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    LuDaibola

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Showing most liked content since 04/20/2018 in all areas

  1. 8 points
    Ok, here goes. You get good at the things that you practice (assuming correct practice). If you want to get good at a specific skill it's more effective if you practice that skill rather than practicing other skills that may or may not have overlap with the skill you're trying to learn, because by practicing the skill you'll find out where your flaws are and have concrete feedback on what to fix. It might be more painful to practice that thing - especially if practicing it constantly exposes just how bad you are at it, but if you don't practice the specific skill you'll end up practicing things that don't address the problem at hand and you'll never see much improvement. For example, you say you have the vocabulary needed to understand most of what you are listening to, you just can't process it in time. This indicates that any activity that focuses on increasing vocab rather than increasing your processing speed of that vocab is not going to be very useful. You could double your vocabulary but if you haven't increased your processing speed it will all be for naught and you'll still only be understanding ~20% of what you hear. This is why you should train what you want to learn. On to the specifics of what I think is the problem at hand. When you are trying to listen to something, you need to devote a certain amount of brainpower to the following things: 1. processing sounds 2. mapping the sound to a syllable 3. mapping the syllables to a words - drawing from knowledge of vocabulary, speech patterns and current context/topic 4. identifying word boundaries and readjusting from 3 (or even 2) if necessary 5. processing the meaning of those words when appearing in sequence together. If that process is too slow then by the time you reach point 5, the original speaker has moved on and you have either keep going with point 5 to understand one small fragment (at the expense of missing steps 1-4 for the next few fragments) or restart the process 1-5 for what is currently being said and abandoning point 5 for what was previously said. It's a vicious cycle where interruptions at any point affect your ability to understand, which leads to increased interruptions for later parts of the speech. Yes there is! The fix is to speed up steps 1-4, so that the bulk of your brainpower can be spent on step 5. The best way to speed up steps 1-4 is drilling and repetition, drilling and repetition and then more drilling and repetition (more on the exact steps in just a bit). In recent years, rote drilling and repetition have fallen out of popularity in language learning circles in favour of 'smart' methods, and I used to feel the same way about it until I started doing it and had good results from it. The reason is that drilling things repeatedly makes whatever you are drilling an automatic reflex, and once it's an automatic reflex you don't need to spend much brainpower on it - it just comes automatically. If you drill 100% listening comprehension of phrases spoken at regular speed, building up to sentences and then paragraphs you'll make steps 1-4 automatic, and you'll be able to devote most of your brainpower to understanding the semantics of what is being said rather than spending a large amount of effort on processing the sounds and splitting them into words. As for specifics, this post provides specific steps for how to drill listening (it's what got me first started on drilling). Make sure to read the follow up posts later in the thread by the same author. I've also written up my own thoughts in a post here. Note, those posts are years old now and the resources listed in them no longer exist. See this thread on potential replacements for 锵锵三人行. Once you've found a good source of material, you then just need to drill your listening every day for a sustained period of time (from my own experience, it'll take a minimum of 1 month of daily drilling to see initial results, and 3 months to notice clear improvements). It's also better to do a little bit every day, than longer amounts every other day (or every few days). The above method for drilling listening will bore you to tears, but it will return dividends if you keep at it.
  2. 4 points
    http://www.blcup.com/ResDown/index/9074 http://www.blcup.com/ResDown/index/9504 @Fróði Gregersen Edit: I was bored. 1 textbook 《HSK标准教程 1》课本相关练习参考答案 1 workbook 《HSK标准教程练习册1》听力文本及参考答案 2 textbook 《HSK标准教程 2》课本相关练习参考答案 2 workbook 《HSK标准教程练习册2》听力文本及参考答案 3 textbook 《HSK标准教程 3》课本相关练习参考答案 3 workbook 《HSK标准教程练习册3》听力文本及参考答案 4 A textbook 《HSK标准教程 4上》课本相关练习参考答案 4 A workbook 《HSK标准教程练习册4上》听力文本及参考答案 4 B textbook 《HSK标准教程 4下》课本相关练习参考答案 4 B workbook 《HSK标准教程练习册4下》听力文本及参考答案 5 A textbook 《HSK标准教程 5上》课本相关练习参考答案 5 A workbook HSK标准教程(5上)练习册-录音文本及答案 5 B textbook 《HSK标准教程 5下》课本相关练习参考答案 5 B workbook HSK标准教程(5下)练习册-录音文本及答案 6 A textbook 《HSK标准教程 6上》课本相关练习参考答案 6 A workbook HSK标准教程(6上)练习册-录音文本及答案 6 B textbook 《HSK标准教程 6下》课本相关练习参考答案 6 B workbook HSK标准教程(6下)练习册-录音文本及答案
  3. 4 points
    Anyone who was waiting for an edited version, I've just uploaded it. It will be available within 72 hours. Hope it's readable now.
