Jump to content
Chinese-forums.com
Learn Chinese in China

Featured

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/14/2021 in all areas

  1. Update: I took a 2 months break from Chinese, but now I finally finished all HSK 3 lessons (approx. 1500). It is by far the biggest section of TCB. I had completed about 25% of them already in 2020. The audio per lesson is about 2 min, so there are ~3000 minutes (50 hours) of listening. Here the statistics (known word count relative to HSK 2.0 (2010-2021)): Words: Total 261.963 Known 179.557 Percent Known 68,54% Unknown 82.406 Percent Unknown 31,46% Unique 10.712 Known 2.468 Percent Known 23,04% Unknown 8.244 Percent Unknown 76,96% Characters: Unique 2.785 Here the statistics for all lessons HSK 1-3 all combined: Total words 382.650 Unique words 11.759 Unique characters 2.930 I noticed I am picking up more when I watch Chinese TV dramas and even though I only read about 30-40% of the texts of the lessons, my reading speed and character recognition also improved significantly. OK, let's tackle HSK 4 lessons
    7 points
  2. It's about time for a little vacation from studying. I have been cramming vocabulary since the beginning of this year, and in that time I have managed to more than double my vocabulary, acquiring nearly 8,000 new words and reading six different books along the way -- my first books ever. I'm quite pleased with my progress! 😁 But even the best of us can fall victim to burnout -- and I would know, because it's happened to me before. That's why I'm taking two-ish weeks off from all things Chinese. I'm making this post just to remind everyone to take some time every now and again. A little break here and there does wonders for staving off burnout.
    6 points
  3. Would love to know how they did this, especially if any from the UK. I started a China-based job in January, with every expectation that I'd be able to get back there within a few months after jumping through a few extra hoops. Suffice to say, that still hasn't happened, because I couldn't get a PU letter due to a technicality, and they haven't updated the vaccine rules in months, with no indication of when if ever they'll be brought in line with common sense. I'm fully vaccinated with Moderna, but that means nothing because it's not Chinese-developed. Meanwhile, my girlfriend has no way of leaving the country, even temporarily, due to the quarantine requirements and the demands of her job. It blows my mind that I haven't seen my girlfriend in almost 2 years and have literally no way of knowing (like, not even a single clue) when I'll be able to see her next. And I know I'm not the only one in a similar situation, as just the other day I heard about a friend of a friend in the same boat.
    4 points
  4. I have been having some interesting debates with my British friends here about all the big moves in China lately. Clearly all these changes are prelude to the party’s common prosperity drive, which was revealed by Xi himself last month. But I disagree with them that Xi’s common property agenda is equivalent to Maoism. While the socialist term common prosperity indeed came from Mao, the following generations of party leaders has actually taken widely different approached to it. And their shift in policy mirrors China’s structural and economic transformation. To get a sense of future direction of travel, I also looked into the so-called “three stages of wealth distribution” 三次分配, a concept highlighted by the leadership recently and is expected to be used as a guiding principle for future policy implementation. Specifically, Zhejiang province 浙江省 was named a pilot zone for the common prosperity initiative. The provincial government there recently published a blueprint which one can potentially considers as Xi’s draft version of common prosperity in KPIs. It is no doubt a huge topic - I would like to share my piece here and have a productive debate, as I know many on this forum are long-time China watchers and have insightful perspectives. https://www.flyingsesame.com/chinas-long-march-to-common-prosperity/
    4 points
  5. Hi all, I'd like to introduce you to the Laowai's Unofficial Chengyu Guide, a searchable online database that includes not only the translation of the story behind Chinese idioms (if applicable), but also usage examples, English-language equivalents, origin details, and more. I currently have about 110 entries, and I add a few entries each week. I've included some screenshots for 人山人海 (rénshānrénhǎi),马马虎虎 (mǎmahūhu),凤毛麟角 (fèngmáolínjiǎo),and 沧海桑田 (cānghǎisāngtián) entries below. If you check out the website, know that you can enter characters, accented or unaccented pinyin, and English into the search bar (see the full usage guide here.) I hope people find this guide useful! -- I'm always open to constructive feedback, and also I'm taking requests if you'd like me to make an entry for a specific chengyu. You can reach out here or email me at [email protected]
    3 points
  6. This is really interesting - I stand by my comment from 2020. However, I actually paid for the online subscription earlier this year when there was a discount on. I did so because I was curious to see what the experience would be like learning Cantonese through Mandarin (my sentences deck in anki doesnt have this option)....and was also curious to learn a bit of Irish and brush up on my Hindi, seeing as it was included in the price. The latter two were more about scratching an itch, but I'm surprised to say I don't regret spending the money to use the online platform for learning Cantonese (even though I have the audio in an Anki deck already). One thing I've really enjoyed is NOT grading myself correct/incorrect as on Anki (although let me know if switching this off is possible, I would love that). I set the software to listening only, then just shadow sentences on the 'recording' page until I'm happy. Then I just move on, and won't see the sentence again until Glossika decides its been too long since I've seen it (regardless of how I performed). I aim for 75 reviews a day, with 5-10 new sentences introduced each day. The result is stress-free, guilt-free learning, with phrases running through my head all day. If you're willing to spend the money, its a good investment. That being said, I still think there are plenty of equally excellent cheaper/free options available, but they might require a little more tweaking to get working how you want them.
