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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 11/11/2019 in all areas

  1. 4 points
    Yeah I bought a little 12' jonboat and cruise around the canals. Wenzhou is pretty unusual in that the city waterways are open to private boats. Most cities are closed entirely. It's Wenzhou's long history of dragon boats that does it. It's pretty cool cruising around, it's a side of the city I've never seen before. All sorts of things go on on the water that you'd never know about. Under some of the bridges are these cool murals that you can never see unless you're on the water. The boat's tied up under a bridge for now, though, getting too cold. I have to stop adopting seasonal hobbies that require good weather.
  2. 3 points
  3. 2 points
    Hey guys, for all of you that are hungry for listening material, I'd like to signal this podcast I came across recently. http://voice.beartalking.com/ Although I only listened to a few episodes at the moment, I quite like it as it is interesting, very clear and relatively easy to understand (I would say that it is suitable for students at about HSK 5 ish?) Looking forward to hearing your opinions, or suggestions if you have similar- or better resources to share.
  4. 2 points
    your description is kind of vague, perhaps 阿Q? or are you thinking of a real person?
  5. 2 points
    Surely you could just use anki for free, and is highly customisable if needed. This looks like a massive waste of money if you ask me. If you had to force me onto any subscription service for character learning, I would choose skritter, but even thats pointless in the face of buying a pen and pad and then using anki. The selling point appears to be its 'painless', fun interface, but it will look pretty painful on your bank account when you've spent all your money, cant remember much, then get locked out from your own flashcards...
  6. 2 points
    Chili Oil Update -- 红油 Made a batch of this glorious stuff again today and realized it had been about two years since I first wrote it up. It has become one of the staples in my kitchen, something it would be difficult to live without. Although the basic recipe is the same today as it was in 2017, I've gradually evolved a couple small hacks that make the results more consistent without any extra work. I usually just whip this up from memory, without using an actual written recipe. It helps that the measurements are not critical. You will need about two handfuls of dried peppers 干辣椒 and a generous cup of rapeseed oil 菜籽油。Peanut oil will work but is not as flavorful. All the other dry ingredients are optional although the Sichuan peppercorns 花椒 (huajiao) really add a lot. They and they alone can supply that distinctive tongue-tingling kick that separates Sichuan cuisine from anything else in the whole world. They are the "ma" component of the Sichuan "ma-la" flavor marriage 麻辣味。 The quantity of the dry ingredients follows the “law or one or two.” One or two teaspoons of Sichuan peppercorns 花椒, one or two bay leaves 香叶, one or two cloves of garlic 大蒜,一两瓣,one or two small pieces of dry tangerine peel 橙皮, one or two small pieces of Chinese cinnamon 桂皮, one or two teaspoons of fennel seeds 小茴香,one or two cloves 丁香,one or two pieces of star anise 八角,one or two pods of black cardamom 草果, one or two teaspoons of white sesame seeds 白芝麻。As a practical matter, what I would suggest is to use one of each first time out of the starting gate, and then adjust to taste next time you make it. It helps to think of the process as having discrete parts. It helps to sort of “stage it” in an orderly manner. 1. Toast the peppers and the huajiao to let them develop more flavor. First toast the peppers alone in a medium hot skillet and scoop them out. Only takes about a minute. Then toast the huajiao the same way. This gives the flavors a huge boost, but you must be careful not to scorch them. Best to err on the side of too little time, not on the side of too much. 2. Let the peppers cool and then grind them in a blender or crush them with a mortar and pestle. If you want less fire from your chili oil, take out some of the seeds before you grind the peppers. The flavor will still be rich and round. Put the ground chilis and a teaspoon or two of white sesame seeds into a heatproof bowl. 3. Make hot flavored oil. Do this by heating the rapeseed oil and the other dry ingredients together over medium-low heat for a couple minutes, stirring as they cook. Then strain and discard the solids. 4. Reheat the flavored oil until it’s good and hot, almost ready to smoke. If you have an instant read thermometer, this is 190 degrees Celsius. If you don’t have a thermometer, float a couple slices of ginger on the surface of the oil. When they become deep golden and the margins start to curl, the oil is hot enough. 5. Pour the hot oil into the ground chilies to cook them. Do it in two batches. Pour in half the oil and stir as it spits, bubbles and sizzles. Then pour in the second half of the hot oil. This sounds like extra trouble, but it allows the peppers to cook at two different temperatures and gives the resulting sauce a complex robust flavor. (Please click the photos to enlarge them.) This is what mine looked like today. If it stands out overnight, the flavor becomes richer and more unified. I put about half of the chili oil in a small ceramic pot that stays on my dining table. The rest goes into a lidded jam jar which I put in the fridge. It keeps just fine for a month. It might last much longer. I can’t really say: mine always gets used up. The distinctive thing about this essential Chinese condiment is that it does more than simply add heat to a dish. Difficult to describe, but it has subtle qualities that boost other flavors without covering them up. People just thinking about it in the abstract usually don't "get it." It is used as a table condiment as well as having an important place in cooking SW Chinese food. Throughout Yunnan, most informal restaurants and cafes will have a pot of this on the table. A dispenser for dark vinegar 老陈醋 and soy sauce 生抽 will most likely be somewhere else back by the kitchen. The "table condiment" array might be rounded out with a small dish or shaker of salt 食盐 and another of plain MSG crystals 味精。 Health warning: If you try this real-deal, home-made seasoning once, there’s a good chance you will become addicted.
