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Popular Content

Showing most liked content since 01/15/2018 in all areas

  1. 5 points
    First semester is over and exams are finished! It feels strange to be entering into my big break now, rather than in between years, but it's still a very welcome break. I was very pleased with how my exams went, and finished with 94, 96, 98 and 99, in speaking, comprehensive, listening and reading/writing respectively. Obviously those are pretty good grades, but to be honest I don't think they are all that meaningful, and while I do of course want to score high in my exams, the emphasis has to be on actually being able to effectively use Chinese! I enjoy exams as they are great for showing me my limits and areas that need the most work, but with something as vast as a language I think it is hard to put together a 2 hour test, especially at this point in our learning. Although I think it changes in the future, our speaking final didn't even have any speaking on it! Stand out things across my exams - TONES! Still the hardest thing for me is distinguishing tones that I hear. The only reason I was able to do so well on my listening was because I knew the majority of the words that came up in the pinyin sentences, and so was able to mark the tones on them before even hearing them on the audio. Other than just continuing to listen as much as possible, I am not sure what else I can do to get better at this. Knowing when something is wrong - although I haven't seen the graded exams, I imagine this was the section I dropped most marks on in my speaking test. We were given 10-15 sentences to change, and told that some are right and some are wrong. I only left one sentence unedited. While I don't think I had too much trouble writing correct sentences, I felt that I probably edited some which were actually written correctly, because I simply wasn't sure enough. Reading/writing - while I love pretty much everything about Chinese, this is definitely the part I enjoy most. It's also the part I can do the most self study on! I was a little bit nervous about this exam as I hadn't been to class, and while I had studied plenty of extra stuff, I wasn't sure that I had spent enough time making sure I did actually know the content in the book. Thankfully I was fine, and the extra stuff I have been doing has also paid off, as it meant I knew almost all of the characters across all 4 exams (there are always characters included that we haven't learned, which will steadily increase over the next period, until we have learned a lot more in our own time). It feels good to get a head start here, and I want to try and keep this up. All in all I am really pleased, and encouraged to keep cracking away and working hard! I'm not sure how much I will get done over the break, but I am not going to punish myself if I don't do a ton! My family are here and so we are going to be spending lots of time out and about, and having fun sledging in the snow here! I am trying to do at least something every day though, even if it is just reading over a text. I am also taking new vocabulary/characters and putting them into sentences, which I send to a Chinese friend to edit (trying to hit an average of 5 a day), then put into Pleco flashcards and reread those sentences every day to absorb the new stuff. This is to try and continue to build up my base of characters, as well as new vocabulary. I know this post is getting a bit long, but I have to say I am feeling the effectiveness of some of the things Imron wrote in a couple of threads. Since getting rid of my Anki decks and starting to only input vocabulary that I am actually reading, all of the new words have been coming up again and again! I heard one word in a song, so made a sentence to learn it, then saw it in a notice on the door of our building. I can definitely see the truth in words that are important for me to learn now appearing frequently in real life, and how an SRS is meant to mimic that process. Very cool!
  2. 5 points
    Zhang Jie 张洁 and Wang Anyi 王安忆 if you want to read slightly older stuff (1980s, just after the Cultural Revolution). For sex, drugs and rock & roll, Mian Mian 棉棉 (don't bother with Wei Hui). Di An 笛安 and Qiao Ye 乔叶 are some very new authors that I like. 笛安 is easier to read than 乔叶, but apart from that I can't say much about the difficulty of these authors in Chinese because I read them either in translation or quite some time ago. You could also just give 张爱玲 a try, if it's too difficult you can put her away and try again later. And Li Ang 李昂, but she is really difficult, so perhaps keep that for later. She's really good though.
  3. 4 points
    Me too, but unfortunately I'd have neither the patience nor discipline to handle that kind of training. I think the post touches on something that only now I'm becoming very cognisant of. That's the fact that intense drilling is perhaps not only beneficial but almost necessarily to make substantive progress learning a language. Somewhat related to the conversation above, last week I happened to read the introduction to the 1967 FSI Vietnamese course. The main point it made was that students need to learn to produce parts of speech spontaneously and that this requires extensive drilling. Such a method reminds me of the famous Tamu post on independent learning. While I don't know much about the latest trends or research in pedagogy, in my experience this kind of painful approach to language learning does appear to have a very successful track record for those who can commit to it. And it appeals to my intuitive belief that lots of language learning approaches now appeal to our laziness. Accordingly, over the last few weeks I've substantially changed the way I study Chinese when on my own. Before I had become lazy, merely moving on from a recorded sentence if I could understand it or, at most, repeat it in my head. This was a form of laziness that wasn't very helpful for developing an automaticity when using the language. Now when I do something like sentence flashcards I not only listen, but record every single sentence multiple times until I am satisfied I can produce it aloud with sufficient speed, accurate tones, and reasonable intonation. The one unexpected benefit I have found from this exercise is that the words and structures become deeply ingrained, even though I am focusing on the sounds rather than content of what I'm saying.
  4. 4 points
    From the Chinese embassy UK website:
  5. 4 points
    I recommend you the following resources: - 长沙话方言志 - 长沙方言词典 - (Trends in Linguistics. Studies and Monographs 162) Yunji Wu-A Synchronic and Diachronic Study of the Grammar of the Chinese Xiang Dialects-De Gruyter Mouton (2005) (includes Shaoyang dialect as well as other Xiang Dialects) You can find them all here: http://www.mediafire.com/folder/o9q0ztjrt0dge/湘語 To practice listening you can search for 越策越开心 on youtube, it's a very popular show from Hunan; C-Block (hiphop group) also has many songs in Changsha dialect. Some common vocabulary (Changsha Dialect): 自家 (自己) 别个(别人) 么子(什么)what 箇/咯(这)this 何解 (为什么)why 好多(多少)how much 一路(一起)together 莫(不要)don't 齿(理)她何解不齿人啰?(她为什么不理人啦) 咸(都) 乐(开玩笑)莫拿我乐啰(不要拿我开玩笑) 冇(没有) 宝气(傻气)小李伢子硬是有点宝气 堂客(老婆)wife 娭毑(祖母) 肚里(里面) 何至/何址(哪里)where 你到何至去?(你到哪里去) 何得了(怎么办) 何是(怎么)how
  6. 4 points
    Chinese Internet language is an informal language first appeared on the net to express ideas to events. With the characteristic of simplification, Chinese Internet slang is widely adopted and used in everyday life. It includes content relating to all aspects of life, social, mass media, economic, and political etc. According to their features, Chinese Internet language can be divided into five categories. 1. Chinese Internet Slang Numbers We have talked about Chinese Internet slang numbers in another article, so here we pass this part directly. If you want to know more information about Chinese web number terms, you can go to check that article. 2. Latin Alphabet Abbreviations To express what we mean in Chinese language, we will use Latin alphabet abbreviations in upper case letters in our daily life as well. SB: shǎbī (傻逼), means “idiot”, commonly used as an insult. BT: biàn tài (变态), means “abnormal”, usually used to criticize someone’s anomalous action. For example, a man likes to peep girls, and you can use BT to describe him. MM: mèimèi (美眉), means “(beautiful) girl”. GG: gēge (哥哥), refers to “boy, male friend, or guy”. NB: niúbī (牛逼), means “excellent or bold”, usually used to praise what someone have done. GF: the abbreviation of girlfriend, means nǚ pénɡ you (女朋友). BF: the abbreviation of boyfriend, means nán pénɡ you (男朋友). YY: yì yín (意淫), refers to “fantasizing, sexual thoughts”. MD: mā de (妈的), similar to “damn, fuck”. TMD: tā mā de (他妈的), means “damn, fuck” as well. TNND: tā niánɡ niánɡ de (他娘娘的), means “damn, fuck” as well. TT: tào tào (套套), means “condom”. JJ: jī jī (鸡鸡), means “penis”. 3. Chinese Abbreviations 造: the abbreviation of Chinese “知道(zhī dào)”, means “know”. 不造: the abbreviation of Chinese “不知道(bù zhī dào)”, means “don’t know”. 造不造: short for Chinese “知不知道(nǐ zhī bu zhī dào)”, means “do you know?”. 宣你: short for “喜欢你 (xǐ huɑn nǐ)”, means “like you”. 酱紫: short for “这样子(zhè yànɡ zi)”, means “be like this”. 表: short for “不要 (bú yào)”, means “don’t”. 4. New Chinese Network Language 屌丝: diǎo sī. means “loser”. 拉拉: lā lā. means “lesbian”. 小鲜肉: xiǎo xiān ròu, refers to “young, cute and handsome boy, usually 12-25 years old”. 女神: nǚ shén, refers to beautiful girls. 女汉子: nǚ hàn zi, refers to women who possess traditionally masculine personality traits. 萝莉: luó lì, usually used to describe girls who are cute and look very small. 单身狗: dān shēn ɡǒu, commonly to describe those who have no boyfriend or girlfriend. 脱单: tuō dān, means “to get rid of single status”. 狗带: ɡǒu dài, transliteration of “go die”, means “dead”. 撩妹: liáo mèi, means “to flirt with girls”. 