    3 points
  7. Hey Chinese-Forums! This is me after two and a half years of learning, going through around a dozen of books, +500 class hours, and hundreds of conversations with Chinese friends. https://youtu.be/ZB6nXEVCiEU Any questions, please let me know!
    3 points
  8. Hi, I haven't taken the formal HSK5 test but I regularly take practice tests to gauge my progress. I'm currently scoring about 62% correct on the whole test (I guess that should translate to a score of around 186 in the real test). (听力: 34/45, 阅读:25/45, 书写:3/10). 写作 is hard for me to score so I can only check the questions where you have to put the words in the correct order. The ways I have attempted to improve my score is firstly to always use a timer to alert me when the time is up. This has made me realize that the biggest problem I have is my reading speed. I just can't finish reading everything in the 阅读 section and I always leave a lot of questions unanswered as a result. A second problem is in recognizing vocabulary. There is a lot of vocab in the texts that I simply don't know and this slows me down and also can trick me into giving wrong answers. The same problem also affects the results in 听力. Even though I can understand pretty much everything said, I get busy trying to read the options in the multiple choice questions while listening to what is being said (and preferably between the questions but currently usually that's not enough time for me). So to improve this, I'm mainly concentrating on character recognition and reading speed through extensive reading and most recently by writing as much by hand as possible. I have an Anki deck with sentences and audio for them, I listen to the audio and write down what I hear before checking if I got it right. I have also done drills taking a text and timing my reading it over and over again trying to each time improve my time. But I believe in the end it boils down to word recognition and mostly in a sentence so I believe reading a lot and writing by hand the way I described are most likely ways to deepen the mental images I have of those words and also to get used to different ways they appear in different contexts, presumably leading to quicker reading speed. Extensive reading and my handwriting practice deck also take care of picking up new vocabulary and characters. I find SRS'ing vocabulary out of context unhelpful. I need them to be in sentences and I have good enough grasp of the characters that I know that listening to the sentences and writing them out is a natural step up from just reading the sentence and scoring the cards on whether or not I got the pinyin pronunciation right. I also don't really drill the sentences. I just write them once, leave the ones that have some difficult or interesting character or word in them in Anki for the time being, and then just delete the rest. The Mandarin Blueprint words in context decks are perfect for this since the sentences add new characters and words little by little and they have native recordings of the sentences. There is also a lot of repetition built into the sentences even without "Anki cramming".