  7. 2 points
    This came up in a Google search, it's from Hodder Education's website: the link leads to this 56 pages pdf: https://www.hoddereducation.co.uk/media/Documents/International/Biology-for-the-IB-Diploma/IGCSE-Mandarin-Workbook-Answers.pdf?ext=.pdf If those aren't the answers you're looking for, you could contact Hodder Educational International, they may be able to help you https://www.hoddereducation.co.uk/international-curricula/cambridge-assessment-international-education
  8. 2 points
    When this new member contacted me by private message yesterday, I suggested he post his question here so others could help as well. Also wrote him the following: To get that special sour and salty taste, you will need a Sichuan spice called doubanjiang. It is made from a special type of fermented broad beans. It's essential in Sichuan stir-fry cooking. It might not be locally available, but maybe you can order it. Nothing else has quite the same taste. The Chinese for it is 豆瓣酱。The best of it comes from a county in Sichuan named Pixian. The Chinese for Pixian County is 郫县。So if you can find Pixian doubanjiang, that would be perfect. Here's the Chinese for that 郫县豆瓣酱。 The thing about a dish like Sichuan Beef is that there are many ways to make it. Every cook will have his own variations on the method. One may be more to your liking than others. Many times authentic Sichuan recipes for dishes of this kind also use pickled peppers 泡辣椒. (Wet, not dry.) They increase the sour "kick" at the same time as ramping up the heat a little bit. Here's a reliable recipe that I've used with minor adaptations. The author is an experienced Chinese cook, not some random Youtube cowboy. She gives clear instructions about ingredients and technique. Try it and see if it's what you have in mind. We can use that as a starting point and then help you work towards the desired result. https://omnivorescookbook.com/szechuan-beef-stir-fry/ Hope that helps. Welcome to the forum!
  9. 2 points
    We've asked many many many times here: please show the whole plate, not just some tiny little keyhole picture of the mark. A view of the front would tell at a glance whether it's Japanese or Chinese, plus more. 这是日本深川制瓷品。
  10. 2 points
    In our pronunciation course I call this "aiming at the target." It can be a bit overwhelming at first, but you should always prioritize imitating authentic, natural speech. Unnaturally slowing things down isn't doing you any favors, even though it may make things seem easier.
  11. 1 point
    So tell me, how do we know how to "duh, skip the post" unless we read it first. Duh. If you think you were put on this earth to lecture men on their behaviour, please head over to someplace like The Guardian where you'll feel right at home. But keep that stuff out of here.
  12. 1 point
    Did we really need to have that little lecture delivered here? Nothing in this thread called for it. And it's rather insulting. Besides, there's already a place for men who want to be dumped on like that. It's called The Guardian.