老司机: lǎo sī jī, refers to someone who is very experienced or good at a certain field. 蓝瘦香菇: lán shòu xiānɡ ɡū. This network slang is related to “nán shòu xiǎnɡ kū”, which means “feel very sad and want to cry”. 马甲: mǎ jiǎ. If someone registers more than two accounts in a forum, the accounts (except for most famous account) is named 马甲. 潜水: qián shuǐ, refers to someone who joins a group or forum seldom or never publish content. 菜鸟: cài niǎo, means “newbie”. 刷屏: shuā pínɡ, refers to a section on the Internet is swamped by posts from a same ID. 沙发: shā fā, refers to the place of the first comment of a certain post. 驴友: lǘ yǒu, means “backpacker” and refers to those who gather together to travel around. 3Q: means “thank you”. 波霸: bō bà, refers to female who have big breasts. 备胎: bèi tāi, means “spare wheel” and refers to those who are used to replace the person originally fixed for something. For example, a girl has a boyfriend but she still flirts with other boys. Then these boys are her 备胎. 大姨妈: dà yí mā, means “menstrual period”. 渣男: zhā nán, usually used to describe a man who has girlfriend or wife has an affair with others. 宅男: zhái nán, refers to men who tend to stay at home instead of hanging out. 宅女: zhái nǚ, similar to 宅男, but used to describe women who always stay at home. 腐女: fǔ nǚ, refers to those girls who are interested in the works about boy’s love. 秒杀: miǎo shā. It means killing someone in the game or getting something in the panic buying quickly. 房奴: fánɡ nú, refers to those who need to save money to repay the loan after purchasing house. 剩女: shènɡ nǚ, means leftover women who are already 30 years old. 月光族: yuè ɡuānɡ zú, refers to those who spend almost all of his/her earnings. 5. Chinese Contractions 白富美: bái fù měi, refers to girls who are young, pretty, rich and fair-skin. 矮穷矬: ǎi qiónɡ cuó, refers to men who are short, ugly and poor. 亲: qīn, the abbreviation of “dear”. 人艰不拆: rén jiān bù chāi, means “Life is already hard , so don’t expose the truth”. 累觉不爱: lèi jué bù ài, means “too tired to love”. 不明觉厉: bù mínɡ jué lì, means that you think something interesting or someone awesome although you have no idea about this person or what happened. 喜大普奔: xǐ dà pǔ bēn, means “The news is so exhilarating that everyone is celebrating and spreading it to the rest of the world”. (Commercial link removed by Lu.)
  7. 3 points
    One of only a very few pieces that Beethoven wrote for the mobile phone.
  8. 3 points
    Thank you for your feedback Shelley and Geiko. I think your assessment of what went wrong is accurate . I did most of my research regarding the test format online in a haphazard way and maybe should have gotten a real guide or used this forum instead. Geiko, I took the test here in the US at a local university, and it was computer based. They were nice folks... so I won't say which University in case it wasn't the official process . Also, there was another guy in the room taking the level 1, and he got his results immediately after as well. Also the pinyin input method was kind of strange. I have been practicing on WeChat and I'm able to string a large number of characters together with ease, but not so with the input interface provided for the exam. Perhaps my pinyin was not 100% accurate, but I eventually figured out what I wanted to write by doing 1 or 2 characters at a time. I think my ego demands that I give this another try in February.
  9. 3 points
    I think it's “中国玉屏”. 玉屏 is an autonomous county in Guizhou province.
  10. 3 points
    For as long as I can remember, Chinese carriers have required that mobile phones be switched off during flight; cabin staff would not allow their use even in flight mode to play music or watch movies. As of Thursday 18 January this changed;.You are now permitted to use them in airplane mode, even during take-off and landing. I flew China Eastern domestic the morning of the 18th and the Flight Attendants made repeated happy announcements about the change. That was on a domestic flight from Kunming to Qingdao. A different crew made the same announcement later the same day during my international flight from Qingdao to San Francisco. Apparently, it's a "customer-friendly" rule they had been lobbying for several years. They said the policy was not just for their airline, or for this particular flight, but was a broad revision in the China Aviation Rules. I was flying Business Class, but staff told me the new policy applied throughout the entire plane, economy as well as business. Has anyone else who has flown since then had the same first-hand experience? As a frequent air traveler I welcome this change. It add a degree of convenience on long flights and puts China carriers more in step with other global airlines.
  11. 3 points
    That's a relief, long may it last! When I read the news, I had nightmarish visions of a planeload of people shouting on their phones all through a transatlantic flight.
  12. 3 points
    I'm only 5 episodes in and I can tell you that it seems worth watching so far. Ignoring the secondary benefit of training your listening ability in addition to your reading, the biggest benefit of watching Chinese media is that you learn to better understand China and Chinese culture. If you watch, say, HIMYM with Chinese subtitles, you'd just be learning Chinese that has been translated from English. I'm sure you'd also be able to learn about American culture, relationships, and humour, as well as how life in New York for a group of 20 somethings might be like (taken with a grain of salt). That's probably very fascinating to a Chinese person, but would it really be that interesting to you? The fact that I have to struggle to understand the Chinese content also makes it that much more rewarding. If a series similar to 漂亮的李慧珍 was released in my own language, I doubt I would've cared to watch it all the way through. But if I'm watching it and a character cracks a cheesy joke, the fact that it is in Chinese makes it funnier to me than it should be, and it feels good to have understood something as complicated as a joke made by a person from a completely different culture. I'm not saying that I don't watch any Western series, because I do. Nor am I able to sit through a viewing of any shitty Chinese show. If you're able to watch Homeland (with Chinese subtitles) and can turn that into a deep discussion (in Chinese) regarding American foreign politics, the military industrial complex and the CIA with then that's just great! More power to you. But if someone refuses to watch any Chinese TV series because it just happens to not be of the same excellent standard as Breaking Bad/Game of Thrones/Mad Men/<insert Emmy winning series>, then I'd tell that person to get down from their high horse and ask why they're even learning Chinese in the first place.
  13. 3 points
    @stapler I don't think you would've had to worry about discipline. Remember, these are military schools. Many years ago, on another planet in a different galaxy, I studied a non tonal language in a similar school. The people studying Chinese not only got the drilling in class, but every school night, they had mandatory study hall for two hours, starting at 8:00pm. Being assigned to this school was considered a very good duty assignment, and exceptionally qualified people were allowed to come back and study as many as three languages (related or unrelated). I remember a sign on the wall in the Navy liaison office admonishing students, "You fail, you sail...". In other words, continued attendance at the school depended on a student's academic performance. As to the drilling of sentence patterns, what we referred to as "drill and kill", unfortunately, it seems to often follow the vagaries of academic trends. My teachers were ordinary people (apothecaries, minor diplomats, Muslim religious scholars, and the wives or husbands of other teachers) who followed a pre-prepared curriculum. Now, there seems to be a good many academics eager to try out their theories on a captive audience. I'd like to think the quality of instruction hasn't suffered. In my case, I haven't used my 'target' language for business in thirty or more years, but I can still walk into a room and sit down and participate in a meaningful way. Three months of practice and review, and I would feel as confident as I am in the language of the country I've lived in now for half my life. So, obviously, I try to use the lessons I learned at that school in my study of Chinese. (Sorry, just a rant brought on by a serious case of nostalgia...) TBZ
  14. 3 points
    If you mean she physically has two passport books, then it should still be 本. If you mean she has two passports from different countries, then 国.
  15. 3 points
    I imagine you'll need to just pick it up as you go along. It's a noble idea, but I doubt that learning their local language is actually practical unless you go there and live full time where it's spoken. I tried learning elementary bits of Hani language (a Yunnan minority.) Gave it up after a short while. Not only are the words and grammar different, but the thought process behind quite a few elements of it are different as well. Me -- How do you say 你好 in Hani language? Girlfriend -- Oh, we never say that. Me -- You must be kidding. What if your mother walks through the door after having gone into the village to buy stuff? Girlfriend -- "x5rg#bf55p%w9b." That means 哦,你回来了。 And the speech she and her friends from the same mountain hamlet use is different from the Hani language that her married sister who lives on the next mountain uses with her husband's family and friends. And the Yi minority people who live on those two mountains struggle to talk among themselves as well as with their Hani neighbors. Commerce and better roads have served to diminish these language barriers, but they still exist. The school systems come up against it during the elementary years. It's an interesting business.