    2 points
  9. Related to this, the FT reports that the US is about to reopen travel from Europe, but only for vaccinated travelers. Honestly you can't do much of anything fun in New York City at this point without showing proof of vaccination anyway, it's required to enter restaurants / bars / theaters / etc, but it's going to be an interesting test of the system because now every random little bar in the West Village is going to need to have a way to confirm that somebody from Estonia actually got their jab. It also sounds like there's a strong chance they'll be required for domestic travel soon as well; a quirk of US law is that it's way, way easier for the federal government to impose vaccine mandates on unambiguously national things like interstate airline travel than it is to impose them in places like schools that are regulated at the state / local level, so even though it'd be way easier logistically to improve vaccine rates by pushing them in schools / offices (and they're attempting to do that for the latter at least), legally speaking this is one of the few tools they have to incentivize reluctant people to get vaccinated. But basically the thrust of things here is that life is going to get progressively more limiting and inconvenient if you're not vaccinated, and even Fox News has polls suggesting that 2/3 of Americans agree with at least some level of vaccine mandates, so given that vaccines are extremely, extremely safe, even if you're convinced you don't need a vaccine it may be worth getting one anyway simply to avoid being constantly bothered about it. (if you don't trust mRNA then get an adenovirus vaccine like J&J or AZ; it's decades-old technology, may be less effective than mRNA but it still "counts" for purposes of vaccine mandates)
    2 points
  10. I also really enjoyed watching 沉默的真相! ahah I had exactly the same feeling, I thought it could be a last ditch attempt to save the face of the police force after spending the whole series stressing how corrupt it is! Another series I watched recently is 全职高手, not a masterpiece by any means and the characters development leaves a lot to be desired, but a relaxing and "feel good" show that I would recommend, especially if you are into videogames. Now I just started watching 乔家的儿女 , the story of 5 children of the 乔 family growing up in a desperately poor environment and helping each other out. The first episode seems really good and it's available on youtube. On another note, I'm trying to find a mandarin-dubbed version of the Detective Conan with subtitles (preferably simplified). I checked the various youku, IQIYI etc. but only seem to find either japanese audio with chinese subtitles or chinese audio without subtitles...can anyone help here?
    2 points
  11. In case anybody here has a question or two that they'd like to ask. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rcDuh5lSFMQ
    2 points
  12. Sorry, @inv -- I'm through trying to advise you or explain things to you. (Unfollow your content.)
    2 points
  13. Yes, yes, yes. That's what we have all been telling you for several weeks now. Multiple threads, identical advice.
    2 points
  14. China won't let you enter without proof of vaccination. You also get 3 weeks quarantine at a hotel at your expense, and a further 1 week quarantine at home. They also are not allowing tourist visas, business visas, etc. to enter. Only residence permits.
    2 points
  15. Look at the abandoned second round of simplified characters for more common but not standard simplifications. https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/bb/Second_Chinese_Character_Simplification_Scheme_(Draft).pdf
    2 points
  16. Oh, come now. What an overly literal, borderline rude response. Here's some actual help: https://resources.allsetlearning.com/chinese/grammar/A1_grammar_points#Parts_of_Speech
    2 points
  17. If she only heard it once but doesn't speak/understand the language, this could potentially mean nothing especially if she misheard it and/or mispronounce it when replicating the pronunciation. Fortunately Chinese has a lot of homonyms so you can pick a character that sounds similar that has good meaning.
    2 points
  18. I have finished The Long Night 沉默的真相 it is soooo good. Highly recommend it! Also there were a few points that didn't get explained in the drama but afterwards I saw this YouTube channel where she explains some of them. This YouTube video is a spoiler, wouldn't recommend if you plan to also read the book https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ihte67AQsIk If I'm going to nitpick, towards the end where some of the authorities keep talking about their duties, integrity etc I find it a bit weird and stilted like I was in a classroom getting some moral lessons or something. It doesn't add anything to the drama other than making it weird.
