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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 01/15/2019 in all areas

  1. 6 points
    2019 ∞ 新年新希望 - 目标是进步神速 - 从中级到高级? 第一。 通过HSK四考试 (三月二十三号), 通过HSK五考试 (大概十一月十号) 第二。 每个礼拜 - 13.5 小时上课 (5 + 4 + 1.5 + 3) - 15 小时电视节目和电影, 上网时评 - 10. 小时 听力 (在开车去办公室的路上) - 10. 小时自己复习 共同:48.5 第三。 去中国五次 - 大概三月左右。 带我的太太和孩子去台湾流游。 第四。 阅读一些本书在我的中文图书馆。 谢谢你饿动力。
  2. 3 points
    If you search around a bit here, I think you'll find other discussions of gift-giving in China. The basic problem is that a gift imposes an obligation on the recipient to somehow reciprocate. So a gift is in fact a burden. Of course, if your gift is itself an act of reciprocation, that just balances the relationship. But you need to make clear, in a suitably discreet fashion, that you're reciprocating some kindness. I don't think engagement presents are common in China. And at the wedding itself, you come bearing cash, not a blender. As with the knife, gifts related to the recipient's profession are often problematical. A gift reflective of your home country and culture is probably safest. (But take off the "Made in China" label first.)
  3. 2 points
    I learned “锄头” from《活着》too! Also “田埂” and “骰子”.... Those words stuck out because they appear many times in the beginning of the novel.
  4. 2 points
    Not sure if this qualifies, but it's been cropping up in Singapore for a while and I only recently worked out what it was. "Huat ah!"(發呵?) is a traditional greeting in Singapore and Malaysia, apparently coming from Southern Min as an exclamation to wish oneself or others luck. I've heard it at CNY and other festivals in SG. It took me a while to realise that 發 is the trad version of 发... not that it really helps with translation.
  5. 1 point
    Announcements We encourage you to sign up for events on Meetup.com Any specific feedback on previous months’ activities? Would someone else like to try taking notes? We welcome feedback! Comments to blog posts are fine Private messages through Meetup.com or WeChat work as well Review of last month's meeting Introductions at 1:30 pm Q&A Activity: Intro to WeChat vocabulary: 加我吧,请加我,发信息,发微信,发短信,微信群,把我加到群里吧,你想加入我们的群吗?, 请扫我,你来扫我吧,我来扫你吧,发语音,翻译 WeChat functionality (15 minutes): Scan someone Let someone else scan you Add someone to group by letting them scan the group QR code Translate message Send voice message Create group Mention: switch interface to Chinese, export to email, people nearby, shake How to ask for help in WeChat group (15 minutes): Simple question: expect a direct answer Non-question: how do I say this? Question in quotes: how do I ask this in Chinese? Voice message: how is my pronunciation? Answer questions in WeChat group (30 minutes): 你最喜欢吃什么? 你上次旅游的时候去了哪里?玩了什么? 请你描述一下你很喜欢的电影的情节,但不要暴露电影的名字哦! 请你给我们推荐一个跟中国或中文有关的作品 Play a round of Werewords if there's time Optional Mandarin corner for 15-30 minutes (set timer) Notes for future reference: wechat in chinese webcomics (pair up) dictation (google translate) translation (poem, song, dialogue) partial verses interview art museum madlibs text adventure
  6. 1 point
    How about 免費取閱 or 歡迎取閱 (free to take and read / welcome to take and read) for this case. I agree with anonymoose, 領取 sounds like you need to go somewhere and fetch it, though the phrase itself is quite common. Googling 免費領取 turns up a lot of "go to this website and you can grab an electronic coupon" results. Another common expression is 免費索取 (free to request (e.g. a sample)).
  7. 1 point
    You can use Google Translate in China via this URL: https://translate.google.cn/ The mobile Translate app is also usable in China since 2017.
  8. 1 point
    陈郁融 Chén Yùróng If you're outside China, you can put this in Google translate to listen to the pronunciation
  9. 1 point
    I was quite shocked when I saw this poster last week. It can't be, can it? Do I have a particularly dirty mind, I asked myself. Well, dirty maybe, particularly definitely not, I concluded. This is a well-known wordplay. So well-known that whoever made this poster had to use quotation marks to eliminate ambiguity. But the quotation marks only serve to remind the reader that there is another reading. So the shock was calculated. Which leaves me wondering how low can you go in advertising these days. (For anyone who doesn't get it, 下面 = the nether regions.)
  10. 1 point
    We need to see some pictures of your 书法 now! I'm with agewisdom. After spending the first two years filling notebooks and notebooks with Chinese writing, I rarely pick up a pen anymore except to take notes. My handwriting in English is awful so I doubt the world will miss my Chinese handwriting. Goal 1: Finish my thesis! (before March) Goal 2: Pass my defense! (April) Goal 3: Pass HSK 6! (after April)
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