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Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/22/2021 in all areas

  1. You already asked whether this phrase has a similar figurative meaning to "aim for the moon" in English. The answer is still no. Changing 月球 to 月亮 makes no difference to that answer. The only difference is that 月球 is a more scientific term referring to the physical celestial body of the moon, whereas 月亮 is a more everyday term. The suggestion from your friend that you posted in that earlier thread, 九天攬月, remains by far the best option for the meaning you're trying to convey.
    5 points
  2. I have occasionally felt this frustration, but most of it comes from other people, directed at me. Especially when engaging in small talk, when somebody realizes I'm interested in Chinese. "Why would you ever want to learn Chinese?" "How do you plan to use it?" "Why haven't you already learned how to speak it?" "Why is it taking so long?" "Without immersing yourself in China, how do you ever hope to succeed?" My country (the USA) is infamous for its resistance to learning languages--most of us only know English. Most people around the world have to learn 2 or even 3 languages. So most people I
    4 points
  3. Before the pandemic I taught a weekly basic English class at my local senior center for Chinese-speakers, which was pretty rewarding.
    4 points
  4. I unwittingly hijacked a thread about how to find a replacement battery for a phone while in China. https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/61375-buying-samsung-note9-battery/?tab=comments#comment-480833 Wasn't my intent, but by telling several anecdotes over the course of several days, I kind of veered away from the main topic. I apologize for that. Will try to repair the damage by moving the anecdotes to a new thread, here. The thing they have in common was that each of these practical tasks helped me master some bits of the language. If you are someone who like
    4 points
  5. As I have been working with this flash card deck for a little while now, I thought I’d do a quick review. Enjoyed writing this so it turned out to be bit longer than intended though…. tl;dr I like this deck a lot und fully expect to use it for years to come. Made by someone who seems to know a thing or two about Chinese and learning with flashcards. Recommended. Background: As this is one of my first posts – I have been studying Chinese for roughly 2 years. Busy job, so class on Saturday mornings at the Confucius Institute and flashcards (up to HSK 4 level
    3 points
  6. I've been studying for 10+ years and I occasionally bump up against this... I simply have no practical use for my Chinese abilities. It sure is a fun and rewarding hobby most of the time but I don't use it for work, I don't have any Chinese friends or family in my immediate vicinity, and there are no other interactions in my daily life which would require me to use it much at all. I like Chinese movies and novels but again there are few I know who share those interests. I guess it is strange to think this way because there are plenty of people who speak Chinese far better than I d
    3 points
  7. The only kind of awkwardness I've had in the UK a couple of times is talking to people who have one Chinese-speaking parent but never learned Chinese themselves. And it's only awkward beacuse they both sort of beat themselves up about never learning the language. Or have the kind of exaggerated wow-that's-special but-also-genuinely-interested reaction that is normal enough in China but not elsewhere. In the UK the reaction generally is more like if you'd say you were training to become an Olympic Taekwondo champion. Bit niche, I should probably know if that's the kicking one or the wrestling o
    3 points
  8. I wouldn't say that the responses have ever been 100% negative. It's been like, "Oh, wow! Chinese! That sounds hard. Why do you want to learn that?" Much of the time, it's a polite, even if awkward, response. I certainly understand that Chinese can be a very niche hobby, and very few people in my part of the world would be interested in it. Therefore, it becomes a pretty big discussion stopper. A "non-starter," socially speaking. "Huh...that's cool. What else do you do with your free time?" That sort of thing. Even the topic of China itself is a non-starter. Although it dominates the American
    3 points
  9. Yeah same experience here. I might be a tad too self-conscious, but I got to the point that I generally refrain from saying publicly that I study Chinese, because I know most of the times people do not understand and I'll get myself in a very awkward conversation. It is completely absurd for me to see that people appreciate other people for dedicating thousands of hours in activities like playing videogames, collecting stamps or polishing the bonnet of a car to a shine, without reservations, but they can't understand why you would want to learn a language. My conclusion is tha
    3 points
  10. I got my copy signed by Chen Zhongshi himself when he came to Beijing to do a talk years back! Carpenter Wei is a character, he's mentioned in this review: https://www.douban.com/group/topic/32002769/ Lu is right about the 摊派, as well as sharing round a work quota like this it's also used for having a whip-round when e.g. you decide to do up the shrine to the God of the Soil.