    2 points
  19. I think your understanding of what 草书 is needs some reassessment. Yes, in English the point of 'cursive' is what you have stated, but the English concept of 'cursive' =/= 草书. We use the translation 'cursive' for 草书 for convenience (as a rough equivalent), and then 'semi-cursive' for 行书. However, sometimes you will see terms like 'Chinese shorthand' being used for 草书. This is because 草书 is a system of writing that seeks to achieve two things: speed in writing and effortlessness in artistic production. It is ultimately not concerned with legibility per se, but rather uses often arbitrary signs to 'point' to what the character might be (in a similar way to Western shorthand systems). The bulk of the comprehension work is put on the reader - do they know what the arbitrary signs are? Have they learnt by heart the phrases and poems that are being quoted? The second important point that needs to be addressed is the fact that 草书 did not evolve from 楷书, in fact the opposite is likely true. 草书 existed far earlier than 楷书, and is a rendering of an earlier 章草/隶书 script from the Han dynasty. This means it can never 'reproduce' the strokes of 楷书, as these strokes were decided at a much later stage. Instead of seeing the goal of 草书 as a rendering of 楷书, we should see it as a mature system in its own right. If you study it at any length you will find far more divergent forms than those shown in this thread - forms that often point to an earlier history of 汉字, before they became solidified in their 楷书 forms. In a recent thread @OneEyes recommendation of 十七贴 was mentioned on the recommended list of books to study for understanding how to write 'cursive characters'. The value of this collection of texts is immense, but it must be remembered that 王羲之s letters were written first and foremost to display his learning and artistic ability to his friends, not because he wanted to communicate really quickly and with ease. 智永千字文 is a much better recommendation from the list, but again, it is teaching artistic forms, and you will come across plenty of seemingly random rules in this text too, just because the author seems to have thought a character would 'look nicer' written in a certain way. If you want a clearly laid out system, with obvious links to the 楷书 you are familiar with, neither of these texts will do you many favours (even 智永千字文 is not so useful, as many of the 楷书 forms are 异体字 popular in the Sui dynasty, reformed after its fall soon after this copybook entered into circulation). If this thread has ignited your interest, thats great - I suggest you read more about earlier character primers such as 急就章 or 仓颉篇. If it has made you reassess 草书 as a practical tool for learning Chinese, thats fine too - I would recommend you study 行书, which is a system that developed out of 楷书, and serves the purpose of writing 楷书 without writing all the strokes. Some feel that it is not quick enough, though, and so they habitually borrow from the 草书 system to increase speed - and thus confusion arises! Take what you want and try not to get confused by the rest - be assured that it looks entirely different because it is an entirely different system designed to serve a different purpose.
    2 points
  20. I have voiced my support for glossika in the past, but that was before they moved to an online subscription model, and was just a company that offered mass sentence packages. I downloaded and have worked from a mass sentence deck in anki for years now to great success, and it would seem to me that is for the very reasons you have said put you off the online model. I can suspend cards when I'm happy with them having entered my long term memory, push cards to the front constantly for those that aren't going in. I often find that about 1 in 10 sentences doesn't go in, and I need to give it a bit of special attention, eg, adding some mnemonic, picture etc. to help out with the audio, and the glossika online system just doesn't have that functionality from what ive seen. In conclusion, if you can get your hands on an glossika chinese audio package somewhere, stick it into anki or work through it with workaudiobook/similar software, you'll see where the praise for glossika once came from. Failing that, there are some decent free alternatives in the free shared decks on anki.
    2 points
  21. Very much so! Here's an excerpt from an answer I wrote on Quora recently (answering a different question, but it's mostly still relevant): --------------- Bronze and oracle bone script coexisted, for one. We have a ton of examples of Shang bronze script. Shang bronze script is often more pictographic than oracle bone script, because it’s easier to include a lot of detail when you’re casting characters in bronze versus scratching them onto tortoise plastrons or ox scapula. 何, for example, depicted a person carrying a weapon (a 戈 or dagger-axe): The oracle bone version is less vivid, though the main elements are all still there: Notice what a huge difference the medium makes. Similarly, brush writing coexisted with, and actually pre-dated, small seal script. The earliest extant examples of brush writing that we have are from a collection called 侯馬盟書 The Covenant Inscriptions of Houma, from the late Spring and Autumn and early Warring States periods, pre-dating small seal script by quite a bit. But scholars believe brush writing existed even as early as the Shang period. We just don’t have any examples. Here’s a comparison of a few different media from the same time period. This is 訶(歌) from the Warring States period, on bronze (left), jade (center), and brush on bamboo (right): You can see the connections between the three forms, but they’re visually quite different, right? Now that I’ve shown how much a change in medium can affect a character visually, let’s compare small seal script (left) with the brush writing of the Qin period (right), when small seal script was standardized (i.e., these forms are contemporary): And now the same character in Han clerical script: As before, you can see the connections between all three forms of 親 here, but the two brush forms bear much more similarity to each other, despite the significant time gap, than either of them does to seal script. --------------- Here are some more examples of Qin brush writing compared to small seal script (from 張守中《睡虎地秦簡文字編》): Again, you can see the connection pretty clearly, but there are quite a few differences.
