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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 01/18/2020 in all areas

  1. 6 points
    Took this picture on the way to IKEA this morning (doing my usually salmon run). To be fair, I would've been pretty similar last year, too. The roads are usually empty on New Year's Eve. I think people living in China are really experience this whole coronavirus differently. While a lot of people will say about people are just lying and spreading rumours on WeChat, what a lot of people don't realise is, we aren't seeing messages, we are seeing videos and government reports. When you see a video of hundreds of people screaming and crying in a Wuhan hospital, because they all have a fever, and there aren't even enough doctor to check them all, then it's scary. When you see a government issued report that before the shut down of Wuhan, 19,000 people from there travelled to Hangzhou, then it's scary. A guy in my housing complex in Hangzhou turned himself in because he had been in contact with people from Wuhan who had the virus, but luckily he was cleared. If you're in China and want to get a clearer picture, you can contact your local districts office. They're all up to date and pretty honest about everything that's happening. I keep seeing a lot of 'it's all lies' and 'it's not a big deal' online, especially in places like Reddit, but for us living in China, we don't use papers and journalists to see what the situation is like, we get to see real people's videos and photos that they've posted on their moments.
  2. 6 points
    update 2: so far everything that weve been told earlier by a relative who works in pharma here in china has been extremely accurate. Today he said that the disease has now been proven to be contractable via the eyes. Wuhan is shut completely now, but luckily not yichang. Were going to the countryside tomorrow for new years then gonna try and fly out via chongqing asap. Today the fear is real, nobody leaving the house, nobody outside on the streets, its weird being in such a quiet China…
  3. 5 points
    Having just returned to Canada, following a rather lengthy Christmas visit, I would like to provide a bit of an update to the current WeChat/AliPay cashless options for non-Chinese nationals. I have experience in IT, have lived in China, and speak the language rather fluently; so, one would assume that if the average person should be able to get this working, I should find it a breeze: Foreign nationals who reside in China can use both services, just like a local, provided they have a local Chinese bank account number. Non-resident foreign nationals do not have this option. AliPay does work, provided you are OK with the rather significant caveats. First, non-resident foreign nationals MUST use the AliPay Tourist Pass option, as a regular account requires either a domestic Chinese bank account number or a Chinese ID card number. Second, AliPay Tourist Pass MUST be configured using an overseas mobile number, so make sure you get things set up before you depart. This also means that if AliPay Tourist Pass ever locks your account, you're out of luck as you likely won't be able to access your SMS text messages, from back home, which is uses for verification. Third, AliPay charges a 5% transaction fee in addition to the 3-5% transaction fee charged by credit cards for foreign currency transactions, making this an absolutely horrible value proposition when compared to simply carrying cash. Fourth, if Google/Apple store reviews are anything to go by, not only are there significant limits to time (max 90 days per account), and significant transaction limits (currently 5000 CNY), but some accounts are being frozen (along with all the money in them) with little to no recourse. Summary: Can work; but with high fees, and high risk. WeChat Pay is further behind the curve even than the AliPay Tourist Pass mess, described above, to the point where it seems non-resident foreign nationals still cannot use the service at all. You may be able to add your foreign credit card; however, you will not be allowed to add funds from them, nor will you be able to send/receive money from other WeChat users. Real name verification still requires a local bank account or Chinese ID card number, even though a passport option exists. Finally, attempting to use said passport option got my WeChat Pay account frozen. After three weeks of dealing with telephone support (Chinese language only), my WeChat Pay account is both frozen (due to "suspicious activity") and unable to be cancelled (due to a balance which exists from before these regulations barring foreigners took effect). Odds are, I will need to start a whole new WeChat account, in future, and somehow move over all my contacts, in order to rectify this mess. If this ever does get fixed, however, I will update the post. Summary: Doesn't work, full stop. Make use of the passport option and you run the risk of permanent loss of WeChat Pay functionality even if/when they full support on-resident foreign nationals. in a nutshell, I would bet that very few non-resident foreign nationals will make use of either service any time soon, and those that do are subjecting themselves to what feels like a Wild West of extortionate fees and frozen accounts. I normally like to present things in a more positive light, or at the very least provide mere facts without editorializing. That said, it would be remiss of me to not admit that the whole mess has left be with a very poor impression of both services. Use at your own risk.