  4. 4 points
    I went to a working lunch a couple weeks ago at a respected restaurant in an exclusive conference center out near Dian Lake. It was sponsored by a hospital group with which I'm consulting part time. About a dozen people were present and it didn't take long for the conversation to shift to the always-interesting topic of "Spring Food." China eats by seasons as well as by regions. Most of you probably knew that. But it's not just a little bit; it's fairly extreme. Some of this is simply dictated by what's available when, but lots is also dictated by what is considered beneficial for health as the body is going through this particular stage of its annual changes. What promotes qi when emerging from winter, for example, and what helps maintain the proper balance between wet and dry, internal heat and internal cold? Such subjects are not considered esoteric here, and are things every boy or girl grows up understanding while still at grandmother's knee. The consensus of our group of knowledgeable locals was that the absolute glory of this time of year is wild vegetables. Things that don't thrive in cultivation and must be harvested by hand up on the side of the mountain. Under their guidance, we ordered several such items and my curiosity was piqued about several more. Here's a quick look into that world: the wild spring vegetable world. Remember -- You can click the photos to enlarge them. Many wild vegetables are served with eggs. The dish above left is one of those. The small golden flowers are called 金花,logically enough, and are cooked tender and moist with their supporting green tips, resulting in a thin griddle cake, or 煎饼 of the type we have encountered before. What makes them great is that their taste is so fresh, so pleasant, so mild. The eggs let them shine. The bamboo shoots on the above right are a special kind found only in spring. Their distinguishing characteristic is that they are ever so slightly sweet. Being tender, all they require is a quick stir fry, here presented with red and green peppers. I often make them at home. The lady at my neighborhood wet market, above, peels the tough outer leaves after weighing your purchase. Easy to fix, they are one of my "go to" meals at this time of year. One can also buy baby bamboo shoots, already peeled, that are usually sold as 春笋, sometimes a 竹呀 (bamboo sprouts.) I like these too and have posted recipes for them here in the past. Our meal included a spicy, vinegary salad with an unusual earthy kick. It was made from the leaves of a root vegetable that's popular in Yunnan, namely the 折耳根。It has no translation, pronounced "zhe er gen" and I'd be surprised if it's found in the west. It's not even popular in other distant parts of China. The roots are like "underground vines" and can be found year round here, but the leaves are at their best now. I bought some at the market this morning, shown above right. Plan to prepare them tonight. They served a large basin of small fish that were freshly caught an hour before in the nearby lake that we could see from the window. They were served in a spicy sauce, one to each diner, and were considered a special spring treat because each fish was filled with roe. The roe had been cooked in place. Interesting flavor and texture. I had not had it before. The lunch featured lots of vegetables, emphasizing what was best right then, going light on meat. These pictured above right are related to asparagus. Lightly steamed and served with a sauce, ready to be mixed at the table. The sauce had fire and a bite. Yunnan does love its spices. The lunch left an impression and I've been trying to make a lot of the same things to enjoy at home. When I went to the wet market this morning, I was bowled over by a huge assortment of edible flowers and edible ferns. Some I've made at home in years past, but others are still a mystery. Those give me something to which to look forward in days to come. Lady above left, in ethnic garb, has 3 or 4 kinds of flowers displayed as well as lots of young okra, popular here just now as 黄蜀葵。It's usually fried. The fiddlehead ferns on the right are sold as 蕨菜。 Often they are made with eggs. I bought a bunch of the fresh, crimson tipped 香椿 (aka "Chinese toon") pictured here to the left, and plan to make it tomorrow. They require a little knack, and if not done right can taste too strong to be pleasant. It's actually the young tip of a tree branch, the tree from the mahogany family, and it occupies an interesting niche partway between delicacy and survival fare. But I've made them in past springs and enjoyed them. Pretty sure I've posted some recipes here. Will go back and check later. I bought three of these small tropical pineapples for 10 Yuan. Some are brought up from Vietnam, but I understood her to say these were from Xishuangbanna, in the deep south of Yunnan. The seller will cut them into bite sized pieces, but I usually do that at home one at a time so they keep longer. I passed on the cherries this morning, though I bought some last week. Tasty. These are the small tart Yunnan cherries that become available in the middle of March every year. You recall that our cherry trees bloom in February, much earlier than those revered in the Cherry Blossom Festivals of Japan. No trip to the market would be complete without stopping off at the food stalls for a nice hot bowl of something or other local and delicious. Today I opted for won ton in a spicy red sauce 红汤馄饨 。Sometimes instead I have a bowl of 豆花米线,rice noodles with soft tofu "flowers," equally good for a Saturday snack. Both can be made at home, of course, but they are 6 or 8 Yuan very well spent in my estimation, just to avoid all the fuss and give the morning a "holiday" feel.
