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Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/09/2019 in all areas

  1. 13 points
    Just a small reflection I wanted to share here on my improvements with tv comprehension. I can vividly remember feeling so frustratated with how impossible and stressful watching the 'fun' Chinese tv recommended here on the forums used to be. But now watching tv is so easy and fun, I wanted to share my 'yeah you can do it' moment So, I watched 琅琊榜 when it came out, which was what about 3-4 years ago now. I loved it, but it was such hard work, I remember spending about a week working through the first episode alone. The visual aids made it watcheable and fun, but I was well aware of the fact that I was only really able to grasp the bare bones of the plot, and struggled a lot with even trying to pick out names from regular vocabulary. After that, I watched similar kinds of tv shows non stop, for years, with depressingly low success rates. But it did seem to be getting easier. Just that progress was painfully slow. But I figured, what else was I going to do with my evenings? So I kept watching, and pausing, and then watching...and then pausing...etc Flash forward to earlier this year, I finished the fantastic 武林外传 (highly recommended), but after having such an annoying time with what you might call 方言-interference in my everyday Chinese tones (from the non-standard accents in the show), I then switched to something more 'clear' - the classic 甄嬛传 (avoided for years because sadly I thought it was too 'girly' - imo this show is actually a legit classic and must watch for intermediate-advanced Chinese learners). It was still pretty tough going, but by the end I would say I felt 'relaxed' and enjoyed it without any language stress - ie. minimal pausing, I would guess maybe around 98^% listening comprehension. Recently I took a break to read 左傳 in the evening instead of TV. This evening I sat down feeling pretty tired (dissertation translation submitted...finally!) and thought, hey, why not give 琅琊榜 a try again, would be good to rewatch it. I was shocked to find I could understand everything, the plot, the subplot, insinuations, jokes, you name it. Must have been 99.5^% comprehension or something. I just sat and watched five episodes straight without a hitch. In fact the language is actually easier than 甄嬛传, and obviously way way way easier than 左傳. I almost cried it felt so good. So thats all I really wanted to say really, in a really long-winded way... Hopefully some will read this and remember what the struggle was like, others might realise, it will come, don't give up.
  2. 5 points
    this is important actually, I remember at the start of my studies all my fellow students had the same complaint "I can't relate the comprehension book (NPCR) to the spoken book" It did seem like two different languages. It takes a heck of a long time for the fog to clear. I too like to see a few different text books at the same level as if you rely on one, that particular author's writing style is too prevalent and you end up believing that there is only one way to write Chinese. As regards the topic of text books in general, I still believe that they should be the mainstay up to HSK5. HSK6 only if you want a HSK route as the grammar is easily picked up by context (and a good dictionary) Now it's important to note I mentioned mainstay, My biggest mistake in regards reading Chinese was not getting away from the textbooks early enough, i.e. the first month. I don't mean put them aside, I mean supplement them with native material. that can be simply wechat, street signs, text messages, Chinese apps.. That way you see in what context a word is used (e.g. the way they would use 将 instead of 把, 便 instead of 就, 用 instead of 吃,喝) So you don't really need to understand the whole passage, however it gives you an awareness of these little adverbs, conj etc that you can easily pass by in text books not realising they are used in every day life. E.g in a coffee shop they might say 在这儿用吗 Also it helps with the almost unavoidable habit of translating your native language directing to Chinese. For example, in Chinese excuse me is 劳驾. Used a heck of a lot in UK but to this day I never once heard anyone use that in China. E.g on a subway escalator you might say 过一下, to pass someone who is standing on the left Further text books by nature need to divide the chapter into separate topics so its hard to know whats a frequent use of a word, grammar point and what isn't. The good ones will try to bring previously learned words into the later chapters but when you pass several thousand it is just not possible without the passage becoming unwieldy . Also as you get to HSK5 or so a lot of the passages might seem a tad awkward as they are trying to force those less use words into a text for sake of exposure. Every time I show a passage to a native speaker they say "well there is nothing wrong with it, just sounds odd to use words in that context” Its always noticeable that a lot of foreigners use the same words as they picked them up early on text books or haven't reached enough exposure to see the difference, thus stick with what they learnt. E.g 散步 for strolling around , whereas they might probably want to say 溜达溜达 , 走一走,转转 etc Textbooks are however a very concise way to covering all the bases. I, every few months will read an entire text book that's well below my level in a weekend. Although they are dull and although I know the story inside out it's a great way to "see the wood from the trees" so to speak So, in my view textbooks are the ingredients of the cake but native material is the binder that keeps it all together.