  4. 3 points
    "It doesn't bother you that is 'Story from China' card is only pulled out whenever the West needs to be distracted from US Politics?" Wrong thread wrong time. What does bother me is folk who have to throw Donald Trump into every discussion no matter the relevancy. What a bore.
  5. 3 points
    I'm on my sixth novel, and still looking up words, but finally reading is becoming enjoyable, and my comprehension is excellent. I still encounter the occasional section where there are a number of lookups required, but even then I could skip the lookups and still mostly understand. I usually read aloud, and sometimes I'll read 3-4 pages with no lookups, knowing both the meaning and the sound/tone. I think I am still a few novels away from feeling I can read virtually anything with no phone/computer nearby, but now that I can read 10-20 pages in an hour or two, reaching the goal seems close now. And I still prefer books made of paper. I want to spend less and less time staring at a screen.
  6. 3 points
    Thanks for the tip, picked up a copy today!
  7. 2 points
    Well, 活著 is officially in the books. My first "big boy" Chinese novel. Very scared that the 2nd won't go as smoothly, so taking awhile to think about what I want to read next. Maybe 巴金。
  8. 2 points
    I lived in close contact with the SARS situation. It’s good to be cautious and being cautious does no harm. It was a nightmare during SARS in Hong Kong. When you and colleagues go through perceived risk of death everyday, it is quite depressing. People avoid you because of your job. Situation in terms of notification seems to be much better. The annual migration is definitely the X factor. Wash your hands frequently. Try to minimise touching mouth and nose. Wear a mask if you’re ill. I was on another community forum during that time. I remember a post from uk making light of the situation in Hong Kong saying to probably was overreactions. I had to give a realistic picture which wasn’t pleasant
  9. 2 points
    Bear in mind that depending on how this moves, if you happen to develop a fever from any cause and want to travel in China or leave China and enter another country, you may be quarantined until it's clear you don't have the corona virus. As Roddy points out, SARS had a big practical impact on those travelling about. I've also read other suggestions that the crunch if any will come as temperatures start to rise towards Spring, creating more favourable conditions for transmission.
  10. 2 points
    1、There are some problems with the Chinese sentence. 我一直在努力提高我的中文打字技巧,大部分时间都在努力做这件事。 我当前正在使用Win10官方输入法(IME),将我输入的拼音转换成中文简体字。 然后,我觉得我的打字速度应该还可以提升很多,而且当我从英文切换成简体切换成传统输入法时,使用IME很麻烦。 这里有人知道有什么可以提高中文打字技巧的方法吗?适应于Linux,IOS,Android等系统平台的方法也欢迎告诉。 2、I'm a Chinese software engineer.The most popular Chinese IME in China is SouGou Input Method, https://pinyin.sogou.com/.It's support Mac,Linux,Mobile.You can simple switch from English ->Simplified, you just need to press the shift key. 3、My email is [email protected],you can send email to me if you have any other questions.Welcome to China.
  11. 2 points
    @dougwar's suggestion is what you are looking for, however based on my experience, you won't really find many real-world texts that are suitable. The HSK goes for breadth rather than depth, and HSK 5 will only get you 50-70% comprehension on general native texts, and HSK 6 also falls in to the same range (only gives you a few extra percentage points of comprehension vs HSK 6). This is partly the problem that CTA was designed to solve - it helps you figure out the most relevant vocab to learn in a given piece of text, which is a far better use of time than learning words from HSK lists (see here for some figures on how that plays out). Regular reading of novels is the only thing that will do it. Train what you want to learn.