  13. 1 point
    FOR GUYS/GENTLEMEN: make sure you don't hit on a woman who is sitting in a car you are driving. Do not touch them, but also do not chat them up (because then the woman will be afraid your next step will be touching her). Do not ask their address or their work address or whether they have a boyfriend. Do not compliment their body or their looks in general. Not all women will feel threatened by every one of these actions, but you don't know which one will, so just don't. Just talk about the weather or the traffic, or don't talk at all. Why do I write all this: because it is not on women to stop rapes and if a woman is harrassed, it is not her fault for not photographing the license place. Women don't rape themselves, not in taxis not anywhere else. If sexual harrassment and rape are to stop, it is men (and other perpetrators) who need to stop doing it.
  14. 1 point
    There used to be plenty of places in Wudaokou and surrounds that offered shorter term rentals-like 5 months-to cater to all the short term students like you. However, these were usually at a premium. As Roddy suggests, if you look further out from Wudaokou the rent will get cheaper. Especially if you’re going North of Wudaokou (you’ve got the whole of line 13 to choose from). This would be a commute to class though. A subway train ride then a bus or bike to classes. I’m not sure but based on general inflation Shangdi probably isn’t that affordable now either. If you went somewhere that wasn’t on the subway line but commutable by bus or bike you’d like find it much cheaper. As above, the big issue for you is your time frame Combined with your budget. The time frame isn’t that big a deal in WDK where it’s pretty common. However, your budget might not be enough. Then again, you never know. Finding other foreigners who need to fill a room is also a good way to find a place. You can check thebeijinger classified ads for foreigners listing rooms. Are you 100% set on Tsinghua? You could go somewhere smaller like Minzu University. Might be easier to get a dorm room or find cheaper accommodation around the area.
  15. 1 point
    鞬 jian1, a quiver holster for use on horseback, appeared in the word 弓鞬 (as to be expected I suppose) I love these old military equipment characters, they always look so complex, yet break down in such a simple way, its almost always just 革 + phonetic component.
  16. 1 point
    BCT has definitely been around for a while, I took it in 2012 (it was heavily encouraged to take it). I don’t know whether it became harder than it used to be, but the test I took was a joke - as per the test, applying your language skills for buying apples at the market can be considered a Chinese business situation
  17. 1 point
    The MCT is new, never seen that before. BCT and the YCT have been around a while, but not sure how much take up they get.
  18. 1 point
    A female friend was once felt up by the driver while sitting in the jump seat. I once got a driver who started to remark how beautiful I was. After that I stopped riding in the front seat. In the back seat you can still be kidnapped & raped, but at least you're a little harder to reach during the drive. But I suppose for men, riding in the jump seat can be a good idea. As to the Didi driver: I suppose one could categorise this as 恶劣的服务, since making the passenger feel safe is a pretty basic requirement of good 服务. Can you add remarks to as why exactly the 服务 was 恶劣?
  19. 1 point
    I've never heard of anybody taking the "BCT" or the "MCT". Searching the forums yields one person who took the BCT, and no results for the MCT.
  20. 1 point
    I've found a website that has quite a few anime series, in both Mandarin and Cantonese: http://www.ktkkt.com/g/ I'm not always a huge fan of anime but I had a quick look through and saw that I've watched and enjoyed in the past: My Hero Academia Mandarin | Cantonese Full Metal Alchemist Mandarin Dragon Ball Z Mandarin Mob Psycho 100 Mandarin
  21. 1 point
    I can't understand very much of it, but my reading is lightyears ahead of my listening. Chinese Through Stories until I get on that level...
  22. 1 point
    Nice touch with the Bonne Maman jars!
  23. 1 point
    For a short stay you might also look into a month-to-month hotel rental, perhaps further out if you really want to save money. Advantage -- big advantage -- is no middleman, no big deposit, freedom to move somewhere else after a month if it doesn't work out. No kitchen if you want to cook, but you'll get housekeeping instead.
  24. 1 point
    “A couple of times here I have left the Didi with 你应该睡觉!” 师傅,你瞌睡得太厉害!快休息吧。现在开车不安全。
  25. 1 point
    How far out on the subway do you need to go nowadays to get cheaper rents? Back in my day people were starting to move out towards Shangdi for cheaper rents than Wudaokou, but a quick trip in to class on Line 13. For the OP - your problem isn't just the budget, it's the short rental term. You'll be a lot better off looking at people who've already rented a flat and need someone to fill a spare room.