  3. 3 points
    When I was in high school, I was that guy who was getting easy A's all the time. There was a big exception: Spanish. Spanish was bad. A big problem, of course, was the pedagogy: Memorize nearly meaningless lists and charts to pass tests. That was it. I passed, but I found that while I was in Spanish, my other grades suffered. It seemed like dealing with foreign language learning lowered my overall IQ. I thought Chinese would be different. After all, I lived in the country, and I would be learning real-world communication. When I started, it felt like I could either deal with learning Chinese, or I could deal with everything else in life. So, I did what any sensible person would do: I quit everything else in life to learn Chinese. In school, everything was like a big heavy fog. Nothing made any sense. Gradually, it did get a little better. I figured that the longer I stuck with it, the better it would get. I passed the HSK 6 before graduation, so obviously I succeeded, right? I've now been living in the U.S. for a number of years, and I'm working for a Chinese company - and the fog hasn't lifted. Compared to previous jobs I've had in an all-English environment, I'm a total idiot here. Half my colleagues are Chinese and speak little to no English, and the other half are Americans who speak no Chinese at all. I have a very hard time remembering anything anyone says to me - in either language. It's like I'm in a constant state of dazed distraction, so nothing can actually get into my brain. After being at it for a few years now, it's not getting any better. No doubt, as I get older, my memory gets worse. However, when I get back into a 100% English environment, I do pretty well again. So age clearly isn't the main issue. Has anybody else had a similar experience?
  4. 3 points
    If there were exact equivalents in English, then Chinese would be easy to pronounce. The reason why xi is difficult to grasp is because there isn't an equivalent in English. Having said that, one thing that helped me early on is the realisation that in Taiwan, x is often transcribed as hs, which I feel makes much more sense to an English speaker.
  5. 2 points
    Yes! I would look very carefully at what @889 has highlighted here... your personal happiness in either city is far more likely to be dominated by things like: What is your workload at the school? Are you earning what you are worth? How much support do you get? Are you thrown in at the deep-end and expected to develop lots of new material, or do they give it to you all in advance? Has the school had any issues with visas, law enforcement etc? Is it well-established and trustworthy? How will you grow and develop as a professional while you are there? What would be your next job? No matter how lovely the city, or how wonderful an apartment you find, if you are living through hell at work then none of this will compensate. Also Kunming and Shenzhen are about as far apart in China as it's possible to get... it's worth considering how easily you can travel to places you want to go, including home for family/friends and for holidays. Kunming is ideal for travelling west and exploring SE Asia; Shenzhen would be much better if you want to East or have people in Japan, Korea, Bali or Australia for example. As for the 7000 RMB difference, if you don't drink and always cook for yourself, then I would imagine you'd save a lot more money. Again, it depends on whether SZ suits your lifestyle, and if it doesn't are you happy to save the extra money anyway? Everyone has different criteria!
  6. 2 points
    Both are good places to be, though in different ways. I'd look very carefully at the reputation of the school and the specifics of the job and housing, location in relation to the rest of the city, shopping and transport especially.