  16. 3 points
    Translating Verräter as 反了他 is 空耳. But the origin of 反了他了 is not 空耳. 反 = 造反、反叛 = to rebel, revolt 某处反了某人 = 有某人在某处造反 is quite common an expression is 章回体小说 and most certainly is not influenced by European languages. For example: 《封神演義》第十二回:話說李靖在關上無事,忽聞報天下反了四百諸侯。忙傳令出,把守關隘,操演三軍,訓練士卒,謹提防野馬嶺要地。 《金瓶梅詞話》第一回:話說宋徽宗皇帝,政和年間,朝中寵信高、楊、童、蔡四個奸臣,以致天下大亂,黎民失業,百姓倒懸;四方盜賊蜂起,罡星下生人間,攪亂大宋花花世界。四處反了四大寇。那四大寇:山東宋江,淮西王慶,河北田虎,江南方臘,皆轟州劫縣,放火殺人,僭稱王號。惟有宋江替天行道,專報不平,殺天下贓官污吏,豪惡刁民。 In the colloquial expression 反了他了 the syntax is somewhat unusual but still Chinese. It basically means 如此放肆,他想造反不成?! It's a sort of hyperbole, equating domestic violence for example to high treason. There's some native speakers tying to explain the expression here: https://hinative.com/ja/questions/6026562 In the OP's example, the brother is speaking to his sister about her husband, so the third person 他 is used. If he is speaking to himself or to the husband, the second person 你 may be used, e.g. 还反了你了. Here's another page explaining 反了你了: https://ameblo.jp/tomoko-vivi/entry-12293665573.html
  17. 2 points
    I've been keeping up voice conversations online, and am returning to local language exchange events. I think I freaked out a couple of Chinese speakers by sitting at a mahjong table and playing at their speed. I've also booked a flight to Taiwan and, in a huge personal departure, plan to meet a lot of new people and involve myself in social things, rather than wander around for 12 hours a day just looking at stuff. In order to find more events there I also created a Facebook account, which just ugh.
  18. 2 points
    Is Chinese people calling non-Chinese people 老外 really a huge problem in the grand scheme of things? And is it any worse than Japanese people calling foreigners "gaijin"? In my university, I got to know a bunch of Chinese students. Out of them, there's one Chinese person who is quite... special. I befriended a bunch of people (including him) on WeChat and I was able to see the comments he posted on other people's pictures, as well as starting to receive comments myself. Someone made a joking post about the Queue and I remember him getting worked up over it and commenting on that person's post, talking about how it was such a huge insult to the Han people. I figured that maybe some Chinese people were just that way and I just ignored it. One day I saw him in real life on campus. Luckily he didn't recognize me, but I could hear parts of his conversation from some distance away, and it sounded like he was ranting about 老外 this and 老外们 that. Cue a later point and I was with a group of my friends who had joined my university at the same time. I mentioned this guy and everyone basically rolled their eyes and the stories poured out. One guy straight up told me he that he was weird. Another girl told me of how they had discussed booking the same flight from their city in China to my city, but he pissed off my friend when he insisted on taking a really convoluted and expensive route that would've had them landing here at a very inconvenient time, all because he didn't want to fly through certain "bad" countries. The last girl told me that she had overheard him in a class they shared, where he had sat behind my friend and next to another female Chinese girl and was telling (read: bragging to) her about his dad and granddad who had apparently both been in the army and were heroes and such and such. So basically, no one really seemed to like him, but because they were polite and value group cohension they just tolerated him until they had managed to settled themselves down a little. When I saw the guy and heard him talk about us 老外, it really did piss me off. But now, in hindsight and in light of that conversation I had with my friends, I think that the whole thing is quite pathetic. The guy who is the most proud of being Chinese is also the least liked person by all the other Chinese. And it would be a real shame if I let that kind of person affect me when I've had so many enjoyable encounters with other Chinese people. PS: Using Youtube comments to make any kind of judgement of Chinese people (or people in general), is not something I would recommend at all.
  19. 2 points
    Jianshui Old Town 建水故城 is full of cultural relics, and one that's outstanding is the Confucius Temple. It's one of the best preserved and is the second largest in all of China, second only to the one at his birthplace in Qufu, Shandong 山东省曲阜市。I've been to both and like this one better because it isn't so vast; the compound in Qufu is too big to tour on foot. It was built during the Yuan Dynasty 元代 about the year 1285, and like many such places, it has been restored many times. The pamphlet you get at the door on the way in after paying your 60 Yuan says it has been rebuilt 40 times. I went early one morning shortly after it opened at 8 a.m. The only people there were the early bird exercise walkers and one diligent sweeper. I entered from the rear gate, right onto a statue of the big man himself and the peaceful lake, nicknamed "scholar sea" 学海。 Walking around the peaceful lake gave a view of the bridge and one of the gate tower complexes before the sun was high in the sky. Each of these gates has a ceremonial name. Although I admired the architecture, I was glad I wasn't being towed around by a tour guide who wanted to read all the inscriptions out loud. In fact, I didn't see any tour groups the whole time I was there. Another gate and a gardener hard at work on his ladder trimming the tropical trees still in full bloom even though it was early January. Eat your heart out Dongbei 东北。Throughout the grounds were a number of smaller pagodas where one could study or just enjoy the peace and quiet. I suddenly heard the sounds of ancient music, strings, woodwinds, cymbals and gongs. Followed the sound and discovered some sort of musical performance by men and women in robes with scholar's hats. Sat down to enjoy this unexpected bonus. The music would pause from time to time and one of the men would stand and approach the main alter, bowing and reciting some sort of verse, perhaps something by Confucius. Afterwards I walked into the main hall behind the musicians to see the statues of Confucius and probably some of his disciples. Confucian thought isn't really a religion, but it sure has some of the trappings of one. You could kneel and pray, burn incense and make offerings. Made my way out, passing some less used areas. Eventually reached the main gate and got another look at those delicate flowers. (Do any of you know their name? Just wondering.) It was Sunday morning and outside the main gate people were dancing. A cluster of ladies were doing folk dances with drums, while nearby couples were waltzing. It was another one of those "only in China" moments.
  20. 2 points
    I also came to a similar conclusion in my studies and have been saying the same thing for years. The laziness thing is also important to be aware of, especially if you are relying predominantly on SRS because often the standard people hold themselves to for 'knowing' a word in a revision is not the standard required for using that word in real life. The example I often provide is for reading. To read well you need instant recognition for more or less every word. If you are not treating anything less than instant recognition as a fail, then you don't 'know' the words well enough to be used for reading, leading to many 'known' words not actually being known well enough to use. I think this is one of the major losses caused by the move towards 'smarter' learning rather than rote learning. Rote learning and drilling have their drawbacks, but as you've noticed, it ingrains the language in such a way that you can use it without thinking. Smarter learning definitely has its place, but you need to supplement it with drilling and repetition in order to build muscle memory and automatic reflexes for the language.
  21. 2 points
    But 这个书 should be okay, even preferable in, say, 这个书有电子版下载吗?
  22. 2 points
    How do you know whether you are complying with the regulation on this sign?
  23. 2 points
    Count me in, too. @dnevets I am glad someone else thinks the mother is good, too. I have seen just shy of the first ten episodes, and I found her so realistically irritating that I tried halfheartedly to find out her real name so I could see what else she has done. I wasn't able to figure it out, though.
  24. 2 points
    “Agree, but I am too old to understand internet talk even in English." I was going to raise just this point. That is, language -- English and Chinese and whatever -- sometimes carries a degree of age-appropriateness, slang especially. So it'd be interesting to mark out what's appropriate for teens, for young adults, and for those over an age we won't even mention. Dictionaries rarely if ever do this. Similarly, there are sometimes gender-appropriate aspects to language, which dictionaries ignore.