  5. 4 points
    普济 is a (fictional?) place name. 普济 and 这地方 are in apposition, i.e. they refer to the same entity, "This place Puji...." 搭子 was originally a mahjong term. It means a set of three tiles (chow) of the same suit and in sequence, or two tiles with the potential to form a chow. It's then used metaphorically to refer to partners in an activity. So 老搭子 here means regular mahjong buddies. 两文钱 is easy to understand, right? 两 is not an exact number. It's just some money. 棺材钱 further describes the intended use of that money -- it's the money she's been saving up for her own funeral, it's her "coffin" money (as a figure of speech).
  6. 4 points
    OK, update for those interested: I had my 15-minute video (Skype) interview yesterday. I thought it would be with an officer from the Confucius Institute, but unexpectedly, it was actually a chat with my first preference supervisor, which is good because we had met before. The questions he asked were: 1) self-intro 2) what I want to research 3) how's your Classical Chinese? I didn't feel I performed that well, so I emailed my supervisor last night to clarify a few things. He said he supports me, but it will be up to the Confucius Institute whether I get in or not. Keep your fingers crossed for me! We will get official announcements in June, but I hope I can get an early response as if I have to leave my teaching post at BISU they will need to time to find a replacement.
  7. 3 points
    Hi there, I was wondering if anyone owned the Xiaomi Air monitor (here)? If so, how have you found it? I read this review of Xiaomi's air purifiers and they're saying that the monitor inbuilt into the xiaomi purifiers is essentially useless. If that's the case, won't their stand alone device use the same tech? I'm debating buying the xiaomi model or the laser egg. The xiaomi is cheaper and I already have a fair amount of xiaomi stuff in my house so it would mean using the same app/ecosystem. I did read somewhere that the stand alone monitor uses “laser” tech (the same as the “laser” egg I assume). Be good to find someone who actually has the Xiaomi one Thanks!
  8. 3 points
    For those of us who don't have -- and will never have -- Facebook accounts, are we nonetheless being tracked around the web by Facebook because Facebook has a linked log-in here, and on other sites we visit? What information if any is Facebook given about users here? (The privacy policy only mentions "advertisers" here putting cookies on our machines.)
  9. 3 points
    Spring has finally arrived here in Pennsylvania so my drive through the countryside to my appointment was a treat for my eyes..this is such a beautiful state. At any rate, I did ask my orthodontist what he thought about your situation and he said that, although this varies from individual to individual, after 9 months your bones have probably hardened enough so that going without the retainer for up to 3 months even would not present too much of a problem. So, really, it looks like you may have some time to figure out what you want to do. It's so nice that so many forum members have had experience with dentists in China even to the point of suggesting specific practices. I can only imagine how hard this is for you on top of all of the other adjustments you must be making to living in a different culture and being so far away from home. Hope someone found the retainer and handed it in the lost and found. Best of luck with this.
  10. 3 points
    It's not Korean 炒码面?
  11. 3 points
    空調 is short for 空氣調節(器). 空 stands for 空氣. You pronounce 空 the same way you pronounce 空氣, which is kong1qi4. You can easily find the pronunciation in authoritative dictionaries from both sides of the strait: 《现代汉语词典》http://www.guoxuedashi.com/kangxi/pic.php?f=xdhycd&p=742 《教育部重編國語辭典》http://dict.revised.moe.edu.tw/cgi-bin/cbdic/gsweb.cgi?o=dcbdic&searchid=Z00000078791 Machine translation is not a mature technology and it won't be any time soon. Google Translate is not a reliable source. Not for translation. Not for pronunciation. Period.
