporary quarantine centers for the "asymptomatic cases" (which is 98% of the cases according to the official numbers) * No clear plan, lack of communication regarding the future. Before the city-wide lockdown, some 小区 (e.g. ours) were closed 48 hours for testing, but never got opened again afterwards. Again, no communication as to why or when it would open. * Horror cases like a dog getting beaten to death due to the owner being taken to quarantine. * A lot of people in SH's salary depends on actually working, if you dont work you dont get paid/get just your "base" salary. Currently nobody knows anything, but it doesnt look promising. At this point I dont think anything I will be able to go outside in April. Just praying that at least for the 1st of May vacation I will be allowed outside again. To end on some more positive notes: at least my personal situation aint that bad. Still got enough food for some time, my apartment is big enough that I at least have a living room, a bed room and an office, and I have my wife with me. Hopefully we'll start to see the numbers going down soon!
    1 point
  38. I am proud that I have kept up with Chinese so persistently. Just a few more years and I'll be able to say I've been studying for a decade, haha. I want to take it all the way.
    1 point
  39. This thread reads as if China is self-isolating from the world forever. As long as they are running a zero-COVID game, they will obviously not let foreign students in. Other countries do the same. But, long-term, China would be very wise to let business people, tourists and students back in. And, I do not see why they would not do so. Realistically, I can imagine going back to China for holidays or holding seminars in 2023. Obviously my friends in China will assume I must be fluent by then ("you had so much time during the pandemic..."). Well, sadly, there is a major anti-climax waiting for them...
    1 point
  40. Some Taiwanese podcasts specifically for Chinese learners (roughly ordered by difficulty): Inspire Mandarin https://inspiremandarin.com transcripts: no very beginner friendly Learn Taiwanese Mandarin https://lear-taiwanese-mandarin.webnode.tw/ transcripts: yes beginner friendly The Taiwanese Way https://www.thetaiwaneseway.com/ transcripts: yes Talk Taiwanese Mandarin with Abby https://talktaiwanesemandarin.com/ transcripts: yes Mandarin with Miss Lin https://www.patreon.com/MandarinWithMissLin transcripts: yes (paid, via patreon) 還可中文 Haike Mandarin https://haikemandarintw.blogspot.com/ transcripts: yes
    1 point
  41. When I realized I wasn't going to live in China anymore, I felt a bit of an existential crisis regarding my Chinese as well. What's the point of studying a language of a place you don't plan to live in? I don't know. What's the point of learning anything that isn't immediately practical? I study Chinese because I enjoy it. After over a decade I'm still very curious about the place, its history and culture. Learning about other people and their language and culture is humanizing even if you don't need it to get through your daily life. Many Asians have been fascinated with western language and culture despite living most of their lives in Asia. Studying a foreign language when you might not get to live in the place is not "sad", it's very special to be able to have a hobby that compliment's man's natural feelings of curiosity about the world beyond your doorstep. Why buy a telescope if you'll never be an astronaut, etc.... At least, I really hope to travel extensively there again one day.
    1 point
  42. 失温 hypothermia - kept coming up in reports about the deaths on that cross-country marathon.
    1 point
  43. OK, here's another one related to yesterday's purchase: 小电驴 xiǎo diàn lǘ (lit. little electric donkey) — nickname for e-bikes.
    1 point
  44. Actually 头盔 is the term that the salesman used. He gave me a (really crap) free one, but I will be browsing helmets online for the next day or two for sure.
    1 point
  45. 房奴 fángnú - (being a) slave to one's mortgage
    1 point
  46. It's just a more verbose way of saying the same thing — 电脑 and 编制 can both be omitted without introducing any ambiguity. It looks kind of textbook-ese, usually people don't communicate in such a verbose way. 程序员 or 工程师 are both a lot more common (工程师 is more generally "engineer" but often understood as "software engineer" within the IT domain).
    1 point
  47. Is "pun of the day" okay? Regarding the whole Xinjiang cotton thing and the stock rise of Li-Ning, I came across this pun today. Kinda embarrassed about how long it took me to get it
    1 point
  48. Wow, how long ago was this that you could get all this done so easily? AFAIK it's not possible to apply for a new work visa (Z-visa) inside China. Also, there's no such things as a Foreign Expert Certificate any more. This is the process I went through in 2020, from the UK. Actually I did it all twice because my visa was initially awarded in March just before full lock-down, and it expired in June before I had a chance to enter China, so I had to start all over again. Disclaimer: this being China, all of this is subject to change at any time, and possibly varies depending on which province or municipality you're going to. VISA APPLICATION Get a job in China and sign the contract. Apply for police background check in home country to show no criminal record Get original police check certificate and a copy of highest degree certificate notarised by a solicitor or notary public Send the notarised documents to the government authority (Foreign and Commonwealth Office in UK) for addition of an apostille. "Legalisation" of the documents with apostilles at the Chinese Consulate or Embassy (now handled by the visa application centre in the UK). Get standard medical check done (chest X-ray, ECG, blood test including HIV, Syphilis, etc.) Receive copy of medical check results Submit scans of all the above documents to employer in China so they can apply for Work Permit and "PU Letter" 邀请函 Receive PU Letter. Receive notification of Foreigner's Work Permit being granted 中华人民共和国 外国人工作许可通知 Submit visa application to Chinese embassy/consulate/visa application centre consisting of: Completed application form Current passport Copy of passport ID page Signed copy of declaration form Copy of previous visa (if any) PU letter Notification of Foreigner's Work Permit Collect passport from Visa Application Centre with Z-visa in it Now for the COVID-related bit, which has has varied a great deal since I arrived in China in October, depending on country of origin and local COVID situation: Get COVID PCR test done and receive certificate showing negative result (a week after my test this was extended to also include an antibody test and they both had to be done within 48 hours of flying; not sure of the current situation, see the IATA website and click on China for details.) Submit health declaration form to Chinese consulate/embassy for authentication Receive authenticated health declaration which had to be shown when boarding the plane. THEN... Travel to China and quarantine in government-allocated quarantine hotel for 14 days. (Recently extended to 14 days in hotel then 7 days in "home quarantine" and then 7 days self-reporting.) Another PCR test 3 days before leaving quarantine (some of my colleagues also had an antibody test). Being negative is required to leave quarantine of course. When leaving quarantine, receive green "Health code" (QR code) on phone app — mine lives inside AliPay — which enables free movement around local area and possibly beyond, depending on what's happening in China. THEN... Once in country, employer applies for Work Permit Card Get Chinese medical check done (in my case I showed them everything from the UK check and they just gave me another chest X-ray) Receive standard Chinese medical check certificate — valid for 6 months Apply for residence permit at Public Security Bureau (Z-visa is converted to residence permit in passport)... requires Work Permit Card, passport and medical certificate At long last, get passport back with residence permit in it. My own timeline was: 13 Jul — Started the ball rolling with police background check and then notarising documents 10 Aug — submitted all docs to employer in China 08 Oct — appointment to submit visa application in person 15 Oct — received passport with Z-visa 25 Oct — flew to China 09 Nov — left Quarantine 23 Dec — collected passport with residence permit from PSB Hope this helps — welcome to the forums!
    1 point
  49. In the future, there will be no 'outside' China…
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...