  25. 2 points
    Yes, and it's the term the railway uses for late trains: “本查询仅提供过去1小时和未来3小时内列车正晚点信息。” http://www.12306.cn/mormhweb/kyfw/lczwdcx/ Not to mention, "同学们,我们来得太晚了。“
  26. 2 points
    待(一)会儿 等(一)会儿 之后再(说/做……) (but this one implies that there's something happening first that all parties involved are aware of)
  27. 2 points
    in Mandarin, we use 待会儿 or 过一会儿。 晚一点 actually means you will do it at night, but Mandarin speakers don't use 晚一点..if they use it, usually means they will do it at night not later. You will hear 晚一点 mostly in Southern China or Taiwan. Northern China not many people would say 晚一点。 等一下/maybe Taiwan Chinese or Southern China) is not precise, actually means hold on, it doesn't mean that you are committed, you are basically asking them to wait or hold-on 回头 means 下一回, it doesn't specify any time frame, it could be next time, months or years. not precise. I think this is a good topic to talk about, maybe I will ask my husband to do a video on this topic. I hope the answer helps.
  28. 2 points
    待會(兒) 等(一)下 晚(一)點
  29. 2 points
  30. 2 points
    To be fair, the only reason I make my videos is to help people understand China so that if they do end up living in or visiting China they can avoid some of the many pitfalls and issues I have encountered over the years. I enjoy sharing my experiences of living in China with my subscribers and they are the reason why I keep making videos, there isn’t any sort of sinister motivation or schemes unfortunately, it’s just a bloke sharing his opinions
  31. 2 points
    Yes. And each carriage or two also also has a boiling water dispenser to use with your instant noodles 方便面。No train ride is complete without one dose of them. The price has gone up now to 6 Yuan if you buy from the person pushing the food trolley. I remember trying to wash an apple with that boiling water on my first train ride a long time ago. That did not work out very well.
  32. 2 points
    First of all, thanks so much @grawrt, for taking the time out of your crazy busy schedule to update us on what life is like as a TI grad student in China. It's been really fascinating and exciting for me to get the foreigner's perspective on Chinese MATI in China itself (since I did mine in the US). I really love this insight, and that you went back to your First Impressions post to see if they were true or not! I also labored under that first impression when I was in my MATI course, and came away with a similar take away towards the end of the first semester. One of my professors told me in a nutshell that in comparison to my Chinese classmates (who had across the board decent-to-good TI skills), my TI skills and background suffered, but that I had “内容和想法”, which my Chinese classmates lacked. I think this really feeds into your "a lot of my classmates don't really know much about the world" insight. I think it is especially worse for your classmates who are all in China. My classmates were doing their MATI outside of China, so I think that specific trait was at least alleviated, but there was still quite a lot of residual ignorance. To be fair, how could they be knowledgeable about the world when the typical life of a Chinese student is so narrow? I think it's unfortunate that you feel this way. If it makes you feel any better, I felt the same way at MIIS, and that school is based out of America! Due to the sheer volume of Chinese students, it's just annoying to be in courses a non-native Chinese speaker when 90% or more of your classmates don't speak English natively. I'm sure it's even worse for you in China since everything skews towards China and Chinese people, and there's this surprising lack of awareness of how differently foreigners have to handle administrative crap. I only had to deal with the academic bullshit in about 75% of my classes, but sounds like you're dealing with it both in and out of the classroom. I wonder if this is sort of part of the whole "Chinese people overwhelmingly adore foreigners for no good reason" mentality. Whereby your classamtes see 外国人 and immediately assume that your teachers automatically adore you and give you guys all the advantages because you are special. Also the fact that you are going to pass your classes just because you are foreigners I'm sure galls them as well, which is pretty shit not just for them, but for you as well I'm sure. I know if that happened to me, I'd be pissed, because I'd want to pass on my own merits, and not because I'm "different". I'm so glad to hear that you foreign students have become each other's support group, because that's so critical in a major like this, especially when there's a sense that the Chinese classmates are all pre-disposed against you. I remember early on in the program when I still didn't have any friends in the Chinese program, just going home every night and crying myself to sleep, because I was so depressed at how badly I was doing in class, and how horrible my Chinese was compared to my classmates' English. I found that making friends with my Chinese classmates did take a lot longer than making friends with other TI students in other programs (my first group of friends at MIIS were all non-Chinese TI students in the French, Spanish, German etc. programs), and I didn't really get close with any of my Chinese classmates until my second semester. I wonder if that will be the case with you as well. Most of my friends from the TI program are the classmates who were my practice partners. I don't know if that's a thing at BISU or not, but every week, I would practice in 2 hour blocks with a variety of different classmates (I typically had about 6-10 classmates in a semester that I practiced with), and I was able to slowly build close or closer friendships with them. We still connect with each other occasionally. One of my colleagues who studied at both MIIS and 广外 told me that she's closer to her MIIS classmates than her 广外 classmates, and that friendships rarely last. I've noticed that with my Chinese classmates too, that about 25-50% of them don't really make the effort to make friends with you or keep you as a friend if they don't think they can get any advantage from you, and they're pretty transparent about it. So I'm not sure if that's just a "thing" with them.
  33. 2 points
    A whole pile of things just happened so I'll bullet point them: I rejigged HelloTalk entirely to find potential long-term language partners and good friends (I'll elaborate in a HelloTalk thread), and as a result I'm already finding some brilliant people I get along with. Having sorted the above, I've been having regular voice conversations with people online, and apart from lots of tripping over myself and some terrible grammar, I always get through hours without any real problem. Yesterday I met one of the people I spoke to online. We had breakfast and talked for five hours, half of which was all Chinese. Then we went to a language meetup and I did another full hour of Chinese. Across the whole day, I understood nearly everything. So I suppose this means I'm back.
  34. 2 points
    Anyone watching 我的前半生? I'm nearly halfway - episode 20 (of 42). It's well-acted, decent story, not too difficult to understand, sensible number of characters/plots to follow, and (most importantly) the main female character has a delightfully annoying mother. Pretty rare that something holds my attention for this many episodes, so it's a thumbs-up from me.
  35. 2 points
    Thanks to stephanhodges for introducing me to this forum. Long time ago I too studied some Chinese, but alas not enough.... I'm flattered that you have found my site and discussed the chorus method. Admittedly, this is a stone-age method, not an invention of mine, but it certainly has several benefits, many of which can be scientifically corroborated, and many of which I have only understood thanks to my medical training on top of a PhD in speech science. (I have listed 11 "heavy" benefits in my presentation when I give talks about this.) The main effect why chorus practice is so efficient is due to brain anatomy and physiology: ***First, as most of you have surely experienced, it is quite difficult for untrained singers to sing in a different tune or pitch than the others in a choir. Similarly when you sing-along with friends in a "Happy birthday to you...", etc. And you must have felt the phenomenon when you are listening to someone with a creaky or hoarse voice, whereby you get a strange tickle and strong urge to clear your own throat! These experiences are due to two important neuroanatomical and neurophysiological facts that, of course, also apply to _speaking_ in chorus. (i) In the vicinity of the speech area in the frontal lobe (Broca's area) there are networks of nerve cells called "imitation neurons", or "mirror neurons". They are important in perception processes by matching input data with our previous experiences ("memories") of saying the same or similar things. The best studied mirror neurons are involved in visual perception. Look it up in Google and Wikipedia, and you'll find amazing reports. (Giacomo Rizzolatti is a grand name.) The most amazing thing to note about these mirror neurons is that they are _motor_ neurons! I.e., they are active when the individual _speaks_. And, obviously, when the individual _hears_ speech, if this speech is in a comprehensible form, i.e., he or she has previous experience of saying like things. Otherwise they don't mirror the input. We all have noticed that as new beginners in a language class, haven't we?! (ii) Direct neural connections from the auditory center in the temporal lobes to the auditory mirror neuron areas have been found. These connections don't themselves pass via the speech comprehension area (Wernicke's area), so the mirroring processes begin even before the listener is aware of them or of the meaning of the input. These mirroring processes in the brain's _motor_ area will directly influence the speech organs of the listener and enable, or even _enforce_, like magically, a very accurate pronunciation as he or she speaks along with the teacher. So even a "chorus" of 2 persons, or 1 cd + 1 learner, is possible, but I have found that 8 learners is a minimum number for maximal efficiency, and 7 learners is too few; a strange "step function" here. Maybe partly because the loud sound impact of the chorus triggers the Lombard voice reflex that makes us unconsciously speak louder. I don't know the upper limit. "Crazy-English" Li Yang may well be on the right track... At least for his revenues... ;-) http://www.china.org.cn/english/NM-e/83370.htm (I too ought to have been an English teacher in China! Hehe.) The conclusion from these first facts is that the learners will need lots of listening practice (in active, attentive silence) before they can have a fair chance to imitate. The teacher should solo-repeat the sample sentence (seldom single words) at least 7 or 8 times at a natural rate of speech before the learners are invited or permitted to speak along. Then when they start speaking in chorus, they will have to concentrate on the rhythm of speech, which has been shown to be one of the most important, if not THE most important, factor for perception and thus also for a listener-friendly pronunciation. NB: The teacher too keeps speaking in the chorus, dominating it to "enforce" a natural and correct rate and rhythm. The learners should be encouraged to begin and end synchronously. Initially also to cheat with any difficult consonants and vowels, if necessary. (This is how toddlers do when acquiring their first language! And they never get a "foreign accent" even if they can't pronounce the indivdual sounds; this is so because they have the correct rhythm almost from the very beginning of speech acquisition. Obviously a good idea also for adult learners.) Further on, the language class will alternate fairly frequently between teacher-solo and teacher+chorus. And when some confidence is built up, also learner-soloes. (At most in chunks of 3-4 solo repetitions in these individual-practice-chorus-practice alternations, to avoid embarrassment for those who need more practice time to reach the target.) ***Second, the chorus repetitions (with alternations as above) will have to go on for a great multitude of times. In all other practices for skilled performance, such as athletics, music, circus, type-writing, car driving, surgery etc., it goes without saying that one has to practice many, many times to acquire sufficient skill. Unfortunatly, this self-evident knowledge seems to have gone "out of fashion" in language education since decades ago, and now is almost forgotten. This is where I want to change the current routines. 