  7. 2 points
    From your opening post Kunming seems like the clear choice to me. I think it will take longer to adjust to Kunming than shenzhen if you are coming from a typical western city (however one defines that) . If you are coming to China for work only then I'd say shenzhen is the best choice I never liked shenzhen , it has all the conveniences no doubt but just seems no character to it . If you are coming to China for a period in your life you would want that to be memorable hence best to select a more traditional city, My 2 cents/mao anyway
  8. 2 points
    Spent a half an hour making up tongue twisters and saying things i find challenging. 我们出去白云区吃鱼. 紫砂 自杀 Too fun!
  9. 2 points
    I have been getting listening practice from all sorts of different sources - I watch cctv news daily, speak to friends and family in Chinese, and have had to read an inordinate amount of official speeches in Chinese in the last year as part of my interpreting and translating course. I'm sure all these things do contribute, but the tv shows I like watching use language very different to these colloquial or official flavours of Mandarin/dialect. I think the thing that has helped the most in getting comprehension up for tv was reading, reading 武侠小说 helped a lot for shows like 鹿鼎记、射雕英雄传 etc. and I definitely noticed how useful 古文观止 has been for 宫鬥.
  10. 2 points
    I have mentioned this before. My grandfather was Professor of Languages and head of the language dept of Bonn university between the wars. He could speak, read and write 7 languages, he could also read and write another 7. He always made this distinction but never made it sound like it lessened his abilities. He translated Shakespeare in to Arabic. He complied and translated North African Idioms in to English and French and too much more to go into here. He also taught many, many students several languages. I do think you can be fluent but not speak the language, but if you can speak and understand but not read or write you are still fluent, just means you are illiterate. There are many people around the world who can speak their mother tongue "fluently" but can not read or write. For me to be fluent means you can speak to people in another language on topics and subjects that you can in your own language. A distinction must be drawn between vocabulary and grammar, syntax etc. I am fluent in English but I lack the vocabulary to conduct a conversation on quantum mechanics or meteorology although I am aware of these things. Origin from the dictionary - late 16th century: from Latin fluent- ‘flowing’, from the verb fluere So flowing, easy, articulate. You can even describe some one's runny nose as fluent. From the dictionary again - able to flow freely; fluid. "a fluent discharge from the nose To me this describes it perfectly - flowing speech. No more needs to be said in my opinion.
  11. 2 points
    Based on your first post, it seems you're in a working environment where you're constantly switching between English and Chinese. That switching alone can be tiring and may be responsible for some of the fog. You might well do much better in an all-Chinese environment.
  12. 2 points
    Looking for "close" English sounds will not help. Best to work with your teacher on pairs that show the difference, like 喜事 and 实习. Tongue placement and air flow are the keys.
  13. 2 points
    Maybe this is wrong, but I've stopped with decks totally. Instead I just spend an hour or so per day reading. I highlight words I don't know. If I don't know a word, I look it up, I practice writing it in a few sentences. Sometimes I go back to stuff I've read and generally I've forgotten some things that I had learned before. Then, I do the same thing, write a few more sentence and move on. The thing is, if you spend 20-30 minutes per day on your SRS, you are spending that time learning words out of context. Even if you review 100 words in that 30 minute span, you are still not reviewing them in an authentic setting. By choosing instead to simply engage with written materials at your level, you are reinforcing your reading comprehension in general, instead of just hyper-focusing on some problem words that may or may not be all that useful. Spending 30 minutes reading something at your level and your eyes would cross hundreds if not thousands of characters in that time, reinforcing your understanding of them, and you would still come away with a vocabulary list of things that were not quite clear to you. As with most things, the thing you practice doing is the exact thing that you will get better at. Practicing reading isolated words on SRS help you get better at doing exactly that. Practicing reading gets you better at an actual application of the language. Granted at a lower stage you really do just need to roll up your sleeves and start memorizing since there aren't really any written materials outside your text book that you can engage with until you know a few hundred characters. Full disclosure: I spent tens if not hundreds of hours cramming hundreds of handmade flashcards my first year of Chinese class. I didn't start to make real headway until I realized that the actual dialogues and example sentences in my Chinese Textbook were by far the best resources at my disposal, and I had for more to gain just by reading my textbook inside and out.