  12. 3 points
    Hi guys. Anyone applying for the Ph.D. in China Fellowship (来华攻读博士学位项目)? It's an excellent scholarship which basically covers everything during your studying a doctorate in China, including: • Lodging and living stipend: 80,000 RMB per year; • Research fund: 20,000 RMB per year • Round-trip international airfare; • Tuition; • Other support provided by the host Chinese university; • Expenses for life and medical insurances in China. • Group activities and cultural experience. (more info here) I have submitted all my paperwork and have my video interview this afternoon via Skype (a very short one, at just 15 minutes...). Anyone else in the same boat? I can also provide updates on the process as it unfolds, and answer any questions anyone might have. My situation: I have applied to do my doctorate in ancient Chinese literary translation at PKU (first preference) and Fudan (second preference). Anyone studying a postgrad program at PKU or Fudan who wants to connect feel free to say hi. Carl
  13. 3 points
    FWIW, we also sell these as Pleco add-ons with no Pinyin. (though of course you can tap on words to look up the Pinyin) (we are working on some other titles, and would love to sell Mandarin Companion too, but haven't yet come up with mutually satisfactory business terms) (though I do have some methodological disagreements with that paper)
  14. 2 points
    My kids are the ultimate ice breaker! Some people will see that I'm a foreigner and so just mutter 好可爱啊 on their way past, but then I always laugh and it sparks a conversation. The other common question is whether or not they are twins. I've also had a few times when people openly stare, especially old people. I found it quite disconcerting at first, but then I realized that if I look at them and smile they tend to come over and start chatting. So, if you want the best ice breaker, and are willing to commit to even more than a dog, have kids in China hah!
  15. 2 points
    Chinese: A Comprehensive Grammar Chapter 4 Adjectives as attributives and predicatives tl;dr: Chinese syntax has semantic, pragmatic, and prosodic constraints.
  16. 2 points
    Wow...synchronicity. My daughter just sent me a link to a post on her cousin's Tumblr blog that you might find interesting as it's on this topic (with some helpful references at the end): https://tinyurl.com/ycyd8vp9 What struck me was the fact that as I was reading it, I confess, I was saying to myself, "Aw, I'm so sorry that Molly had these things happen to her" but another part of me was saying "wow, she needs to toughen up, I mean what woman hasn't been catcalled." But then I got to the sentence where she wrote, "Because the problem wasn’t where or when or how I ran, the problem was those who were harassing me." I felt ashamed (appropriately) that I had downplayed her experiences and never seriously thought about this issue before. I moved to NYC when I was 28 and lived there until I was 42; getting catcalled was so common that it just became background noise for me. But in New York, there were almost always lots of other people around, so I never truly felt threatened. And Molly was talking about experiences that, often, happened to her when she was alone and in a different country (as you are). So…thank you for sharing your experience here as it’s given me an incentive to think about the problem of street harassment and to begin to see it for what it is…an unwanted boundary violation that can be terribly upsetting and unfairly put victims in the position of needing to change their own behavior in order to avoid further occurrences. (It’s also more grist for the mill for me as, in the last third of my life, I continue to unravel the influence of my upbringing and life experiences on my current psyche. (In this instance, for example, I see that my intense desire, as a child, to do whatever I could to minimize conflict influenced my lifelong acceptance of this inappropriate behavior.))
  17. 2 points
    Of course I'm not suggesting you stay in your apartment. I am saying that when you're overseas -- any country overseas -- you are well-advised to step back and move on, avoiding any conflicts with local residents. It doesn't matter who's right or who's wrong. Shrug it off.
  18. 2 points
    In Guiyang, I would say unless you can find a better recommendation from expats, you can just go to the Guiyang Stomatology Hospital aka “Guiyang Hospital of Stomatological” (貴陽口腔醫院) where they basically do every tooth thing that you can think of. Including invisalign, according to a post one of their dentists made a couple years ago online. This option would require you to find someone with good English AND good Chinese to go with you. You might be able to pay a translator but you’ll probably feel more comfortable if it’s someone you know.
  19. 2 points
    I think nouns are more likely to have a light tone on the second character than verbs and modifiers. But that's just an impression. In any event, if you've got Wenlin or the ABC dictionary you should be able to whip up a list in a jiffy. Not more than a couple hours, three at most.
  20. 2 points
    Where are you located? My dentist is part of the Arrail chain, and they are pretty up-to-date with modern dentistry, and even offer Invisalign. They should be able to assist with retainers. I know that they have clinics in the larger cities in China. Is there one near you? Here's a link to their website: http://www.arrail-dental.com/en/index.html Check to see if your insurance covers them. Mine does.
  21. 2 points
    It might save a lot of speculation if the OP could tell us what s/he wanted the tattoo to say before it was "translated".