    1 point
  22. Okay, I started with this! This is what I've got: https://laowaichengyuguide.com/allbytimeperiod.php (I added the link to the main page as well). This actually turned out to be a lot more difficult than I anticipated, so please let me know what you think/if you have suggestions! Basically, I discovered that some chengyu were created long after the events that chengyu are based upon actually happened. For example, the chengyu 乱七八糟 (luàn qī bā zāo) is from about a century ago, but it's based on events from almost a thousand years ago. So, I had to decide whether I wanted to sort based on when the events actually took place or based on when the chengyu itself was written, and I ended up choosing the former. In hindsight, looking back at your post, you seem to be more interested in the era in which the chengyu actually came from. I'll do that too (and do the animal/historical/etc tagging), but I'm going to take a detour first and see if I can figure out how to allow people to filter by a drop-down tab on the All Entries page. Having to create separate pages for each query is rather tedious and inefficient. Not sure how long that'll take -- I'll update here when I finally tackle it. Okay, I'll put this on my to-do list
    1 point
  23. I find myself in a similar situation. I got a Chinese government scholarship and should have been allowed in China by last year, yet the coronavirus happened and I'm still here. Taking online classes sucks and there is a time difference of 6 hours between my country and China. I haven't seen my girlfriend in almost 2 years and she can't come either. Shit sucks, but at least we aren't alone in this. 加油.
    1 point
  24. I know the feeling! So far no one in my family has met my son, and he's nearly 2 years old now! Since then, my wife is now pregnant with our second. It's looking like the next time I see my family back in the UK, we would have gone from no kids to two kids! I keep telling my family I'll definitely come back for Christmas with my son, but it's virtually impossible. Most Brits I knew left the country when COVID came, so trying to get a British passport for my son is a nightmare as there's no one to vouch that it's really him and sign his photo. If I can find someone, the application takes 3 months anyway! The other option was to get a Chinese passport and a British visa, but China has halted all new applications for passports, except for people studying or working abroad (as they wouldn't be coming back into the country any time soon.)
    1 point
  25. Several recent threads have discussed how it's "impossible" to get into China right now. Yes, it's very difficult, but I'd like to add that here in Hangzhou we've had 3 or 4 new teachers join us, mostly (I think) from outside China. Certainly one from Malaysia (whose embassy was completely closed for several months) and another from Pakistan, if I'm not mistaken. They had to quarantine for 28 days (!) but they did get here in the end. So, it's not impossible to enter China for work, but it's still a huge challenge. Tourist and student visas on the other hand are still very unlikely to be approved from what we've all been reading.
    1 point
  26. Thank you for sharing the article. I completely agree with you about vaccination.
    1 point
  27. By "trip" it sounds like you mean for travel purposes, which as far as I know isn't possible at all right now, regardless of vaccination status or where you're traveling from. It will probably be quite a while (perhaps a year or more) before it's possible again, and even longer (perhaps several years) until it's possible without a vaccine. Is there any specific reason why? There's a very broad medical consensus that vaccines are safe, and most of them are halal too.
    1 point
  28. 道艺!我当然记得!We played werewolves in Chinese online and you also spoke at this GoEast/SmartShanghai event. And thanks. I actually wonder about tones and pronunciation. Many times I don't consciously remember it. Yeah, 买 and 卖 I can remember, but 北京 and 背景, right now I don't know how to pronounce them differently. I need to check Pleco. How did you learn this? Do you consciously learn the strokes, or do you speak it a lot, or listen a lot, and learn it more by heart? Do you understand my question like this? 😬 I'll say hi to Lynn~!