  12. 2 points
    糟糠之妻 zāo kāng zhī qī https://www.zdic.net/hans/糟糠之妻 "wife of one's chaff and dregs", the wife who shares your hardscrabble early years with you who you ought not to abandon if you make it big "糟糠之妻不下堂". Came across it in an obit for the founder of Lotte who apparently went off to Japan and did dump his first wife after starting to get on in business.
  13. 2 points
    Thank you so much! Yes, I liked the actors and much of the story. A mix of crime, psychology and romance set in Burma and the beautiful locations you mentioned. Overall a great TV show. I can also recommend "Love me if you dare" (他来了,请闭眼) (not so much location-wise, but for the suspense, romanance and criminal psychology aspect)
  14. 2 points
    I only watched a few episodes so can't remember clearly, but according to Baidu, it was most filmed in Yunnan (the big city would likely be Kunming). These are the places Baidu gives: 德宏、昆明、红河、缅甸等、西双版纳 It seems like you aren't the only one drawn in by its beautiful locations, as the writer of the below article was inspired to travel there and take these photos: http://www.sohu.com/a/118016149_491528 美不胜收 (unimaginably beautiful) is how the writer describes it - another new chengyu learnt! Did you enjoy the show (apart from its locations)?
  15. 2 points
    Reading 活著 now, about 70% through on Kindle. It is my first full novel aside from a few children's novels. I find it very easy with only a few sentences here and there that don't seem to click for me. Damn it's depressing though.
  16. 1 point
    Depends on whether you're someplace that might be susceptible to sudden quarantine, and how leaving would affect your particular situation in China. But given the right circumstances, leaving does not seem an over-reaction. Besides, this may go on for a month or two, and it's soon going to get on your nerves. Bear in mind too that if panic were to develop getting flights out on short notice might become difficult.
  17. 1 point
    Yup, I'm already on Chapter 2 of 家 Just decided to go for it after all. First chapter wasn't too bad! Some tricky stuff - maybe like 40 word lookups. I would say that it does feel a bit tougher than 活著 but not excessively so. I like the two brothers.
  18. 1 point
    Once you've chosen what to read next, my advice is to prepare for the novel after that before you finish reading this one. Even better if you can have a stack of 2-3 books you'd like to read ready to go. That way, when you finish, you don't need to take a break from reading while you think about what to read next, you can just pick it up from the bookshelf and start reading without any break in momentum.
  19. 1 point
    So I hear different English translations whether or not it's Rat or Mouse. They're different animals. So which one was in that race, a mouse or a rat?
  20. 1 point
    Verb 也不 verb is a set pattern, here it's a way of intensifying the fact that he ignores her, "wouldn't even pay her the slightest attention"; similar to 看也不看 without even taking a look, and you see it with other verbs too.
  21. 1 point
    There’s a 99.99% chance that for any given individual, this is just an interesting story they’ll tell in six months.
  22. 1 point
    Merged - please keep all announcements of new videos to the one topic.
  23. 1 point
    I never took classes with only one other student, so I can't really say for sure about that. I did take some classes with 3 other students and another series with 4 other students. These were in Beijing, at a very early stage in my Chinese study. What I remember from then (a long time ago) is that I tended to mentally half-way rest when the other students were being quizzed or answering the teacher. It was difficult for me to stay fully engaged. When I do a one-to-one class with a good teacher it is very intense. I emerge at the end exhausted, but in a good way. Sweaty and gasping for breath like after running a 10 K foot race. (Exaggerating slightly here.) There is no "coasting" at any point during the lesson. I am constantly using 100% of my resources. I've known people who disliked that situation, who found it painful., who wanted a "gentler" learning situation. Personally, I find it exhilarating and thrive on the challenge.