  22. 2 points
    What's worked for me in this regard is using Audacity to record myself saying my own sentences with the best tonal quality possible and then listening to these sentences just as I do with sentences spoken by a native speaker (sentences from Glossika, Archchinese, ChinesePod, and other sources). With Audacity, you can record sections separately - say 4 words at a time - and then combine them into a complete sentence. You can also speak the entire sentence in one stream with gaps between phrases while you think about how to say the next phrase and then just delete the gaps to make it sound like one fluent sentence. You can also use the program to speed up the sentence. The only drawback to this method is that, without help from a native speaker, you can get the tones write but totally screw up the prosody. For this reason, I primarily restrict myself to substitution sentences; 也就是說,I take a sentence from one of the aforementioned native speaker sources and fill-in different words retaining the rhythm and stress as closely as possible. If you're not already using it, Audacity is free and easy to use at a basic level (believe me, I'm practically a Luddite). Hope this is helpful.
  23. 2 points
    剛勝兵 op looking for a translation. It feels very 'english' if you ask me: its either meant to say 'recently victorious army/soldier' or 'strong, victorious army/soldier' 勝兵 is a coined word used in 孫子兵法, and 剛 appears to be tacked on for the meaning '剛性‘ or perhaps some kind of ’金剛’ connotation ('hard metal', 'buddhist warrior deity' etc.) That being said, 剛 is used in oral to stand for 'recently occurred'. context is key here
  24. 2 points
    They verify both. Their staff usually check online application and they will tell you to correct it and upload missing documents once they have done. Regarding physical copies, DO NOT forget to send all the necessary documents (for online application it's fine since they will tell you to update it and it can be done easily) but if you forget any physical document then you will need to send them again and it's hassle to send just a few missing documents where you won't be even sure whether they'll put it with your half file or not so always better to send full copies or if they ask any missing documents and they want you to send it again then send complete copy again just to be sure. Usually, it depends on the university though, Many universities (A, B tire) are known for their good reputation usually wouldn't make such mistakes but some universities might be just plain lazy (in the end, its up-to-the staff and sometimes they are prone to errors). From, my knowledge what I can assume is that your application has passed the initial review which is documents check probably. It's not rejected yet. If it's rejected they would have written it and regarding the status change. They don't do it very often. Sometimes it will take up to 2-3 weeks to change the status. I have personally asked ZJU and they have said they don't do the system update that often. Yes, They won't respond to emails that quick. Depends upon the university, some are quick, some don't even read. If you have any doubts, better call them on landline number. Thank-you Angelina. Yes, I also have heard ZJU being very strict. You're right, something is better than nothing. And, It's very sad to hear that you're not applying this year. We hope that you still visit the forum on your free time. Thank-you for your contributions to the CSC forum. Wish you all the best with your future projects.
  25. 2 points
    选民 xuǎnmín not only means 'electorate' or 'the people who voted for you', but also 'the chosen people'. I encountered this in a Christian text and it made so much more sense once I'd found the other meaning.
  26. 2 points
    Looks like gang1 sheng4 bing1 in traditional characters. Could be a name. If not then I have no idea as it doesn't appear in my dictionary as anything other than the individual characters.
  27. 2 points
    In terms of grammar, there are a few changes I would recommend: - remove 似的 - change 名吃 to 名菜 - change 鱼在啤酒里煮了 to 用啤酒煮的鱼 - change 最名 to 最有名 - change 还有,米粉很一道便宜的菜 to 还有,米粉是一道很便宜的菜 to make it grammatically correct. However, simply saying 而且很便宜 would be better in my opinion. I also suspect that the word 菜 can't or at least shouldn't be applied to a dish of plain noodles or rice, but I'm not sure. Perhaps someone else can confirm. - this part 还有,白果跟鸭一起煮为了做这个名汤 also needs some attention but I'm not 100% sure what you want to say. Is it "also, baiguo is cooked with duck to make this famous soup"?
  28. 2 points
    I think you got a bit mixed up but your second post adequately clarifies what I think is sound advice. I don't think anyone is suggesting that you learn tones from whole sentences. Most of this kind of advice is aimed at what you should not do, namely, focusing on learning characters and tones in isolation and then learning words and sentences in isolation. This leads to very unnatural speech in which tones are either over-emphasised or completely neglected. By practising sentences with your attention on tones, tone sandhi and intonation, you can achieve a more natural/native sounding speech than you otherwise would.