20-30 repetitions is certainly too few. A hundred may be more appropriate. By the thousands must be better - but we have a limit to our patience and endurance, too, haven't we! But a toddler actually practices his speech much more than thousands of times, more closely to a zillion times. It does take some 5-6 years to acquire the very basic command of one's first language, doesn't it! Fortunately, adults can do it in a single year or less - if given appropriate instructions. The 146 (!) speech muscles are no different than any other muscles in the way they are run by the nervous system. They have to be co-trained and co-ordinated, in our first language as well as in all our subsequent languages. In learning a new language and speech, we do need lots of repetitions. This is also due to neurophysiology, and specifically to the way neurons connect with one another with _synapses_, as they are called. Buds for new synapses are formed within seconds in a learning situation, and mature synapses within 10-15 minutes. If they are reinforced by repetitious stimuli. With too few repetitions, the buds may regress, and no synapses are permanented, and the time spent on that "pseudo-practice" will have been largely wasted. It has been shown that a new skill, e.g. one sample sentence, can be automated and permanented to perfection in about 15 minutes. It will have to be repeated the next day, too, and the next, and the next.... But then! Unforgettable! Like we can never un-learn how to drive a car, or walk, or talk, once we have learnt it. In a simile, I say that learning and memory is like walking across a lawn: Paths will form where you walk sufficiently many times. And nowhere else! And all new paths have to be connected with older paths. I.e., we can't learn much without some pre-knowledge; every peice of new knowledge is a variation of old knowledge. Such as *speaking* - we are all super-experts on at least one language, aren't we! All human speech is based on the same fundamental principles, e.g., rhythm, melody, consonants, vowels, syllables, words, sentences, ..., etc., and we all have the same anatomy and neurology, etc. So just tweak it a bit - and voila - there's your new language! ;-) Phew.... Please pardon my verbosity... ;-) I could go on and on for weeks, presenting one neurophonetic miracle after another! Let this suffice for now lest you flame me for occupying bandwidth, and good luck, everyone! Olle in Sweden
  36. 1 point
    Do use this as a place to come to for information and to ask questions regarding applications for the Chinese Government Scholarships for 2018. I have found that in past years, people have been tremendously helpful in addressing questions and concerns and I expect that this year's thread shall be no different. For this year, we have set up a whole subforum for CSC. Do peruse all of the topics and please try to keep pertinent questions and concerns under the appropriate topic. While we do encourage you to ask questions about the process here, we also encourage you to check out the following websites first (and check them out again and again!). The CSC has gotten better over the years in producing more transparent information about the process and a lot of questions can be answered by simply checking out the following websites: CSC main page: http://en.csc.edu.cn Study in China page: http://www.csc.edu.cn/laihua/indexen.aspx Intro to Chinese Government Scholarships: http://www.csc.edu.cn/laihua/scholarshipdetailen.aspx?cid=97&id=2070 Universities that accept scholarship students and their programs: http://www.csc.edu.cn/laihua/universityen.aspx Preparation of Application: http://www.csc.edu.cn/laihua/newsdetailen.aspx?cid=66&id=1145 Information about Scholarship Application: http://www.csc.edu.cn/laihua/newsdetailen.aspx?cid=66&id=3074 Also, DO email representatives at your desired universities as well as representatives of the Chinese Embassy in your home country with your questions. They have answers and they are willing to help you. The application process is now open. The application deadlines should be in early April, but do check the specific application deadline for your home country. To apply, contact and send your application to a Chinese embassy/consulate located in your home country. For example, Australians must apply at the Chinese embassy in Australia, and Americans must apply at the Chinese embassy in America. People currently in China can also apply, but they still have to mail their applications to a Chinese embassy in their home country! For people that are only applying for Chinese Language (as opposed to a degree), you can choose between 1 or 2 years. For people who are pursuing a degree, you can request 1 or 2 years of Chinese Language study BEFORE taking your classes if you either can't speak Chinese or need it improved. WE DO NOT KNOW THE CHANCES OF GETTING THIS SCHOLARSHIP FOR ANY COMBINATION OF THESE CHOICES. We don't know if we have a better chance of getting a partial or full scholarship, or if it's easier to get it if you request 1 or 2 years. Nor do we know how much your GPA matters, or if already having Chinese language skills hurts/helps you, or if having been to China before means you get extra points. Whatever it is, we don't know. Programs generally start in September, but there are also a few that start in March.... and SUMMER CLASSES are NOT included in the scholarship. If you already received the scholarship and wish to extend it you will need to apply again. First talk to your school or any contact to see what your options are. This is where your application will be going: Steps for Embassy application 1. You send your application to a third party representative of CSC (maybe your school). 2. The third party (OR you can apply directly) sends application to your native country's China Embassy. 3. Your native country's China Embassy sends your application to the Beijing CSC office. 4. The Beijing CSC office sends your application to your selected schools. 5. If and when a school accepts you, your acceptance is sent to the Beijing CSC office. 6. The Beijing CSC office sends your acceptance to your native country's China Embassy. 7. The China Embassy sends your acceptance and all needed documentation to you. Steps for direct application to universities for Post graduate applicants 1) Send your application to your preferred school 2) If admitted, school notifies you. 3) School sends it to CSC 4) CSC approves 5) School notifies you. 6) You get yourself into China At any step of this process your application may be rejected. Again we don't know why, how, or when the decision is made. In the end, the school gets a final say on whether you receive the scholarship or not. The Application 1. Proposed Study in China: e.g., Chinese Language Student 2. Duration of the Major Study: For people learning Chinese - you can study for either one or two years, starting in September. 3. Study or Research Plan: In the previous years, they required all applicants to write something like a personal statement that was no less than 400 words (THIS IS STILL TRUE FOR EU APPLICANTS and probably for "degree" applicants), but now, you can just write in a few sentences that you would like to learn Chinese. Feel free to write a full "study plan" if you'd like. 4. Organization/Person Recommending You: I say go for anything that sounds official: Use your university, your professor, the company you work for, this forum, whatever. 5. The Guarantor: Anyone you know in China. 6. Letters of Recommendation: It seems that letters of recommendations are NOT required for those studying Chinese and not pursuing a degree. This is also written on the website. Include them if you wish. Those who are pursuing a degree will need TWO letters of recommendation from professors/employers. 7. You need a notarized copy of your most recent transcript, and your high school diploma (for those who are still in university) or degree (if you already graduated from college). If it is not in English or Chinese, you need to get it translated into one of those two languages. 8. They want TWO copies of the application: send two of everything. The Foreigner Physical Examination Form You can get it filled out by your family doctor, internist, or a doctor from a clinic. As for the "photo section" - it requires either a signature or stamp on the photo and paper (half on/half off at the same time) so that it can act as a seal to prove that it is your photo and has not been tampered with. DO NOT send the ORIGINAL Foreign Physical Examination Form with either the CSC application or your visa application. Send copies. You keep the ORIGINAL with you - treat it like your passport (even though you'll never use it again). Post-Scholarship/In China Notification: If you get the scholarship (notification is sent to you sometime around May/June - some people were notified as late as August), CSC will send you a package filled with information on the selected school, an admission letter from that school, a letter reminding you that you must register at the school between certain dates, and the Visa Application Form for Study in China (JW201) already filled out by CSC. All you need to do is get the visa, book your flight, and come to China. Stipend: All fees are taken care of. The only thing you need to manage is your stipend. Some universities will give you an ATM card that gets money deposited in it every month, while others will require you to pick up cash from a certain office. The stipend is generally handed out at the end of the month. The stipend starts at 2500 RMB a month for bachelor's degree students, and then moves up to 3000 RMB a month for language students and master's degree students, and then tops out at 3500 RMB a month for doctorate students. Housing: The housing provided is the cheapest international students' accommodations the school offers. Usually, it's a tiny room with two desks, two closets, and two beds - without a private bathroom (you use a shared one with the rest of the floor). At some schools you can move to a nicer dorm, even to a single - as long as you pay the difference. If you consider moving off campus, check with your university to see if they will give you a monthly allotment to assist with paying rent. Some universities give CSC students a minimal amount to cover off-campus rent, some don't. This is a new thing. Insurance: ... ENGLISH-TAUGHT COURSES If you are applying for courses taught in English, be aware that these are often new and designed to attract high-fee paying foreign students. Check your scholarship will cover the fees. Also be aware that levels of English among teaching and administrative staff might not be as high as you want, and that new courses could be very disorganised - or sometimes just not exist. If possible try and find people who've already done the course. JOIN THE DISCUSSION - SAY HELLO Hello. Where are you applying from? Just studying Chinese or pursuing a degree? What did your local Chinese embassy say? Where and how did you get your papers notarized? Did you apply for your school of choice beforehand? Where did you get your Physical Exam done? Anything else you learned or would like to share? There is a lot of information you may find around these forums. If you find the application process to be too overbearing, we are here for you. Please be patient with the whole process and do put your best foot forward in the application process--this is an excellent opportunity for those of us who will get the scholarship so cherish it and do your best with it.