  24. 1 point
    This is the second story I recorded on my channel, with characters, pinyin, and clear audio, of course. A Chinese translation of an Aesop's fable. Feedback and suggestions for future content is always welcome! WATCH on YouTube >> https://youtu.be/q9mus6Sato4
  25. 1 point
    Do not lecture us on statistics if you do not know what the median is. Here is a hint: "Median age is the age that divides a population into two numerically equal groups - that is, half the people are younger than this age and half are older. It is a single index that summarizes the age distribution of a population." So, how exactly are "most of its victims above the age of 75"? Please just stop!
  26. 1 point
    I can't tell, but it looks like an anonymous prepaid bank card. Maybe you can use it by presenting the card itself at shops. But you certainly cannot use it to set up QR code payments on Alipay/Wechat, since that requires name verification with a Chinese bank account (or the new Alipay Tourist Pass).
  27. 1 point
    I got asked to offer some advice to a family that's looking at a 'volunteer teach in Chinese kindergarten' type gap year for an 18-year-old. Wrote up the below, but will be interested to see what people think. I'm not going to name the program, but roughly £2,000 costs, 2000Y monthly stipend, 4-5 months in country. My first instinct is always a 'no', but if you're 18, have the money, and fancy an well-informed adventure, I can't really see why not... ******************* I don't have a lot of recent info on these programs, so this is mostly based on speaking to people who've done them before. If they can put you in touch with recent participants, or you can track some down, that'll be much more valuable info. The teaching aspect can sometimes be quite unrewarding. People can end up in a kindergarten which wants to have visible foreign teachers to impress parents, but isn't bothered about whether they teach well or not. At an extreme, I've spoken to people who were told to be in the playground when kids were being dropped off and picked up, but never required to step inside a classroom. It's very much luck of the draw on where you get placed. The costs involved leave a bad taste in the mouth. There's little doubt in my mind that money's being taken at both ends here - you'll be paying the program fee and visa fees (which would usually be covered by the employer), and alongside whatever stipend the teachers get, the schools will also be paying the agency or their Beijing partners. However, at this age / level of experience, it's not unusual. I'd be interested to know if they're placing folk in private or state schools. State schools could at least plausibly need 'volunteer' teachers. Private ones shouldn't. I'm not even sure there are state kindergartens. It does look like they'll be getting proper work visas (the criminal record check they say you need is only required for a work visa). This is preferable to a business or tourist visa, neither of which should be used for employment. Be wary of any attempts to get you to 'come on a tourist visa and we'll change it when you get here'. Generally, have low expectations and be prepared to make the most of what you get. There's no indication of where people are being placed, and China has a LOT of small industrial towns which won't necessarily be that interesting. Promised perks like language or cultural classes can fail to materialize, or end up being quite perfunctory. But send her armed with a guide book and a phrasebook and she can have a grand old time. That probably all sounds fairly negative, and I am generally dubious about China gap years. There's a pretty standard 'degree and two years experience' requirement for teaching in China these days ( compare https://www.tefl.com/job-seeker/jobpage.html?jobId=157142&countryId=44 for example, and note pay and conditions), which leads to the question 'why aren't these schools the same?' But if the schools were sticking to that, she wouldn't be eligible. Overall, I'd say if she's keen and aware of potential pitfalls, and you're happy with the company's chat (ask them what problems they have, and why people drop out halfway, because there's no way some people don't), then go for it. ****************************************
  28. 1 point
    This would be a good time to check you're registered with your consulate and getting their emails. Presumably they're going to be thinking about what to do for nationals in Wuhan who don't want to be. WHO guy sounds quite unsure about the closure of Wuhan. Suspect there might have been a bit of surprise at that. It's unprecedented, isn't it? Even at the height of SARS, you could still get about. First time round, it was all interesting to see first hand. If I was in China now, I'd be considering a short-notice holiday.