  14. 1 point
    I started this topic because I am a great believer in textbooks for the beginner and intermediate and to some degree higher levels. @Larry Language Lover I would highly recommend the text book New Practical Chinese Reader. This is a complete course with textbook, workbook and audio and video (on YouTube). One reason I like textbooks is because they are well paced and present you with the information in a sensible order. In my opinion the NPCR does this very well. You will learn Pinyin, then Characters, and speaking, listening, reading and writing. It is good for self study as it is very popular and there are lots of ready made apps etc with word/character lists. ie: Tofu learn for writing characters, Pleco for flashcards and also an excellent dictionary platform. There are many more. Have a look on my blog (see link below) Two articles are about NPCR and how I use it. There are also reviews on several useful apps. I can't emphasis enough how important I think it is to follow a text book for a couple of years at least to form a solid base to work from and as @DavyJonesLocker says - So, in my view textbooks are the ingredients of the cake but native material is the binder that keeps it all together. So a very important part but not the only part, and as you learn, the ratio of textbooks to native material will change.
  15. 1 point
    These are easier and easier to reach as Kunming has become a SE Asia airline hub. Short non-stop flights are more and more available at very decent prices. Last week I flew to Taiwan. In November I'll visit Luang Prabang. (Nonstop on China Eastern, flying time under 2 hours, cost under $200 USD.) Vientiane is also under 2 hours. Earlier this summer I flew nonstop to Chiang Mai, last winter to Bangkok. In the spring I flew to Hanoi, last winter to Saigon. I go to Kuala Lumpur about once a year, and from there sometimes move on to nearby places (sometimes Penang, sometimes Ipoh, sometimes south to Malacca.) Have explored Indonesia a bit; particularly like Bali. Hong Kong takes only a couple hours by plane, as does Macau. The new airport 长水国际机场 is the 5th busiest in China. We now have a new train station (South station 昆明南站) that serves as a high-speed rail link. Convenient trips down to Guangzhou and even up to Shanghai (if one likes long train rides.)
  16. 1 point
    Speak up or forever not get what you want.
  17. 1 point
    kunming. friendlier, less english around, no cantonese, even better air than sz, better geography nearby. Just would be my personal choice. I like shenzhen ok, i like kunming more.
  18. 1 point
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but do X visas state a length of stay per visit? I though it was one of those where you were expected to convert to a residence permit after entry into China.
  19. 1 point
    My work colleague was riding into the office today and passed over a railway bridge where he saw a train of flat-bed trucks carrying TANKS! Thankfully we know why, but still... quite an alarming sight I would imagine. Edit: I'm in Beijing, not Shenzhen
  20. 1 point
    You can use it for that too! I don't like the listening-in Wechat is no doubt doing, but this feature is still fantastic.
  21. 1 point
  22. 1 point
    No, it's a speech-to-text converter. I just tried it and it worked for me, when I paid proper attention to my tones... On my version of the APP (7.0.5) the little [...] menu gives a drop-down that lets you choose English, Mandarin or Cantonese as the recognised language. Pretty cool.
  23. 1 point
    I, like the rest of you, use a VPN to connect to sites outside of China. However, every time I wanted to connect to Chinese sites like Weibo or Taobao, I'd get intercepted with a "suspicious login" screen and either have to jump through hoops or get denied altogether. I could just disconnect the VPN, but sometimes it doesn't like to reconnect and takes time to find another server that is connectable, and once I get a good session going I'm disinclined to stop a good thing. Well, ever since I started connecting through Taiwan, all those problems disappeared. Because Taiwan is part of China, right? 😎 No more interception screens. Just smooth sailing and an occasional "Taiwan compatriot, would you like traditional characters instead?" option.