  29. 2 points
    1. I don't think nephew is the right term. 從兄(=堂兄) is an older male paternal cousin sharing the same family name. Depending on whether they share a grandfather or great-grandfather or great-great-grandfather, this person is either Empress Dou's father's brother's son (first cousin) or Empress Dou's father's father's son's son (second cousin) or Empress Dou's father's father's father's son's son's son (third cousin). I think it's safe to say he is Empress Dou's cousin from the male line of the Dou family. And Dou Ying is his son. Chinese kinship terms are more granular, so to speak, than English, with a focus on the male lineage. Because China is a patriarchal society and family name is a big deal. The emperor's family name is Liu. The relatives on his side are 漢室宗親. The empress's family name is Dou. The relatives on her side are 外戚. Big difference. Unlike the Liu House, their fate is tied to a particular woman. Emperors die and an emperor has many wives. 2. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Retainers_in_early_China_(social_group) 3. Yes. 4. 朝 = 朝見天子 to have an audience with the emperor. There's a group of words with practically the same meaning, e.g. 春見曰朝,夏見曰宗,秋見曰覲,冬見曰遇…… according to 《周禮》. 5. No idea. 6. Your translation is good. 門籍 are bamboo strips used to keep track of who has the security clearance. 7. Same event, different name: https://zh.wikipedia.org/zh-hant/七国之乱 8. Obviously the emperor wants Dou Ying to lead the forces against the rebels. 9. 王孫 is a general term for the offspring of a royal family or nobility. Here of course the emperor is referring to Dou Ying by his status. 寧 = 豈、難道. 讓 = 推辭 to decline. And yes it's a rhetorical question: 'How can you decline?' 10. He had already accepted the appointment when he recommended two other men to the emperor. He didn't take the gold himself, but gave all the gold away to his subordinates. P.S. 梁孝王朝,因昆弟燕飲。 I think this 因 is an adverb that means 於是. And 歸 = 歸附 to submit to.
  30. 2 points
    I haven't heard of any friend of mine who's gone through a similar situation to yours, so please take my opinion with as much salt as you can find. This is nothing more than a viewpoint. Compared to a certificate, the screenshot on the face of it shouldn't stand up as evidence because it's something that can be easily forged. That said, if the screenshot contains identifying/reference numbers that Hanban (et al) can use to look up your scores - such as your test number ID - then it might stand a chance. Given how poor Hanban can be at sending out certificates, I can't imagine you're the first person to run into this problem. I'd advise erring on the side of caution and waiting for a certificate if you can regardless (I don't want to promote anything reckless here), but that's my thoughts on it.
  31. 2 points
    This is what I’m imagining...
  32. 2 points
    i think though the inclusion of Mandarin companion series is not as necessary as the Graded Chinese Readers series, as Mandarin Companion provide an ebook type format. It is nice to use and has some graphics doted around the place. Its very easy to use PLECO screen reader service at the same time. Including it as a PLECO add-on would make it more integrated I admit, although if one is checking more than a few words per page the level is too high. Finally I think using ebooks or graded readers, whether PLECO or not a tablet is a lot easier to use. Looking at a phone for any period of time becomes quite tedious in my experience. Mike, i assume if one has PLECO they can install the app on a tablet without needing to pay again, is that correct?
  33. 2 points
    The link in his signature is to his website which has some background information. Good luck OP!
  34. 2 points
    If it only asked for "countries," then maybe listing "Taiwan" would raise hackles of the super-sensitive. But since it apparently asks for "countries or territories," then "Taiwan" would seem safe. Note this problem arises all the time in the Mainland, and a convention seems to have been worked out. For example, in airports you'll see signs pointing to "International and Regional Departures." Sometimes you'll see the term "cross-border" referring to travel to HK, Macau and Taiwan. "Taiwan Region" would certainly be safe. Just don't include "R.O.C." in there anywhere. Oh, when and you're in the Mainland, don't get cute at the post office and try to send something to Taipei at domestic rates.
  35. 2 points
  36. 2 points
    Just follow Benny Lewis' 3-month course on how to water down your claims.
  37. 2 points
    Ben, I think you would benefit from using the circling method. This is talked about in TPRS. I use this method quite a bit when I was teaching English in China, and I also used it on myself for improving my fluency in Chinese. Basically, you take a sentence and then ask and answer every question that you can about it. For example: 毛泽东每天晚上在宾馆里睡觉八个小时。 Ideally this would come from a textbook and you would have the audio clip for it. Listen to the audio clip over and over repeating out loud until you can say the sentence fluently and accurately. The next step is to create questions based on the sentence, for example: 谁每天晚上在宾馆里睡觉八个小时? 毛泽东什么时候在宾馆里睡觉八个小时? 毛泽东每天晚上在哪儿睡觉八个小时? 毛泽东每天晚上在宾馆里做什么? 毛泽东每天晚上在宾馆里睡觉几个小时? The questions above are using who, what, where, when, how much, etc. Now, you can make some fun ones, such as: (Note, these are yes/no questions) obama每天晚上在宾馆里睡觉八个小时吗? 毛泽东每星期六在宾馆里睡觉八个小时吗? Then, you ask yourself the questions and answer them in full sentences, in the following way: obama每天晚上在宾馆里睡觉八个小时吗? 不。obama不每天晚上在宾馆里睡觉八个小时吗。 obama每天晚上在宾馆里睡觉八个小时。 Once you have created as many questions as you can and their answers, start asking and answering the questions out loud. This is a fantastic exercise for developing oral fluency in building your confidence. If you can find a study partner to do this with it can go a lot easier and even be quite funny and enjoyable. Anyway, I don't think it would feel like going back to the beginning if you are to take the 500 characters and vocabularies that you have learned and drill yourself in this way. Then, once you build up some fluency, that is once your speaking catches up with your reading, then you can start learning new material again. Good luck!