    3 points
  11. I really like the ranbow bridge stories. I am currently at the lowest level. I bought the rainbow bridge starter bundle for Pleco, but I think there is no difference to the paper versions. What is in it: One story per book. All stories are written in (simplified) hanzi with no pinyin. Every story comes with a translation, some exercises and the solutions to the exercises. The stories I have read so far are old chinese myths and fairy tales. What I like: They are "real" stories. No stiffly choreographed dialogs of real life situations. No toddlers books. But stories with a st
    3 points
  12. If that's how you feel, then maybe that's something worth pursuing? Why not do something with it after all? Join a local meet-up or something, you can use it to socialise or enjoy cultural events. I dunno your particular situation but one thing I've done this semester at University is seek out Mandarin language clubs. If it bothers you that you're not using it more, then find excuses to use it more. Socialising isn't a time-waste despite how we often feel about "being productive" these days.
    3 points
  13. Timeline of the dynasties: https://lensdump.com/i/ZzoQE0 These dynasty names are often used in literature, people's names/titles, stories, etc. -- anytime you feel lost for not having a time reference for these dynasties, just swipe open your desktop!
    3 points
  14. These sites have a lot of Cantonese dubs but you can find Mandarin dubs as well. Just look for 国语/國語 (guoyu) and you can find a treasure trove of classic anime in Mandarin. https://www.yueyuds.com/dongman https://www.ktkkt.top/ Here are also sites that have local chinese anime. Just look for 动画 (donghua) Not exactly sure if that is what you asked for but if the cdramas were a too dry for you then you should give these a try. https://v.qq.com/ https://www.bilibili.com/ https://www.iqiyi.com/ https://youku.com/
    3 points
  15. I’ve recently stumbled upon a book written in the early 1900’s with progressive sentences written in what appears to be literary Chinese. It starts out very simple then builds upon from there. A few people told me it’s almost like a hybrid of modern and literary, but more so further into the book. Can anyone check it out and let me know? Is this a good text following general 文言文 grammar, etc? I really like it so far. Here’s an archive.org scan: https://archive.org/details/progressiveexerc00bull/page/34/mode/2up
    2 points
  16. @Anon100 If you want a tattoo that says 'aim at the moon', nobody is stopping you. Just call a tattoo parlour right now and get an appointment, I'm sure most tattooists will be happy to ink it on you. But if you want someone here to tell you that 瞄准月亮 is a good translation for the meaning you want, that's unlikely to happen. Get any tattoo you want though, you don't need our blessing. And I don't think Demonic Duck was rude at all. He gave a good answer to your question.
    2 points
  17. The first thing that springs to mind is 扫黄 which is the standard term for a police crackdown on the sex industry, a "vice sweep". Must say your etymology sounds a bit of a folk tale; took a quick look and this seems to reckon it was derived from the English term "yellow press" for the trashier end on the newspaper market: http://www.coozhi.com/shenghuojiaju/shenghuochangshi/105575.html
    2 points
  18. I'll just say this. While I'm sure I was eventually encounter one, I have not once received a negative response to letting someone know/someone finding out that I study Chinese. People are usually either mildly impressed, or very, very interested to know about it. I'm guessing the circles I mix in might be a little self-selecting sometimes, but I don't live in a bubble by any stretch. I'm honestly a little bemused about some of the stuff people are saying in this thread. I've never experienced anything like it.
    2 points
  19. I did have a slightly different teenage experience. Although I probably would have been obsessed with Faye Wong, if I'd known she existed.