  24. 1 point
    Wanted to share this with you guys because it's a topic that I frequently hear discussed and at times can be the source of some strong opinions. We thought we would devote a podcast episode about the topic and talk about how the division of simplified vs traditional characters came about and even how they approached simplification. It was a really fun episode to record and I thought it would be a good topic for discussion here since there is much more to it than can be covered in one podcast. There are a lot of other people here with a lot of insights and information into the whole topic! Here is a link to the podcast episode: The Controversy Between Simplified and Traditional Characters Explained | You Can Learn Chinese Podcast
  25. 1 point
    I'm not sure I believe that passive exposure is actually helpful except during a short time at the very beginning of the learning process. Perhaps it sort of gets one used to the "general sound" of the language so that one could distinguish between Mandarin Chinese and Swahili or Icelandic without actually understanding the content.
  26. 1 point
    This. And this. I don't think I've taken a regular taxi in about a year, I always get Didi now. The fact that they use GPS and you can even select the route you want to the driver to take is great. Being able to review the drivers after each ride really helps, as they having something to lose so to speak. There was one time a guy didn't want to take me, so while I waited in the rain, he drove close enough that he could say he had arrived, but was in fact down a different road. He wouldn't answer my calls or texts, then when it said "Your driver has been waiting for 3 minutes, so he can now cancel for free.", guess what, he cancelled. After contacting Didi support, who also spoke English when they found out I was a foreigner, send me some 30rmb vouchers. Most of the time though, the drivers are great. I usually buy one of those cards up front for like 3000, then they give you an extra 400 or 500.
  27. 1 point
    Du Gangjian is a law prof, with no formal education in history or linguistics, who has written an entire book that essentially posits China as the cradle of Indo-European civilization. He is a total moron. You can find the book online I think it’s called something like 文明源頭與大同世界
  28. 1 point
    I was told by someone who knew him, that the translator and scholar Arthur Waley couldn't really speak Chinese. Yet, he produced some of the most beautiful, moving and correct English translations of Chinese poetry (from pre-Qin, Han, Tang) that one is likely to find, even now. He also produced a superb abridged version of "Journey to the West". Whether one can call Waley fluent or not seems kind of irrelevant in light of his production.
  29. 1 point
    Started this week in the platform 中国大学MOOC (Chinese University MOOC) : 学汉字 知中国 (Learning Chinese characters and knowing China) from Sichuan University The teachings are in Chinese with Chinese and English subtitles (that can be turned off entirely). Videos playing speed can be modified and videos can be downloaded to mobile devices once the App is installed (IOS or Android, links on the platform's home page). I don't know about the next 8-9 weeks, but the first week's lecturer speaks perfect putonghua. Thare are handouts, and each week's topic ends with a good English summary. Registration is 100% free and certificates are emailed automatically at the end of the course on fulfillment of the set requirements. Payment is required for validated (formal) online or paper certificate, I believe these are only available for residents in China and require payment through a Chinese bank. Auditing is of course allowed. More information on '中国大学Moocs' in this thread.
  30. 1 point
    OK, so here's some more info about me: I have a 4-year bachelor's degree in Chinese from a university in China. I passed the HSK 6 twice, most recently last year. As far as speaking, I took the ACTFL OPI for fun last summer, and was rated "Advanced High," which, from what I can tell, is basically C1. My study routine lately has been a mixture of Advanced ChinesePod lessons from Shanghai (almost finished - they're getting a bit too easy), along with some Chairman's Bao, 刘慈欣 short story audiobooks, continuing to read a 1-million-character internet novel I started a few years ago, and watching some 人民的名义. All of these things (except 刘慈欣) seem like preschool compared to trying to function at my job. Had I started a decade earlier (I started at age 29), and/or if I had a Chinese environment (my life is 90% English), my thinking might be different. But as it is, I'm beginning to feel that my incompetence at work is borderline malpractice. (I did tell them up front: "I speak Chinese, but I'm NOT a translator.") I'm now over 40, and I'm seeing a noticeable decline in my ability to learn anything, not just Chinese. All of my previous jobs were pretty easy, but this time I think "I've met my match." After 3 years, I'm not able to learn the Chinese I need to know, nor am I able to learn the technical stuff I need to know. It's like the Chinese language and the technical stuff short-circuit each other out. I've seen no improvement in quite a while, and in fact, I think I see decline. I considered going back to grad school this fall for more Chinese, but various circumstances ended that. What's my actual question? I guess that's what I'm trying to figure out. The ultimate question I'm working toward is: "Is it time to just quit?" I do have other non-Chinese options.