  37. 1 point
    Hey @ToussaintWilliams, from my understanding, that can be the case for obtaining a pre-admission letter, but only for certain schools. When I applied for the Chinese Language program two years ago having Fudan as my first choice, I did not bother getting a pre-admission letter but I got Fudan as my #1 choice. But also, Fudan doesn't give out pre-admission letters so you just have to apply through the embassy and hope for the best. Also from my understanding if you are applying for the scholarship through the Chinese embassy, you can attach a pre-admission letter (if you want to) but if you apply directly to the school, then its not necessary. But with applying directly, you have to pay application fees (through each school) which can get expensive but depending on your preference go with what you feels is best for you. If you apply through the Chinese Embassy, you don't pay any fees. I recommend to apply through the Chinese embassy in NY and request for the pre-admission letters from each school by doing the following: Attach it to your application and mail it to the embassy. You'll hear back much later than applying through the school but its somewhat an easier and cheaper process. Also about your study plan, I recommend to introduce yourself. Talk about what's influencing you to study Chinese, why you want to go, what's attracting you to China etc. When I wrote mine (I can't find my old study plan unfortunately) I wrote a short story on how I met a close friend of mine who came to study in America and she introduced me to Chinese language and culture (gave examples like how she cooked me traditional Chinese food, watch Chinese movies, and even show me how to write some Chinese characters). Get creative with it. It doesn't have to be so technical. I think you should keep the part you have so far but also use my suggestions and add that to the beginning of the study plan. I think you have a great start and you just need to add a few more lines. I hope this helps. Let me know if you need anything. I'll be reapplying as well so we'll see how it all goes down. I also encourage users to visit last year's forum. A lot of users have answered questions from what was said here before. If you feel like you haven't heard your question being answered, you can check it out here and also just wait till more people visit the forum for your question to be answered.
  38. 1 point
    Hi @Angelina As far as I know there is a small proportion of private universities in China, roughly 30% of all Chinese universities. However, they often found themselves unable to compete with public universities at least financially. Public universities all receive some funding from the government and are overseen by the government (the party) to various degrees. I remain somewhat critical of Chinese universities on bureaucracy. The overwhelming bureaucracy seen in Chinese universities has the tendency to solidify its own power, offering reasons for university officials to protect their own vested interests, rather than to fulfil their real responsibilities. It does not only corrupt the intended meritocracy in promoting real talents, but distance school bureaucrats from the people they are supposed to serve. For instance, my friend has run into this kind of situation where he needed this person from a school office to make his school card. The lady at that office looked rather indifferent to his request and he had to please this lady in order to make the procedure faster. I think overspecialization does exist in some cases. I heard about this researcher who has a really creative idea for project but his proposal was denied by his university because the officials did not think that would fit the university’s focuses. Increasing inefficiency, I think, is often criticized about Chinese universities. It is a real problem. And it is why some scholars endorse the competition among universities. And just for the sake of curiosity, can I ask what major you are in? I am studying sociology.
  39. 1 point
    My first thought was 册 -- it even looks like a passport -- and a quick Google search shows at least some use it.
  40. 1 point
    This Qing Dynasty 清代 estate is one of the main tourist draws of Jianshui, something not to be missed if you are anywhere close. It was built as a family compound complete with 42 courtyards and 214 rooms, occupying 50,000 square meters of grounds. It's arranged somewhat like a maze, and it's easy to get turned around. But if you wander long enough you will encounter family shrines, a clean blue-water lake and even a three-story pagoda. Many parts of the estate are fancifully named after places, people and events in "Dream of the Red Chamber" 红楼梦。 This is the main entrance, not far from West Gate. One must buy a ticket for 50 Yuan. They are open from early morning until 8 o'clock at night. Throughout the grounds one finds quite a few of these classic round "moon gates" 月亮门。They have the effect of inviting a guest to step through; they "draw you in." You walk from one courtyard to another in whatever order you choose. There are no big yellow directional arrows painted on the ground to regiment your flow or your course. It's not unusual to find serious photographers here carefully lining up their shots or analyzing lighting and shadows. Big heavy cameras are the rule, not the exception. In the early fall of the year, around National Day in October, one sees huge banks of large-head chrysanthemums. Now, in the deep middle of winter, the flowers are less spectacular, but still add small islands of color. Near one end of the grounds is a sparkling lake, watched over by a pair of pagodas. It is stocked with goldfish who don't seem disturbed by the chilly temperature of the water. No floating candy wrappers or cigarette butts here; the grounds are well maintained. This time of year is off season and there were not many visitors. It's a nice place to bring a book, a sandwich, and a thermos of tea. It's a nice place to go slow and pretend you are a poet. On the way out, I passed by a large room where an old man was writing calligraphy scrolls that you could buy to hang on a wall. I watched him a few minutes, said hello, and then left. I've visited at night and I've visited in the rain; I've visited when the overhead sun is blazing hot. It has always been a refreshing spot regardless of weather. One of several peaceful venues in Jianshui's Old Town 古城。
  41. 1 point
    Lu, 《盛世》was my first novel, but I had read books in Chinese before. 《毛主席语录》is not that difficult. The amount of specialized vocabulary varies by chapter. The vocabulary in a chapter like “社会主义和共产主义” is more challenging than in, say, “帝国主义和一切反动派都是纸老虎”. There is also a lot of repetition. Because the book is organized by topic, most of the challenging vocabulary clumps together. You’ll see 辩证唯物论 and 剥削阶级 ten times in two pages, then never again. You wrote above about some differences between male and female modern Chinese authors. What female Chinese authors (and women-written books) do you recommend? (I want to read 张爱玲, but fear she is beyond my ability.)
  42. 1 point
    Building a courtyard house like that must be a huge undertaking today. I did see some undergoing extensive renovation in Tuanshan Village 团山村, a few kilometers away. Went there one day by narrow-gauge train. Stopped by the famous double-dragon bridge 双龙桥 on the way. Will post pictures from there once I am given more space. Apparently I've hit my limit, but I've contacted Roddy to seek a remedy.