    2 points
  20. The visa situation is one problem, the other is flights. You are safer getting a flight with no transfers at this virus time, regardless of what some tickets companies sell. Tickets could cost ¥30,000 or more at this time. One way. Some ticket companies sell cheap tickets with transfers, but you'll be turned away at the airport if the transfer is not allowed due to the virus. Next year things may be better. An air bnb will not be so cheap. And I'm guessing that your visa will require you to live in campus. Much simpler living on campus. Much simpler. Kunming is a beaut
    2 points
  21. I have to say I have felt the same way - despite the fact that my professional life requires daily use of Chinese, I still really miss being in the hustle bustle of China, surrounded by potential conversations with all sorts of people from all walks of life. I particularly miss hearing local dialect, which I find so much more rewarding than the rather stark requirements of professional putonghua. I've actually started considering signing up for some speaking courses online until we can go back to China, just to open a dialogue back up.
    2 points
  22. This could be a factor. I am probably just missing out on that community that I had before the pandemic. A lot of it went online and I just couldn't get into it anymore. But now that things are coming back I'll keep my eyes peeled.
    2 points
  23. That's great, I'm already rewatching Bleach now thanks to you. Sad knowing that the series falls apart after Soul Society Arc, but too damn nostalgic. These are perfect.
    2 points
  24. A lot of people use Hello Talk app. If all fails and you don't mind spending a bit of money you might want to consider Italki and find some community teachers who would normally charge a lot cheaper than professional teachers (some charge as little as 10 USD per hour) and you can just book "conversation lessons" with them on top of other more structured class.
    2 points
  25. Do people in China and Hong Kong really mind giving directions in the age of smartphones? When I see people in my city looking at a map or standing at a corner peering at their phone, I actively seek them out to ask if they need directions. I never hesitate to ask random people on the street for directions (and they always help me), and wouldn't in China either. It usually takes less than half a minute, they get to feel good about their knowledge and helping someone and I get closer to where I'm going. I used to always ask bus drivers to 报站 and they always did. Now I wonder if they
    2 points
  26. I love that effect, happened with a Chinese drama for me. I would get 20 minutes in to an episode and suddenly my brain would whisper "oh hey, just FYI this is in Chinese, I noticed you forgot" and it was the strangest sensation for my brain to suddenly become cognisant that it was hearing Chinese and not English.
    2 points
  27. I'm not very good with the technical terms but these were what I was hinting at. Thank you once again for helping out.
    1 point
  28. 离合词 like:吵架、打仗、洗澡🛁、担心 because xi is 轻声
    1 point
  29. Check their official website: Download apps
    1 point
  30. xiaomi store you can download apk There are many, like 现代汉语词典 there are HK traditional version
    1 point
  31. I'm also quite amazed to read some of the comments saying people don't like Chinese coming up in conversation. Here in the UK it feels like there is more of a collective shame (maybe too strong a word to describe it) that most of us are brought up as monolingual English speakers. When people find out I speak Chinese their eyes often light up and they might say something like 'I've always wanted to learn a language'.
    1 point
  32. When I was first learning Chinese and going back and forth a lot between Texas and the Chinese Mainland, I made a point of saying a few words to a newly arrived Dr. Wen who was working in my hospital, but in a different department. I rolled out a couple of my best ice-breaker phrases that I had learned for "getting-to-know-you" situations. He was clearly puzzled, but replied in Chinese with something appropriate. Then followed with, "But of course I'm actually from Burma." His family 姓温 had been part of a Chinese diaspora to Burma in the late 19th century. Made the same mistake a few months la
    1 point
  33. 1 point
  34. Actually there is a carpenter whose surname is 卫 in the first chapter. I don't know whether the whole 卫 family are carpenters, but I am sure that 卫老三 is a carpenter. He forces his third daughter to marry 白嘉轩.