  31. 1 point
    The first thing I'd do is look on AliExpress, the overseas version of Taobao. Shipping can be very reasonable, but your package often seems to get sent to Singapore first, where it's re-sent. It can take some time to reach you.
  32. 1 point
    Thanks for bringing this poem by Li Shangyin. Your interpretation makes sense but, as you say, there are many possible alternative views. Do you have any explanation for the 锦 (brocade?) in 锦瑟? I don't understand Li Shangyin's poems but I like the words and imagery he uses, so I enjoy reading them and searching for explanations. I very much agree with Liang Qizhao (梁啟超, 1873-1929) : For anyone interested in this poet, the quote above is from the Introduction in a 2018 book on Li Shangyin by Chloe Garcia-Roberts: Li Shang-yin (NYRB poets), which includes 3 different, and all equally beautiful English translations, of this particular poem. The poems in this book are in both Chinese and English.
  33. 1 point
    Larry, Time for a test! Let’s take the word for ‘teacher’ in Chinese, 老师. Do you think the second character has a vowel sound more like the English name ‘Pete’ or more like the English word ‘put’?
  34. 1 point
    You will never ever speak Chinese well if you insist on finding English cognates for Chinese sounds. It's a road to ruin. To repeat what I have said again and again here, THE overwhelming problem learning Chinese is speaking so that native speakers can understand you. You can study for years and still draw blank faces when you say the simplest things.Take Chinese sounds as Chinese sounds, period. Otherwise, your next steps down that road to ruin will find you thinking that 是 means is.
  35. 1 point
    I think (at least part of) the problem is the lack of context, or to put it another way, not having complete situational awareness. Things are much easier to memorise when they are fully understood in context, and lack of full awareness of the context makes them that much more difficult to understand and internalise. Context is like a scaffolding of pieces of information that combine to form a coherent picture. If you have enough situational awareness, it is easy to make sense of any new information and slot it into the relevant part of the scaffolding. On the other hand, if you don't have the situational awareness, it is difficult to understand the relevance of new information, you don't know where to put it so you just discard it, and the scaffolding itself is at risk of complete collapse because of all the missing links. I think this principle is true for any situation, even when working exclusively in your mother tongue. A foreign language just adds an additional veil over the situation making it that much harder to penetrate. From what you describe, it sounds like your comprehension is below the critical level needed to hold the scaffolding together. The scaffolding has crashed down, and you are in a constant daze because you're not quite sure how anything anyone says to you relates to the bigger picture.