    1 point
  29. Funny that you mention this -- I was actually thinking of doing exactly this. What's given me pause is that some 成语 are based on the events of other 成语, so if I wanted my tagging to be properly chronological, I'd have to get so granular as to research the actual date/year in which the 成语 took place. (For example, to understand why the general 廉颇 is angry in the 负荆请罪 story, you have to have read 完璧归赵 first.) This is problematic because some 成语 don't even have dates, and because research for those that do will take quite a bit of time. Granted, I could be a bit less fastidious about it and just group everything by dynasty, but I didn't know whether people would get frustrated when they realized 成语 on the list weren't as chronological as advertised. What do you think? I can definitely do option two — just group by dynasty — if you're still interested, but unfortunately I don't think I'm ready to take on option one right now. I also wanted to do this! I'll give it a shot this weekend. Another person made this request elsewhere! I don't personally find value in it -- I've figured that people would be using my website to look up chengyu that they've stumbled across elsewhere, so knowing the frequency wouldn't be particularly relevant -- so maybe there's something I'm missing. Can you explain how this would be used? Licenses for audio recordings aren't cheap, and unfortunately, I have approximately two dollars to my name (and I'd like my site to be accessible to everyone, so I don't want to charge users/have ads). Fortunately, you can listen to some great audio recordings on Pleco until I get to a point where I can add my own I thought about allowing submissions -- it's going to take me forever to make substantial progress -- but it actually takes longer to assure the quality of someone else's translations than it does for me to do my own, and my time is super limited. I hope you can understand! Thanks so much for the feedback, suggestions, and support! I really appreciate it!
    1 point
  30. Beginner student asks how to say 'the weather is beautiful today'. MFW gets recommended to quote 岳阳楼记...
    1 point
  31. I just finished 圈子圈套 2, and 洪钧 leveled up too much. He's so over-powered he doesn't run into much trouble anymore. In book 1, at least he gets knocked around in the first half of the book. I found the segments with 邓汶 (PhD friend of 洪钧 who returned to China from America) and 小薛 (the newbie) more interesting because they were still acted like a fish out of water. They bumbled around and got in themselves in bad situations. In contrast, 洪钧 is written like 诸葛亮, and a few instructions from him is enough to solve almost every situation. It's hard to tell overall if 洪钧 is doing better than 俞威 (as of the end of book2). 洪钧 is certainly a nicer guy and seems to be a better problem solver. But I get impression 俞威's company is bigger and he manages to play the 老外 like a fiddle, while 洪钧 does not, and that's enough to counter 洪钧. I wonder what other people's impressions are. Language-wise, I found it slightly harder than Book 1, but not too much. On the plus side, it seems to have even more modern office / business vocab to harvest. I'll be reading Book 3 after a few other books in the pipeline.
    1 point
  32. 2. "too" applied to the verb "sent" (I arranged a bigger gift to be delivered, in addition to the smaller one I'm handing over now) --> I *SENT* you a gift too. --> 送了一个礼物给你了我也。 3. "too" applied to the indirect object "you" (I sent your parents a gift) --> I sent *YOU* a gift too. --> 你我也送了个礼物。 4. "too" applied to the direct object "gift" (I sent a thank-you card earlier) --> I sent you a *GIFT* too. --> 礼物我也送了你一个。
    1 point
  33. John McWhorter, a linguist, has a long plug for Glossika out in the NY Times: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/09/14/opinion/learn-foreign-language.html I tried it out. Yuck! The sentences were very weird and I didn't like the way they start from the English. I'd rather start with Chinese input.
    1 point
  34. 1 point
  35. Verb: 动词 (dong1ci2) Noun (subject): 名词 (ming2ci2)
    1 point
  36. It's definitely not Mandarin. Could potentially be Cantonese in any of the various romanization systems that use "ch" for [tɕʰ] or [tɕ]. "Chi" ("ci" in Jyutping romanization) could be one of these characters: https://cantonese.org/search.php?q=ci+&searchAlphaEN=false&searchAlphaPY=false . "Loi" could be one of these: https://cantonese.org/search.php?q=loi+&searchAlphaEN=false&searchAlphaPY=false , most likely 萊 as I think that would be the most common in girls' names. I've deliberately left those URLs as text to copy rather than hyperlinks, because there's a weird bug that makes them show different results when opened from a link (?!🤯) Does her mother have no idea as to what the name means? Or which Chinese language (Cantonese or a different one) it comes from?
    1 point
  37. Among the photos I took in Zhengzhou in 1975, I have two shots of what is presumably an anti-capitalist or anti-foreigner poster, together with people looking unhappy about me photographing it. I can remember nothing about the situation - people were normally very friendly and pleased to see us. I can't really read this - e.g. I see that Wang Kangnian is a proper name and he has a brother, but I would be grateful if someone could type out what of the text is legible (my Chinese is really ropy). And what would the overall meaning and context of this poster be?