    1 point
  35. Agree with @antony -- Cut my teeth on Chinese Breeze and Mandarin Companion. Why go with some sort of odd-ball, off-brand nonsense? Stick with the winners. I guess my advice would be different if someone is offering to give you those (the ones to which you linked.) "Make the procurement process easy" is advice number two. Don't want to get delayed, diverted and derailed by a "resource hunt." If you have something handy, use it. Start now. Don't let finding the ideal materials be an excuse to procrastinate.
    1 point
  36. I have gone through all Boya books up until the 1st advanced one and can provide some clarity. Only the beginner Boya series (初级 I and II - green colored books) come with a workbook. In the quasi-intermediate series (准中级 I and II - blue coloured books) the workbook has been integrated into the textbook. From intermediate (purple coloured books) onwards there are no more workbook style chapters and how the series is built up changes significantly. I still find the Boya series one of the most in-depth series which does not stop at 5000 words and consideres HSK 6 / 5000 words just abo
    1 point
  37. I feel your pain caused by the gap between graded readers and real novels. I experienced the same problem. To remedy it, I turned to children's books, in particular the kind that includes pinyin--not necessarily because I needed the pinyin, but because I think the presence of pinyin is an indication of reading/vocabulary level for children. I remember I read a book about Chinese myths, and so many words that I learned from that book have recurred in other written works. It was extremely helpful. I wish I could tell you the exact name and publisher, but it's sitting in a box somewhe
    1 point
  38. Currently there is no chinese restourant in my city, i have two friends from interpals, but they did not have time for a video call. Do you have any websites that could be helpful in this area?
    1 point
  39. It says 鑒定 ("appraised") in an slightly more archaic form of the first character with the 金 radical, then there's a smaller 京 below, presumably the office where it happened bu can't read the rest. Star makes you think China but maybe that's a Japanese variant as second part of jian is simplified, will go and check. Then the place might be 京都 Kyoto. https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/鑑#Japanese
    1 point
  40. A 5-years later bump... the series is still on youtube (as a playlist at least). Also, there's a slightly easier way to DL youtube content these days... just go to the URL bar in the browser where it says (for example): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PC3DmhI-3tU ...and type "pp" immediately after "youtube" but before the "." and then hit return. This tool also has an option to DL MP3 audio only.
    1 point
  41. I don't understand the question. Can you give some examples? I'm assuming you don't mean the literal words "什么什么"?
    1 point
  42. One thing to add to the above is find some language partners. Chinese live in so many countries, there is a good chance you can find someone. You help them with English, they help you with Chinese. This said, initially this will be difficult because it took me a very long time to develop reasonable conversation skills. However, short calls to practice language could help keep you motivated. My Chinese friends are a chief source of motivation for me. Also, most Chinese want to help foreigners learn their language (however, as in any country, only some know how to do this well
    1 point
  43. I'm reviving this thread as BFI Southbank is screening all his films throughout July and I went to see 6 of them. I'm almost certain I probably have watched some of his 90's stuff because one of my friends said I watched them with her but since I can't remember anything about them, it just felt like a first time watch. My favourite is definitely Chungking Express and In the Mood for Love, followed closely by Happy Together and Fallen Angels and then 2046 and Days of Being Wild. After watching Chungking Express I couldn't help thinking that Amelie must be somehow inspired by Chunki
    1 point
  44. Hi! The LLN Chrome add-on adds computer generated audio to your cards.
    1 point
  45. Self-employed in the UK here, and the bank's never asked for anything but tax records (SA302s) and bank statements. I don't have payslips to show them, and while I've sent out many invoices, I've never got one back stamped 'paid' or anything.
    1 point
  46. Good question. A colleague of mine from Canada had some type of global roaming that worked in China (3 years ago). He could literally upload pictures he took standing on the Great Wall to his Facebook. I think he said it was a special Apple deal that allows for global roaming (but do not quote me on that). Since I am an Android user did not follow up on this.
    1 point
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