  43. 1 point
    Since I was mentioned in the original post and @roddy kindly pinged me, I'll share my opinion on this. In general, I think @艾墨本 has a point, but I think it's mostly a matter of how things are presented rather than the actual content. I apologise in advance if my post focuses too much on my own writing, but it seems like a good example since it was brought up, I'm here and the discussion is already in full swing! Most of the stuff written on Hacking Chinese is based on my own experience learning the language in various environments (including a master's program for teaching Chinese as a second language), teaching the language for many years, as well as research I've read or sometimes conducted myself (mostly about tones and tone acquisition). If it comes about as the Truth, that's not my intention. It even states that that's not the goal on the front page. However, I don't state this at the very beginning of each article. It's my website. I've written all the stuff (except a handful of guest posts, which are clearly labelled as such) and I don't think I need to say "hey, I wrote this, these are my opinions" in every paragraph or even in every article. There's no team of writers or people who aren't identifiable behind each article. There are of course instances where I should include reference, but don't. This is mostly because of sloppiness or because of lack of time (I've prioritised covering a wide range of topics rather than writing fewer articles with more references). In other words, it's not an anonymous site that dispenses information about the correct way of learning, it's one person (me) sharing my thoughts on learning and teaching the language. There's a big difference here! I have a background, which I've written quite a lot about and is open for everyone to see. When you read my articles, you can easily check who I am, what I've done, and if you think that what I say has value to you or not. That would not be true for an anonymous site that did the same. Even though this should go without saying, the posts on Hacking Chinese are not academic articles. They are indeed musings and were always meant to be. The site is basically my advice to learners of Chinese, based on everything I have learnt since I started learning. That doesn't automatically make them true, or true in all situations for all learners (which is actually something I often point out). However, I do still think they are valuable for others. I also believe they are more than "this is what I did and it worked", mostly because I have teaching experience as well as a relevant academic background. It's not only based on what I did and how it turned out. An interesting question is how much uncertainty should be included. I'm a cautious person and it used to be the case that I included many caveats in my articles. I still do, on average, and think the idea is to analyse a situation or problem in hindsight, offering enough information for a student to make his or her own decision about what to do. However, many (most?) students don't want that. They want advice of the kind "do x" or "use method y". They want to choose less and rely more on someone who has done what they are trying to do. That doesn't automatically make it right to provide them with that and throw all caveats to the winds, but it is worth bringing up. One example comes to mind, where I wrote an article about how to choose your Chinese course, since this is one of the most common questions I receive. The whole answer here can be summarised as "it depends", which is the only answer that it both true and short. Indeed, that's probably the answer to almost all questions about learning Chinese unless they are very specific. Note, though, that the second comment to this article repeats the question: What Chinese language school would you recommend in Taiwan or China? Broadening the debate a little, what should people like I do? Would it be better to publish fewer but more carefully researched articles with more references? This would be more like a literary overview, which it seems one can get by reading research papers instead. It probably would appeal to significantly fewer students, but would probably be more rewarding for those who like it. Should I point out more clearly what my sources are when referring to research? This is something I do when it's specific, but not always when it's not specific. It's definitely a good point and something I will try to improve. Perhaps listing references at the end might be enough? Or is it more about labelling, as I wrote above, about stating more clearly what the advice is based on? Would it be better if each article included a caveat that said that these thoughts and ideas are mainly based on my experience and opinions, even though that's true for most of the 400 articles? For me, that's already included in the general concept of a blog, but I might be wrong. Any other suggestions are more than welcome! I would also like to comment on the relevance of educational research. I tend to agree that most of the research relies on way too small samples and because of the wildly varying parameters between different learners, countries, educational contexts, and so on and so forth, we will never be able to have a purely scientific way of learning. However, this is not an excuse to ignore the research, unless the sample size is ridiculously low or the context somehow not relevant for the topic at hand (which is not uncommon). There are also many cases where the is quite substantial research, such as when it comes to vocabulary acquisition, and this should of course guide the way we learn and teach languages. But if we require evidence as a prerequisite for voicing an opinion about how to learn Chinese, we risk setting the bar so high that few people will be able to say anything at all.
  44. 1 point
    I go 散散步 all the time ;) But in relation to the topic, this is something I still sometimes struggle with. When it comes to vocabulary I encounter while reading, I often start by just assuming there is a one-syllable less formal way of representing most two-syllable verbs, and ask someone “what’s a less fancy way to say X.” I have never found passively absorbing from TV to be particularly helpful, except to pick up colloquialisms I may not have otherwise. I find it takes active asking, as native speakers often basically have no desire to point out all the weird ideosyncracies they notice in your speech unless you’re paying them.
  45. 1 point
  46. 1 point
    I’ve been wanting to make an index for flashcard decks of movies made with Subs2SRS. There are few floating around on the internet, and many have expired links. I hope this thread will help fill the gap. Please comment with any Subs2SRS decks you’ve made/found, and I’ll update this post with a link. Also, please report any errors you find! Click on the names to download the Anki file. Because the files are too big to upload to Chinese-Forums, the links will direct you to a file on my Google Drive. You can download without having an account or signing in. I've tried to make all of the decks in the same format, although I haven't deleted information to accomplish. This means, some decks have simplified, traditional, pinyin and English, while others have only simplified. If the original sources were packaged in a zip folder, I repackaged the deck and media for the deck in a .anki file, so all the user has to do is download and open in anki. I've also added tags and sorted by the sequence# (so that the movie is in order). If I changed the deck from the original, the name of the maker will lead to the original deck (or, in the case of TED talks, the source of the video). All decks are in the Cloze deletion format, so all that has to be done by the user is select words to cloze out. Because some of the videos don't have any English translations, while some don't even have English subtitles, I suggest using Imron's Chinese Text Analyzer to create English Definitions and pinyin entries for all the words you don't know. This will save a huge amount of time compared to doing it manually. In order to create a deck that is customized with all definitions and pinyin of words you don't know using CTA, please see this thread. Several tags have been added to all decks. The user can filter by: - Title - Type (movie/tv show/TED talk) - Simp/Trad subtitles - Whether the movie was originally made in Mandarin, Cantonese (although the audio will still be in Mandarin), or a foreign language (still, the audio will be in Mandarin). - Cards with English definitions (for the two decks that select definitions/pinyin were manually entered) Stats: As of Nov 18, 2016, 14,487 cards have been collected, consisting of a total of 96,800 words (9,772 unique words), and 3,295 unique characters. Master Decks All Decks - as of Nov 18, 2016 - this will import all decks into anki (21 decks), with each separate movie/TV show/TED talk having it's own deck Master Deck - as of Nov 18, 2016 - this will import all movies/TV shows/TED talks, but will do so into one master deck (users select which material to study using the filters listed above) Movies 20 Once Again (重返20岁) █ CN █ 1743 Notes █ Simp, Trad, Pinyin, Eng █ Made by Flickserve Book of Love/Finding Mr. Right 2 (北京遇上西雅图之不二情书).apkg █ CN █ 2179 Notes █ Simp, Trad, Pinyin, Eng █ Made by Flickserve Fearless █ CN █ 499 Notes █ Simp █ Made by HerrPetersen First Time (第一次) 2012 █ CN █ 938 Notes █ Simp, Trad, Pinyin, Eng █ Made by Flickserve Ip Man (葉問) █ CN █ 257 Notes █ Simp █ Made by HerrPetersen Love is not Blind (失恋33天) █ CN █ 1429 Notes █ Simp, Pinyin (select), Eng, Def (select) █ Made by Yadang My Geeky Nerdy Buddies (大宅男) █ CN █ 653 Notes █ Simp, Trad, Pinyin, Eng █ Made by Flickserve Ponyo (崖上的波妞/悬崖上的金鱼公主) █ 201 Notes █ Simp, Pinyin, Eng █ Made by Gleaves Saving Mr Wu/The Strongest Competitor (解救吾先生/最強對手) █ CN █ 1290 Notes █ Simp, Trad, Pinyin, Eng █ Made by Flickserve The Assassin (刺客聶隱娘) 2015 █ CN █ 261 Notes █ Simp, Trad, Pinyin, Eng █ Made by Flickserve The Incredibles (超人总动员) █ 901 Notes █ Simp, Trad, Pinyin, Eng █ Made by Flickserve Totoro (龙猫) █ 141 Notes █ Simp, Pinyin, Eng █ Made by Gleaves You Are the Apple of my Eye (那些年) █ CN █ 1346 Notes █ Trad, Pinyin (select), Eng, Def (select) █ Made by Yadang TV Shows FenDou (奋斗) ep 01 █ CN █ 658 Notes █ Simp █ Made by dtcamero My Best Ex-Boyfriend (最佳前男友) ep 01 █ CN █ 605 Notes █ Simp, Eng █ Made by Yadang My Sunshine (何以笙箫默) ep 01 █ CN █ 442 Notes █ Simp, Eng █ Made by Yadang The Lost Tomb/Grave Robbers' Chronicles/Daomu Biji (盗墓笔记) █ CN █ 416 Notes █ Simp, Eng █ Made by Yadang TED Talks 不完美的美 █ CN █ 278 Notes █ Trad, Eng █ Made by Yadang 不怕和世界不一樣 █ CN █ 248 Notes █ Trad, Eng █ Made by Yadang 學歷史的大用 █ CN █ 160 Notes █ Trad, Eng █ Made by Yadang 逆境中的軟哲學 █ CN █ 341 Notes █ Trad, Eng █ Made by Yadang Note: - “Select” means the definition has only been made for some cards. Otherwise, if listed, the simplified/traditional/pinyin is on all cards. - "CN" means the movie was originally created in Chinese (usually Mandarin, but Cantonese counts too - note even if the movie was made in Cantonese/other languages originally, all versions here are in Mandarin).