  36. 1 point
  37. 1 point
    The tool is called VocabSplitter. It provides the following features for Chinese Learners : Segment Chinese texts into words. (97% accuracy) Integrate MDBG dictionary seamlessly. Also provides NCIKU(LINE Dictionary) as a reference. Integrate the SRS (Space Repetition System) to help the learners memorize the words more efficiently. Share learning material with each other. To use the tool, the learner can import a piece of text into it (along with Audios and Videos), then the tool can segment the texts into words (with 97% accuracy). And then it can highlight the words with different colors to remind the learners if they have seen the word before. It looks like the following: Click the “Import” button on the “Library” page to import your text: Copy and paste your texts into the dialog, and provide the source of the video or audio file: The tool will segment the texts into words and highlight them with colors to remind the learners whether they have seen the word before: The red underline of a word means that the learner has never seen the word before; the blue underline means that the learner has met the word but hasn't "mastered" that word yet; no underline means the learner has already "mastered" that word. Because it has integrated a Chinese-English dictionary, so the learner can select any texts on the page to get the definition of selected text (including sentences), and then they can add the words to their vocabulary: After the learner adds several words into his/her vocabulary, this tool can schedule a review date for each word in the vocabulary based on a learning technique called Spaced Repetition System. The learner can go to the Vocabulary page to select the words which are due for reviewing, and then the tool can generate an exam for the learner. The exams will test the learner's knowledge of pinyin, definition, and the usage of the word. The following is an example: Go to the “Vocabulary” page, and then select the words which are due for reviewing: The tool will generate an exam to test the learner's knowledge of a word: If the question is too hard for the learner, he/she can click "Show more hints" button to let the tool provide more hints: And best of all, the tool is free. It can be found at: https://www.vocabsplitter.com It's recommended to use a PC to access this tool, because the iOS and Android apps are still under development at this moment.
  38. 1 point
    Hello and welcome! Could you summarise your question into once sentence? i.e. Are you more interested in learning, cultural issues, the influence of other L2s (like Spanish), etc...?
  39. 1 point
    Hi everyone, the other day I found the thread with the word-frequency Pleco user dictionary (https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/56816-sharing-a-pleco-word-frequency-user-dictionary/) and started using it. As a complementary dictionary I made a character-frequency dictionary with entries for single characters, denoting the position in a character frequency ranking (contrary to the frequency among all words like in the word-frequency dictionary). The sources I used were subtlex (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2880003/) and the list by Jun Da (http://lingua.mtsu.edu/chinese-computing/statistics/char/list.php?Which=MO). The entries show up both in the list of search results when you search for a single characters and in the DICT tab of a single character entry. To add the character-frequency dictionary to your Pleco download the cfreq.pgb, open Pleco - Settings - Manage Dictionaries - Add, select EXISTING and select the cfreq.pgb file on your phone. cheers, Jannes cfreq.pqb
  40. 1 point
    Chinese poem illustration: 锦瑟 The Magnificent Se by Li Shangyin https://youtu.be/jXB-GJ-8Bfk This poem is just like pearl and jade among the richness and glory of Tang poetry. It might not be the most popular poem, while it is regarded as the best Tang poem by poetry lovers, by poets through the 1200+ years Chinese history afterwards. The perfect wording, the colorful images and illusions, the mysterious subject almost impossible to decipher make this masterpiece also the greatest puzzle in Chinese poetry history. This video is my personal approach to decipher this poem, adding one more possibility to so many existing explanations of this poem: wrapping up words of his whole life when is dying. PS: The 3rd pair of sentences also expressed that his feeling which is the tear drops of pearl is as deep as ocean, his spirit which is the smoke of jade would go beyond the huge mountains. 锦瑟 李商隐 锦瑟无端五十弦, 一弦一柱思华年。 庄生晓梦迷蝴蝶, 望帝春心托杜鹃。 沧海月明珠有泪, 蓝田日暖玉生烟。 此情可待成追忆, 只是当时已惘然。 I had a article on this poem in Chinese as well: 此情今再忆,锦瑟五十年
  41. 1 point
    We use 汉语高级写作教程 -
  42. 1 point
    ok looks like some of you were right and that it may very well be a fake news story. The same image comes up in 2015 for a financial crimes case In any case, sharing explicit material is a big no-no in China it seems . I thought it best to update the thread rather than mislead readers .