  29. 1 point
    Why would you stay in a dormitory like that? For the chance to be a student and to better yourself. The dormitories for the factories that make iPhones and and other hi tech consumer goods for export famously have suicide nets set up around them. Any dormitory that doesn't need to have equipment to stop its residents throwing themselves over the railings is a good dormitory. Back in the day (Late '90s), accommodation for local Chinese students was always far worse than for foreign students. If I went to visit someone, I'd expect to see bunk beds lining the walls, at least 4 to a room, fluorescent strip lighting, and a giant rice cooker. A window would be a luxury. My friend in Beijing who works with recent graduates says that they're all spoilt and entitled, so I'd be fascinated to see the state inside dorms these days.
  30. 1 point
    My train yesterday was to Wuhan so you can still go there! I’m hoping that being in a sparsely populated village for a week will be an advantage but let’s see! China warns Communist Party officials: cover up spread of Wuhan virus and be ‘nailed on pillar of shame for eternity’ | South China Morning Post Chang An Jian, the official social media account of the Central Political and Legal Affairs Commission – Beijing’s top political body responsible for law and order – ran a commentary on Tuesday telling cadres not to forget the painful lessons of Sars and to ensure timely reporting of the current situation... “Anyone who puts the face of politicians before the interests of the people will be the sinner of a millennium to the party and the people,” the commentary read. “Anyone who deliberately delays and hides the reporting of [virus] cases out of his or her own self-interest will be nailed on the pillar of shame for eternity,” it added. Above summary from the sinocisim newsletter (free version).
  31. 1 point
    Guideinchina reports that WeChat pay is trialling a collaboration with Visa, Mastercard and AmEx, which would allow foreigners without a Chinese UnionPay card to finally pay for stuff without having a local bank account. Meanwhile The Beijinger also reports that the international version of the Alipay APP is now able to use the "Tour Pass" mini-program to pay for stuff via a "prepaid card service provided by the Bank of Shanghai" that can be topped up in RMB using an international credit or debit card.
  32. 1 point
    Hello all, I've done a ton of research, and following the guidelines in this post, would love your thoughts on where to study in China. Below is all the information I think I could possibly provide. Would really appreciate any and all perspectives! I've searched each school name mentioned below on this forum and read through all the threads that mention it, but some are on the older side so I thought I'd post for the freshest perspective. Level: Total beginner (except for a few months of HelloChinese - not sure that counts), though once I choose a school I plan to do online lessons for a few months between now and when I start in April. Purpose: 'Language vacation'; languages are my favorite hobby, I speak ~7 with varying degrees of proficiency but my comfort zones are Romance and Germanic. Challenging myself with Mandarin while taking some time off from a stressful job. My goal is that at the end of ~2-3 months, I can travel to a few places in China and be able to make basic arrangements without needing a guide. Timeframe: I have ~3.5 months total to spend abroad, looking to spend minimum 2 months full-time studying and at least 2-3 weeks traveling. Approx. April-Jun timeframe. Budget: Least important, all programs except LTL are well within the range, but if LTL is worth it I'll consider. Facts about me to help with recommendations: Female, young professional Happier in cold weather than in hot weather Not good at talking to strangers, but not a total introvert either Like: being active, the outdoors, cooking Dislike: partying a lot (the occasional bar outing is ok) Love big cities - Shanghai sounds great - but I think the 'contrived' environment of a private language school in a smaller city would be better in my case? Clean is better than dirty, but I have no illusions about where I'm going I'm skeptical of 'cultural activities' like calligraphy, tai chi, or tea ceremonies - I'd rather go have a conversation over coffee or go on a walk / hike… Looking for: Full-time private immersion environment (don't have enough time for a university program, and I'd like the assistance offered by private programs) A nice place to live where I can stay active and eventually use it as a home base to travel to other places on the weekends. I'd like to be able to visit parks, museums, try new restaurants etc in the afternoons - this is a language 'vacation' after all At least 4 hrs of instruction per day, ideally more Impressions from my research to date: Top candidates in no particular order are CLI in Guiling, Keats in Kunming, Omeida in Yangshuo, and LTL in Shanghai/Chengde combo program. I've emailed back and forth with each of them, and it seems like they all have a robust process for selecting teachers, so I can't seem to differentiate based on teaching quality; also someone who's done both Keats and Omeida said the quality was similar. Here's what I like and dislike about each one: CLI in Guilin: Pros: Seems like nice city with lots of weekend travel options, not sure about evenings Cons: Fewest hrs / week Will likely be very rainy in April/May Keats in Kunming: Pros: Weather Good variety of school-run activities Access to a gym arranged by the school Cons: Was told I'd get bored Omeida in Yangshuo: Pros: Sounds like the most beautiful / outdoorsy place by far with lots of hiking and biking options Cons: Will likely be very rainy in April/May, so maybe I won't be able to enjoy all that nature? Group classes is the standard; 1:1 would be an add-on Was told it's a bit of a 'party' place? Not my cup of tea LTL Shanghai and Shanghai/Chengde combo: Pros: No shortage of stuff to do in Shanghai 'Extreme Immersion' combo program w/ Chengde sounds like a great opportunity to progress quickly Big activity calendar Cons: Very expensive! I know Shanghai cost of living is high, but at LTL you have to pay extra for things that other schools offer for free (like help opening a bank account, language partner programs) Temptation to speak English in Shanghai May feel very isolated in Chengde Other questions: Why do homestays rarely work out? I know it can be a huge culture shock, but I'd imagine a good chunk of the families have experience hosting Westerners? I've seen it advised that you should stick with one program for the whole duration. Because I can't choose and have limited time, it's tempting for me to do something like a month in Kunming (Keats) and then a month doing Shanghai + Chengde with LTL... Thoughts? If you've come this far, THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR READING! Looking forward to the perspectives.
  33. 1 point
    It's just another one of those panics the media stokes. It's not a big deal, but they'll make it look like it is. Just wash your hands more often, that's really it. And even that won't make a difference if you don't encounter an infected person.
  34. 1 point
    I can't remember the last day I did no study/practice/listening/reading for at least an hour. Because I have an excrutiating hangover. Ok, i've done something. I just looked up the word for hangover 缩酒 su4jiu3. Maybe I can muster the energy to listen to a podcast on the subject.
  35. 1 point
  36. 1 point
    I've noticed this, too. Indeed, you'd have to be deaf not to. Just listen to people around you talking. (A great way to improve your listening skills, by the way.) Then count down till money rears up in the conversation somehow. It won't be long: just seconds usually.
  37. 1 point
    Your work permit (it looks like an ID card) is not the same as your residency permit (which is stuck in your passport like a visa). Your employer has to cancel your work permit. PSB cancels your residency permit. I'm not sure if anyone will be able to answer your main question though... the previous experience of other people is no guarantee of how you will be treated. Have you tried contacting an embassy or consulate of your country in China to ask them for advice?
  38. 1 point
    @Zabeth http://campuschina.org/universities/categories.html here you can search by language, provinces, and programs
  39. 1 point
    And this video to see how easy peasy and delicious it is to make egg fried rice. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TPVqyWBtE6M Sorry if you can't get YT.
  40. 1 point
    This is an excellent point. I've not faced this yet, but I could easily imagine it happening. I'll have to make sure I keep small bills with me (I don't have wechat pay).
  41. 1 point
    China was the country to invent paper money and will be the first to eliminate it. I've never had cash turned down. But I definitely have had them unable to make change. Usually they want to take your 100 and give you change on Wechat. I also tried to pay for a 20 yuan coffee at Luckin, and they flat-out refused. Download the app of GTFO. I think they're not even a coffee shop. They're going to build the app until you can buy overseas vacations and custom artwork and investment properties on it. And it'll have ads from here to next Sunday. The whole point of the coffee is to get people to install the app, and then they go from there.