  47. 1 point
    That first bit. It's like you're a Communist Party agent deep in KMT territory, hunched over a Soviet made transistor radio as you try to scribble down instructions from your handlers.
  48. 1 point
    Hi everyone! It seems like the topic isn't really active at the moment, so not sure if it's the right place. I'm going to study at the Law department this Fall semester. I'm a bit nervous, since it's going to be my first time abroad and I don't know anybody else at Fudan, so I thought I'd check here and see if I could maybe virtually meet some other internationals beforehand (:
  49. 1 point
    Before taking the New HSK level 5 exam I searched all over looking for details about it that would help me prepare, especially after I found out that I would be taking the exam on the computer (网考). Though I did find the most helpful information on this website, it was difficult to find everything I wanted. This post is a summary of what I would have wanted to know before I took the test. First some background information. This was my first time to take an HSK exam. I took the exam in a smaller city in China on April 14, 2012. Before the exam I took 15 practice tests at home and also studied a few books about the HSK. General information The day before the exam there was a mock exam at the testing center to help those taking the exam get used to the computer based format. I found it very helpful to participate in this. You don't really need pencils and an eraser for the computer exam, but I brought them anyway and then asked for scratch paper before the exam, which they gave me. I used the scratch paper to mark difficult questions that I wanted to return to later. The computer format allows you jump instantly to any question (for the current portion of the exam) by clicking the question number on the list at the left of the screen. You can also easily change any answer as many times as you want. For each portion of the exam, the time counts down at the top of the screen, so you don't need to worry about not having a watch or a clock available. Listening The listening portion of the exam was very similar in difficulty to the practice exams available on the Hanban website. Some questions were so similar I almost felt like I had done them before. The four answer choices appear on the screen when the question number is spoken. You can only see the choices for the current question in part one. In part two, all of the answer choices are shown if there is more than one question for a particular dialog or passage. A blue progress bar at the top of the screen shows how much time you have left to answer the question. The screen automatically goes to the next answer set if you run out of time. Don't worry if you didn't have a chance to click your answer, though. There are 5 minutes at the end of the listening portion for you to go back. Just make a quick note of the question number on your scratch paper so that you can remember which one it was. Don't get distracted from listening to the beginning of the next dialog, though. One disadvantage of taking the exam on the computer is that you can't begin reading the answers to the next question if you finish one question early (except for passages with multiple questions). So I recommend when you are practicing with paper based exams beforehand that you refrain from looking at the next answer set until the woman says the number of the next dialog. I tried a lot of different strategies for the listening portion when I was preparing for the exam. Some worked well and some didn't. I recommend looking over the answers briefly before the listening passage begins. Try to determine what the question is going to be. That will give you a lot more focus when you are actually listening. If there is time before they start speaking then try to read at least one full answer. However, as soon as they start speaking, put your whole attention on what they are saying. You can still let your eyes rove over the answers, but your concentration has to be on what they are saying. I found that for short answer sets (2-4 characters) I could (and should) mark my answer or possible answer at the same time that the speakers were talking. If I didn't do this, it was easy to miss small but critical details. For longer answers I found that if I tried to read them at the same time, then I missed questions because I was concentrating too hard on reading. But if I focused on overall comprehension, I found that I usually had time to read and choose the correct answer after the question was asked. If you space off for even a moment you can miss a critical detail. I found two things that helped me to stay engaged in the dialog or passage. One was to use face and hand motions relating to the content of the passage to help me interact with what was being talked about. If you are too introverted to do that at the testing center (like me), then another one is to use your scratch paper to doodle about what is being talked about. Like I said, you have five minutes at the end of the listening section to go back and check/change your answers. I would use that whole time. Even though you can't replay the audio, you can reread your answers and make sure that you didn't misread them earlier or accidentally click the wrong one. Reading I found the reading portion to be a just little bit harder than I was expecting after doing the practice exams from the Hanban website. The reading portion is 45 minutes long. I mention that because some of the books I was using said it was 40 minutes while the Hanban site said 45 minutes. It's still not a bad idea to pace yourself to 40 minutes, though, and then use the extra five minutes to go back and check your answers to the difficult questions. For part one (fill in the blank), I think the best strategy is to look at the answers, then read the context before and after the blank. As long as you know the meaning of the words you can usually fill in the blank by only reading one or two sentences. For most of the questions you don't need to waist your time reading the whole passage. And believe me, you need every extra second you can get. For part two (short passage), I found the best strategy was to read the whole paragraph first as quickly as I could (just a little bit slower than skimming) while still maintaining some comprehension. My goal was to grasp the main idea but not necessarily every detail. Doing this I could often pick out the right answer or at least dismiss some wrong answers. Sometimes I had to return to the paragraph to look for details. Sometimes I had to just make my best guess and then make a note of the question number on my scratch paper and hope that I would have enough time at the end to come back and read it more carefully. For part three (long passage), the best strategy by far was to read the question first, note the key words, and then go back and scan the passage for the key words. After finding them, reading the context usually gave the correct answer. The questions were almost always asked in the same order as the passage content. Answers to questions about the main meaning of the passage can usually be found in the last sentence. Writing Here is where the main advantage of taking the computer exam is. I firmly believe that people should know how write characters by hand, but I admit that it was really nice to be able to use a pinyin input editor. This gave me a lot more time to compose my answers. It also allowed me to edit and rearrange after I was already done with my draft. That wasn't possible when I practiced writing on paper. I recommend that you use a computer when practicing this portion (but only if your exam is going to be computer based, of course). There were a large number of Chinese input editor choices on the computer I used. I chose the Sohu editor. If you can't remember how to write a character but you know the pinyin, then write a longer word or even a whole phrase and the right characters are usually automatically displayed. Some difficult punctuation marks to make are (、) the backslash key, (·) the tilde key, and (……) Shift+6. For part one, you just drag and drop the sentence fragments into the correct order. As long as you know the grammar, it is fast and painless. For part two, question one (80-word essay using the five given words), the best advice I found was to form a sentence linking all five words logically. Then expand each part of the sentence by adding descriptions, linking grammar, and so on. For part two, question two (80-word essay about a picture), the most basic good advice I was given was to first write a simple sentence describing the main point of the picture. Then expand that sentence by adding details, background, ideas, and so on. Preparation Tips For long term preparation, I recommend reading extensively in Chinese on many different topics. Specific topics that may be extra helpful are Chinese culture, famous history stories and legends, stories behind proverbs, and modern social concerns like population, pollution, and environmental protection. For listening, I recommend watching Chinese TV or serial dramas, clips on Youku, and listening to the radio. I liked the serial drama 《租个女友回家过年》 for both its interesting storyline and its culturally content. Or just check what modern TV dramas have high popularity rankings on Youku, Xunlei, or whatever your favorite site is. Keeping a topical daily Chinese diary would also be a good practice. I really, really recommend the Anki app for practicing vocabulary. If my Android phone did nothing other than Anki, it still would have been worth the price I paid for the phone. The app for Android is free and whatever it costs for Apple phones I'm sure it's worth it. I downloaded the 5000-word HSK level 6 list for Anki and after learning that, there were very few words I didn't know in the entire HSK 5 exam (which only supposedly requires 2500 words). I also memorized some flowery language and proverbs to describe a variety of situations. It paid off in the writing section. For short term practice, I recommend the following books: 新HSK考试辅导教程(5级) from 高等教育出版社 It has some good advice and also lots of good practice, including writing samples. 21天征服新HSK六级写作 Yes, this is for level 6 writing, but the whole first unit is about level 5 and that alone was worth the price of the book. Very well written. Besides, I can still use it if I take level 6 some day. Then a book with extra practice exams is helpful, too. I used 新HSK模拟试题集·五级 by Sinolingua. Their mock tests were significantly harder than the actual tests, but that has its benefits, too. These books and more are all readily available on Amazon.cn if you are in China. Well, this is a long post, but I wish someone else had written it before I took the exam. I hope you may find it helpful yourself.
  50. 1 point
    Hi there! I wanted to ask about scholarships, but I´ve found the info in other threads and here nobody replied /of course, there are the other threads/. I hope somebody can delete this, thanks!
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