  26. 1 point
    I'm not the most talkative of souls in taxis, but that would inspire some pretty aggressive conversation making on my part. Perhaps even a song. 恶劣 here is probably better 'poor quality' - perhaps best translated as 'poor service / attitude'
  27. 1 point
    No matter where you are, you stop and get out of the car!
  28. 1 point
    Hello I write from Europe, there are very few Chinese restaurants in my area. One of them has delicious Sichuan beef sirloin on the menu. I would like to learn how to make it, I have tried many recipes from the internet and this is still not it. I have a problem to get a "watery" sauce and a clear spicy, salty and sour taste. My dishes do not have this clear salty and sour taste and the whole is sticky or reduced. There are instructions in the recipes that I have, I don't know what to change or what I do wrong. Or these recipes are wrong. Do any of you have a good and tested recipe for such a dish? I use Doubanjiang paste because it is recommended in many recipes. Please, help, because Im lack ideas!
  29. 1 point
    给自己的情书 Love letter to myself Original by 王菲 Translated and performed by Enjune Zhang 请不要灰心 你也会有人妒忌 Please don't be upset You may be envied by someone else 你仰望到太高 贬低的只有自己 Don't look up above so high That you forget about yourself 别荡失太早 旅游有太多胜地 There are so many choices for journey Don't linger around everywhere And lose yourself 你记住你发肤 会与你庆祝钻禧 Just don't forget the color of hair and skin It will see you through your love and marriage 啦啦啦 慰藉自己 AH Comfort yourself 开心的东西要专心记起 Remember only the best And leave out all the rest 啦啦啦 爱护自己 是地上拾到的真理 AH Love yourself That's the truth of happiness Better than the rest 写这高贵情书 I have this love letter for myself 用自言自语 作我的天书 I see what it means While I am talking to myself 自己都不爱 怎么相爱 How could we love one another If we fail to care ourselves 怎么可给爱人好处 How could we bring others the best 这千斤重情书 Love letter heavier than I could tell 在夜阑尽处 如门前大树 It looks like a big tree Standing outside my door Where the night ends 没有他倚靠 No worry about whether it's rainy 归家也不必撇雨 When you come home without his company 请不要哀伤 我会当你是偶像 Please don't be in tears I will take you as my idol shining 你要别人怜爱 先安装一个药箱 Get a medical kit Before you have someone else's sympathy 做什么也好 别为着得到赞赏 Do whatever you like Not just for praise from others' lips 你要强壮到底 再去替对方设想 Be strong enough to stand against the world Before you show your pity 啦啦啦 慰藉自己 AH Comfort yourself 开心的东西要专心记起 Remember only the best And leave out all the rest 啦啦啦 爱护自己 是地上拾到的真理 AH Love yourself That's the truth of happiness Better than the rest 写这高贵情书 I have this love letter for myself 用自言自语 作我的天书 I see what it means While I am talking to myself 自己都不爱 怎么相爱 How could we love one another If we fail to care ourselves 怎么可给爱人好处 How could we bring others the best 这千斤重情书 在夜阑尽处 Love letter heavier than I could tell 在夜阑尽处 如门前大树 It looks like a big tree Standing outside my door Where the night ends 没有他倚靠 No worry about whether it's rainy 归家也不必撇雨 When you come home without his company 拋得开手里玩具 Not until you let go what's in your grip 先懂得好好进睡 Can you fall into sound sleep 深谷都攀过后 Not until I'm away from the valley 从泥泞寻到这不甘心相信的金句 Do I pick up from the muddy The truth I've been unwilling to believe in 写这高贵情书 I have this love letter for myself 用自言自语 作我的天书 I see what it means While I am talking to myself 自己都不爱 怎么相爱 How could we love one another If we fail to care ourselves 怎么可给爱人好处 How could we bring others the best 这千斤重情书 Love letter heavier than I could tell 在夜阑尽处 如门前大树 It looks like a big tree Standing outside my door Where the night ends 没有他倚靠 No worry about whether it's rainy 归家也不必撇雨 When you come home without his company Love letter to myself-enjune.mp3
  30. 1 point
  31. 1 point
    I've previously shared some podcast recommendations here https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/12072-chinese-language-podcasts/?do=findComment&comment=432430 大狗熊's podcast is probably the easiest one on my list because he speaks so clearly and his show topics are never very complicated.