  42. 1 point
    For those of you considering whether you should respond: While some of the surveys posted here were poorly developed such that I didn't respond, this one is good. It didn't take much time. I liked that it offered the chance to type some free text. For Daidai: In terms of improving the survey: it asks whether the user's goal is to write Chinese characters. I assumed this meant "hand write characters." I now spend zero time trying to hand write characters (我不会写), but I want to improve my ability to type Chinese (打字). While some who post to this website also are learning to hand write characters, there are also likely many like me whose goal is to be able to communicate verbally & electronically.
  43. 1 point
  44. 1 point
    Don't be fooled. Finnish schools were once the envy of the world, but their embrace of progressive education policy is coming to fruition and the result is a continued slip down PISA rankings. The UK, on the other hand, has embraced some aspects of traditional teaching methods that would be common place in schools in China, and they have seen their position move up recently. I'd like to know what exactly is meant by "traditional Chinese teaching methods", and how this differs from just plain "traditional teaching methods". The forefront of the educational debate in the UK is a return to certain aspects of so-called "traditional" teaching, mainly as a remedy to going too far down the progressive rabbit-hole. I wouldn't want to go to a Chinese school, but there are plenty of "traditional" schools in the UK that I would be more than happy attending. On the question of whether or not British pupils are tough enough for a Chinese school, the answer is emphatically "yes". To find out what's happening, simply google "strict schools in britain" and you'll see what our young men and women are capable of.
  45. 1 point
    Heard this in the wild yesterday: https://www.zdic.net/hans/叫号 Quite logical but never encountered it before AFAIK. Context was swapping empty cooking gas bottle, which is subsidised in this village. Gas company delivered slightly fewer bottles than people had put in to exchange, so full ones were handed out in order of who'd delivered empties first. Glad I got up early and was second on list!
  46. 1 point
    An apt metaphor. I’m currently sprawled out in the sand with the carrion birds circling above, the mirage of “enough characters” constantly shifting in the distance.
  47. 1 point
    I feel good. My general reading ability has improved. Compared with a couple years ago—when I started with Chinese literature—I read faster and refer to dictionaries less than before. I understand more of what I read and can engage with literary works critically (e.g., get a feel for differences in style and tone, assess their merits and weaknesses, etc.). I am starting to enjoy Chinese literature as literature, rather than as a series of difficult foreign texts. This is very satisfying and rewarding, and was in fact my primary goal. Reading millions of characters in a non-native language is a useful motivational frame, but of secondary importance. I am also more confident that I will read very difficult Chinese literature that not-to-long-ago seemed far beyond my abilities. I want to (eventually) read works like 《倾城之恋》, 《狂人日记》, and 《红楼梦》. I believe that someday I can and will. Many years ago, I read David Foster Wallace’s magnum opus Infinite Jest. Working through and completing this massive work was a formative experience in my twenties; it made me think about and appreciate our world differently, and in (I hope) a fuller and more nuanced and empathetic and emotionally available way. Reading a million characters of mostly beautifully written Chinese feels kinda like that. Life is precious and short and brutal and lovely and much more. At their best, literature and the arts capture and represent these aspects of life in ways that more mundane day-to-day experience often hides or obscures. Our world is vast and complex. Artists in different cultures get a handle on this vastness and complexity differently. This difference is really what I’m after, and it’s why I read in Chinese.
  48. 1 point
    Thank you for helping people with Chinese If I can give you some advice: there are tons of channels out there. So, look for a niche! For instance, you could focus on teaching Chinese by explaining lyrics from Chinese songs, Chinese movie subtitles, etc. Also, if I were you I would first create 100-200 videos and only then go "online". If you publish only 1 video per week and you have only 5-10 videos in your channel, then your channel will get little traffic and will be "irrelevant" (i.e. people will not register it compared to Chinesepod, Mandarincorner, etc)
  49. 1 point
    Any raccoon-dog eating success to report? Did it go marvellously with some fava beans and a nice Chianti?
  50. 1 point
    It would be awesome if he comes out spouting Marxist rhetoric and decides to dedicate his life to the revolution. Get him to log on here ASAP.
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