  38. 1 point
    Should think they would need to register as staying with you at the local police station to comply with regulations, though that's always been pretty straightforward in my experience.
  39. 1 point
    Pianote, I just had an idea. There's a forum for Taiwan expats called forumosa.com and I know that some women there created their own separate forum. I'm not a member but I'm sure that they discuss issues such as the one you're facing and, while Taiwan in not China, maybe their thoughts/support would be helpful. Or, perhaps, someone knows of a similar forum for women living in China. The url for the forumosa women's forum is: http://tw.forumosa.com/c/women
  40. 1 point
    If it all goes well, perhaps you can review the dentist’s office experience you got there! If not, well you could still do the same
  41. 1 point
    If you encounter hostility in China, retreat. That's just part and parcel of being a foreigner, anywhere. Always keep a low profile. (And don't even think about Mace!)
  42. 1 point
    Well, you may or may not be a jerk, but there are plenty of perfectly nice people who get stupid Chinese tattoos, so that fact alone is not a final judgement of your character. Your tattoo says 露万家族 lù wàn jiāzú. 家族 means 'family, clan'. I don't know what to make of 露万. 露 means 'dew' or 'to show, to reveal' (and is also my name), 万 means 'ten thousand'. Does your surname sound like 'Luwan', by any chance? The calligraphy is not bad at all. I find the 万 a bit ugly, but that might just be my taste. The characters are clearly not tattooed by a native speaker, but still came out quite well.
  43. 1 point
    @LuDaibola I should clarify. I meant that my insurance covers dental care with this (quite expensive) dental chain. I have not gotten orthodontics with them, and pretty sure that it isn't covered. I do know that they do invisalign and that they do have orthodontists on staff. @Pianote If you are able to find a good orthodontist in Guiyang, I don't see why you need to travel so far to get fitted for orthodontics. I could only recommend what I know, and what I know is the dental care I have personally experienced in China! Perhaps ask around the expats in Guiyang and see who they use for dentists and/or orthodontists. If nobody's used an orthodontist, just go see a dentist and get a referral. Good dentists tend to recommend good orthodontists.
  44. 1 point
    I assume there are dentists in China who can replace them. I think for you, the best option is to go to a dentist in an international hospital. They are a lot more expensive than Chinese hospitals, but I think you'll be a lot more at ease. Perhaps call ahead to ask if they can make retainers for you. Also contact your dentist at home to ask if they can help. I don't know much about retainers, but perhaps if your dentist knows your teeth and still has the necessary information, they can make new retainers for you and ship them to you? Or at least your dentist can send you (or your Chinese dentist) the information they have about your teeth and the treatment plan they had in mind with the retainers. Alternatively, go without retainers until you are back in your home country and can get new ones. Depending on what you needed the retainers for and what the consequences would be if you don't wear them, this is probably the easiest and cheapest option. But perhaps contact your dentist at home first, to ask their opinion. This is one of those unfortunate instances of bad luck that is a lot more complicated to resolve than it would be back home. Good luck, I'm sure things will be alright in the end.