  43. 1 point
    China Development Brief has a directory of NGOS here: http://www.chinadevelopmentbrief.cn/directory/
  44. 1 point
    Greetings and welcome, Mr. Q. Before you get too set on implementing Standard Cantonese, I must inform you of something extremely relevant to your project in regards to your desired level of accuracy and authenticity. To the best of my knowledge, nearly every Chinese immigrant living and working in and around San Francisco (and North America in general) before the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 (and until that act was ultimately abolished during WWII) spoke Taishanese/Toisanese/Hoisanese/台山話, which is a topolect of the Yue (Cantonese) branch of the Han Chinese language family; it's as different as Peking and Nanking Mandarin, or, if that comparison is lost on you, English and Scots (not Scottish-accented English, mind you). Below are two good free online dictionaries for this topolect: https://www.stephen-li.com/TaishaneseVocabulary/Taishanese.html https://sites.fitnyc.edu/users/gene_chin/hed/index.htm The first resource uses a modified form of Broad IPA (not really appropriate to quote in a book as it's a technical script) with each syllable accompanied by an audio sample, whilst the second employs its own proprietary ad-hoc Romanisation. For the scope of a book primarily written in English, an anglocentric Romanisation of Taishanese would be more approachable, and since one of my favourite hobbies is designing such systems, I'd be happy to do so if you'd like. Mandarin: 你想要一些嗎? Cantonese: 你想唔想要啲咁多呀? Taishanese: 你想唔想攞啲多呀? Taishanese Broad IPA: [ ni˧ ɫjaŋ˥ m˨ ɫjaŋ˥ hɔ˥ nit˥ ʔu˨˩˥ ja˨ ] Taishanese Anglicised: "nee, thlyang! mm... thlyang! haw! neet! oo..? ya..." Taishanese Mandarinised: "ni lxiāng mˇ lxiāng hō nīt wǔ ya"
  45. 1 point
    This in-depth article from BBC - Future seems a fitting contribution here. It's also fascinating reading and raises some very interesting points. "How do we measure language fluency?" by Eva Sandoval
  46. 1 point
    Agree, their coffee is good. They are everywhere in Beijing but most places appear to have little or no seating so more suited for the “on the go crowd” or office staff popping out for a quick coffee The Starbucks reserve counter seems to be a a bit of disaster for them. Don't think I've even seen one customer use them in the places I go to. Mind you not sure what they were thinking charging up to 70kuai for a coffee!
  47. 1 point
    For all of last year they had half price food and cakes. You could order a muffin for 7rmb and a wrap for a similar price. It was great! Even now they have a lot of vouchers and offers where you can get big discounts. The drinks are identical to Starbucks in my opinion. I'm just not a fan of their stores. Every time I've been to one the staff have had terrible attitude.
  48. 1 point
    No wonder I got this reply on my examination report from Zhejiang "HSK和HSK成绩未达我校一学年研修入学标准,不予录取" I have an HsK 3 score of 278. Zhejiang A&F did accept me though.
  49. 1 point
    I created a user dictionary for Pleco which adds a new "dictionary" to Pleco so that when you look up a word, you'll also see the frequency ranking of the word in 6 types of corpora: subtitles, weibo, blogs, literature, news and technology (see the screenshot below). The subtitle word frequencies are based on SUBTLEX, and the other 5 are based on BLCU Chinese Corpus (see this thread). I thought others might find it useful. To install it, you'll need to purchase Pleco's flashcard add-on to access the user dictionary options. Next, download the zip file attached to this post, and extract it to get a plecofreq.pqb file which you'll need to put on your phone. In Pleco go to Settings -> Manage Dictionaries -> Add User -> Existing, then locate the plecofreq.pqb file. In the next post I'll attach a text file with the raw entries (as it's too large to attach to this post). There are a total of 109207 entries, which includes all words which are in the top 50,000 most frequent words in at least one of the 6 corpora. The pinyin of the words is based on the CEDICT dictionary, and is left blank if the word isn't in CEDICT. plecofreq.zip
  50. 1 point
    Port forwarding over SSH to a remote proxy that runs on a private machine outside of China. Works a treat. Although technically this counts as tunneling, not vaulting
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