  32. 1 point
    A Chinese name, or even a picture, might help.
  33. 1 point
    Hey I know this podcast and sometimes listen to it in the car to immerse/ work on passive listening.. i am at HSK 3 level and for me it is quite hard to understand.. I get around 30-40% of what is said..
  34. 1 point
    Do you have the Chinese name for the dish?
  35. 1 point
    Another response when you speak naturally is "你的中文很自然." In my experience, this is a true compliment (or just an observation) as a opposed to a shallow compliment to encourage you. Exactly. This is also one of the values of learning full sentences instead of memorizing words. Learning a full sentence can give you a sense of the cadence & rhythm of the language. One thing that can help you is ask her speak at a natural speed, but to add pauses between sentences that you'll likely not know (i.e., if you're having a conversation as opposed to learning a specific sentence). If I'm talking with someone and I miss their 1st sentence, I'll be thinking about that sentence while they say sentence 2, 3 & 4 and as result, miss all of it. Pauses helps with this.
  36. 1 point
    The recording gives much insight: yes, I would agreed that it's too slow (and artificial). I also wonder what is lost if a person always speaks Chinese in an artificially slow or very distinct manner. In English, a person would lose the chance to develop natural speech. A person who teaches accent reduction in the US taught me about the problems of teaching people "clearly spoken" English, i.e., the learner will likely not sound natural. E.g., Americans rarely say "thank you", we usually say "than kyou." Not "each other" but "ea chother". A person who says "thank you" and "each other" and a myriad of other examples can sound staccato & not natural (except in certain situations). I wonder if a similar situation can happen in Chinese? (i.e., do spoken Chinese words get re-bracketed as in English?) I was unaware of the re-bracketing in English until it was pointed out to me (but I'm also not an English teacher). (re-bracketing is not a new phenomenon in English. E.g., the word "alone" was originally "all one." The nickname of "Ned" for Ed was a re-bracketing of meine Ed).
  37. 1 point
    I don't know how to say this without it being taken the wrong way so I am just going to say it. - That voice would drive me nuts. It sounds like a machine talking. I would definitely ask her to speak normally and at a normal speed.
  38. 1 point
    I think Wechat just made a vapour ware announcement to keep up with Alipay. Like I said, Wechat wasted a lot of people's time on this before and here they are doing it again. Don't be a sucker and fall for this.
  39. 1 point
  40. 1 point
    I really think that from Day One your teacher should speak naturally. Simple language, clearly pronounced, but at normal speed. Remember, you don't have to understand everything. A good classroom teacher will always be chatting away just to help the class to become accustomed to the sounds of the language, knowing full well that the students aren't grasping everything. Indeed, you'll study for years and you still won't understand every word everyone says. An important part of learning Chinese -- any language really -- is developing a knack for quickly grasping the meaning without trying to catch every word.
  41. 1 point
    Fact check: False
  42. 1 point
    If you like chilli enough to make this, would you mind if everything was chillified?
  43. 1 point
    You live in Taiwan. They do that to the freshly-arrived 阿兜仔 who hasn't learned anything other than 謝謝, and they'll also do it to the guy who's lived here 30 years, teaches conference interpretation and whose Chinese is indistinguishable from a native speaker's. It doesn't mean anything. They could just as easily be saying "it's nice out today, isn't it?" You need to try to internalize the patterns and vocabulary you're learning to the point that you don't have to do all the thinking you're talking about. Say them over and over again with correct pronunciation, tones, intonation, grammar, usage, etc. (preferably imitating a recording of a native speaker speaking as naturally as possible) until you can't get them wrong. Then go out and use them with native speakers. Shop owners, waiters, members of your preferred sex at the bar, friends. That's how you fix stilted speech. You have to listen, listen, listen and mimic, mimic, mimic. Language is sound patterns, and the closer your production of those sound patterns resembles native speakers, the less accent you'll have and the easier it will be to communicate and integrate into society.
  44. 1 point
    Hey guys, I've been living in China for about three years. I've never been much for formal study, but I think my Chinese is very good anyways. Plenty of Chinese people tell me I sound real good. Check it out. Would appreciate the feedback. Here it is.ExpertChinese.mp3 Regards, West Texas
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