  45. 1 point
    My translation is below. I seem to have underestimated in the same way as you, somethingfunny. This is the first time I've ever actually written out a translation in English. One line of literary Chinese comes out to more than three lines of English! I now really appreciate the brevity and pith of 古文. I've marked out a few points where I think our understandings of the text differ. ------ Dou Ying, the Lord of Weiji, was the son of the cousin of Dowager Empress Dou (孝文后從兄子). His father’s line had for generations been people of Guanji, and their retainers were pleased to be in their service (喜賓客). In Emperor Han Xiao Wen (Liu Heng)’s time, Dou Ying had been the minister of Wu, though he withdrew from the position due to illness. When Emperor Han Jing first ascended the throne, he served as Overseer of Affairs. King Xiao of Liang (Liu Wu) was the younger brother of Emperor Han Xiao Jing (Liu Qi). His mother, Dowager Empress Dou loved (and favored) him, so he came to court, and feasted and drank (with the emperor and others) as a brother-and-brother (not as a ruler-and-subject). At the time, Emperor Xiao Jing had not yet established a successor, and amidst the merriment of the feast(酒酣), he blithely said, “After my thousand autumns, I will pass (the throne) to you, King Liang.” Dowager Dou was pleased. (However,) Dou Ying took his cup of wine, raised it, and said, “The realm is the realm of Emperor Han Gaozu (’s making). The son succeeds the father; this is the rule of Han. How then can His Majesty pass the throne to King Liang (his brother)?” Dowager Dou despised him for this. (Later,) Dou Ying, who had disdained his office, stepped down claiming illness. Dowager Dou revoked his permit/clearance, which made him unable to have audiences with the emperor. In the third year of Xiao Jing’s reign, Wu and Chu rebelled. The emperor understood (察) that none of his kin nor any those of the Dou clan were as sagacious as Dou Ying, and so he summoned him. Dou Ying entered and appeared before the emperor, but resolutely refused his request, claiming that illness had made him unsuitable. Dowager Dou felt ashamed at this (knowing she was partly to blame for Dou Ying’s refusal). Then, the emperor said, “The realm is now facing an emergency! How can a relative of the throne demur (at at time like this)!?” Thereupon, he appointed Dou Ying commander in chief of his armies, and gifted him 1000 jin of gold. Dou YIng spoke of Yuan Ang, Luan Bu and other such commanders and wise men of note who were at home, and recommended them (for the emperor’s service). The gold given by the emperor was arrayed under a portico. Functionaries from the military came, and (Dou Ying) frequently ordered them to weigh out and take some of it to be used for expenses. None of the gold was taken home (for private gain). Dou Ying stood in control over Xingyang and supervised the armies of Qi and Zhao, (which had rebelled with Wu and Chu but had been brought to battle and surrendered.) After the armies of all seven rebel countries had been completely defeated, Dou Ying was enfeoffed as Lord of Weiji, and many wandering knights and (discharged) retainers vied to cleave to him and take up his service. During Xiao Jing’s reign, whenever the court was assembled and great matters were discussed, no one dared to treat Lord Tiao (Zhou Yafu) or Lord Weiji as a mere equal.
  46. 1 point
    Most Chinese I've met are acutely aware of the political situation of Taiwan, or at least of the PRC point of view on this situation. Anyone who has had a secondary school education will have had it drilled into them that Taiwan is an inalienable part of China etc etc. Anyone working in a visa office will likely know and care a little bit more than the average Zhou. That said, I think it's unlikely that you will have any hassle even if you did write ROC. My estimate is that China still has bigger fish to fry than a tourist who didn't think about all the intricacies surrounding their earlier trip. (Big hotel chains and airlines are bigger fish.)
  47. 1 point
    Thank you Shelley ! I hope I will soon get used to using it! Meanwhile I’m reading as many treads and pages about 的 as possible!
  48. 1 point
    Hi @pan.kasper The different types of scholarships listed are available on http://cis.chinese.cn/ 1)There is no indication that you have to be a classroom student for the scholarship you are interested in, it does say that you need to maintain contact with your recommending CI. I think some will be happy to recommend you based on you doing exam there. But perhaps other peoples experiences are different if they go to CI that has a lot of students which they would prefer to prioritise for recommendations. Some CI have strong connections to a university in China and so prefer to make use of this connection for people who study with them. 2) the application deadlines are listed on the website under proceedures. (June 20th for Sept intake). 3) Tsinghua is not on the list of hosting institutions this year. I can only agree with you presumption about more famous universities being more competitive, but you would need to think about what works best for you if you want to have a good experience, some people prefer to study in less popular places to improve their opportunities chance of language acquisition, other people who have no exposure to China are not so confident to go down this route. All in all I would recommend you to just try for this scholarship if you are taking HSK3/HSKK and your goal is to study Chinese for one year only. Let us know how you get on and maybe some of your experiences studying so far/ motivations for applying? Aaron
  49. 1 point
    The website: http://www.unmultimedia.org/radio/chinese/ has an extensive archive of thousands of news articles and magazines in Chinese (as well as all other UN languages). Each article includes a word for word transcript and audio read by different reporters. Many of the magazine articles are 10 minutes and over of dialogue along with accurate transcripts. It's all free and extremely beneficial to students in the intermediate-advanced levels!
  50. 1 point
    Deutsche Welle offers courses, news, videos, podcasts etc for people learning German.
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