    1 point
  38. Here's what I could read of the first panel: 事情发生在二十年前 解放日报有登X 旧上海有个王康年 十六岁就鬼混在花花世界 来X特务刺客刘仲英 安插在上海大惠电台 充当新闻报告员 X就一张牛皮嘴 招摇X骗吹牛拍马样样全 x where it wasn't clear. Did a search on Li Zhongying and there were some stories about a traitor agent in Shanghai by that name in the 1940s but not much detail on a quick look.
    1 point
  39. The first chapter has too many characters I can't quite read, so I'm skipping that one, but here is the rest. What an amazing photo you have there. I'm not sure if the content of the story is something that happened locally, or supposedly happened locally, or is a story from elsewhere, but the illustrations and calligraphy are not something standard. 2. 在电台勾搭上女广播员杨惠倩 --她父亲是巡捕房里的包打听 摇身变为汉奸特务乘龙婿 王康年飞黄腾达有时机 3. 越剧名伶马樟花 筹为行头找店家 王康年热情做掮客 吹得满嘴流油*天花 4. 一笔巨款骗到手 赁房聘人宴酒肉 金漆招牌挂门首 “大康行”老板真派头! 5. 王康年的哥哥王康庆 当年在医院学过生意连 兄弟俩偷天换日制假药 玉米面制成阿斯匹林 商标装璜玻璃瓶 各种假药害人命
    1 point
  40. @abcdefg Aw! Thank you for the concern. It was a mad time, literally... 9 years ago now! So glad to be back 😁
    1 point
  41. I'm in the UK, so it sounds like I'm in luck! Thanks.
    1 point
  42. Can I chip in? I went to China to teach at a regional uni, with a lovely big bag of meds and my GP's express blessing. I'd had depression for a few years. That uni had/has a great international teacher liaison guy so there were very little issues. I loved it there and my fellow foreign teachers and lovely Chinese students. I ended up having a breakdown while I was out there in the New Year break- first time with suicidal ideation- I was thinking of ending it all by jumping from my 5th floor flat. I contacted my GP who said come home asap. My liaison couldn't have been more helpful- even offering to take me to the local hospital which I declined as I didn't know the system. Anyhow, I got myself on a flight home (thank god for a refundable ticket). It took me 2 years before I was well enough to even work 2 mornings a week as a volunteer, 8 years in total before I could work again full time. Serious depression that took years to sort out the meds. Bit of a horror story, despite having a great set up in China. Would I go back again, in a heart beat- I love China- but I know that at the moment, only a couple of months would be a safe amount of time max. I wouldn't bet on a full year. If you can't say that you'd be able to get yourself home safely on a refundable flight, definitely don't go.
    1 point
  43. September's a perfectly good time to list my 2021 goals, right? Right? I've maintained around HSK 5 level for the last few years (completed HSK5 标准课程, loosely maintained with Anki) and finally, finally want to tick it off before the year's out. To this end, the main goal/aim is: Pass the HSK 5 with 200+ Completely 'learn' all HSK 5 vocabulary from the HSK 5 Skritter deck (in my case, re-learning forgotten ones). 100 reviews/day and 20 'new words'/day. Currently 52% down. Practice HSK 5 reading materials/graded books until consistently scoring 80+ on the reading section. Create an Anki deck of sentences showing weaker grammar points in use. Write on Lang-8, and/or other services if better. Maintain 1hr/week lessons on Italki with a teacher. Although some of those bullet points may chop and change depending on how progress and feedback, I'm happy with that for now. I'm hoping some sage advice and wisdom from those who've crushed the exam might also help me along the way! Good luck everyone for your respective goals - 加油!
    1 point
  44. [Take the following with a big pinch of salt] In theory at every level of Chinese government there is a parallel split between the 党 and政, between the Party (党) and the ‘State’ (政). The Party decides policy and the State executes it. The 党 operates through committees, headed by a Secretary. The 政 operates though jobs that sound more familiar in English translation, such as Premier, Governor, Mayor. Although in theory they operate in parallel, in practice the holder of the top 党 job is senior to the holder of the top 政 job of the same level. For example Chairman of the party versus Premier of the country. And so on, all the way down. In the word 党政, the 党 comes before the 政. So at each level of government it’s the party committee that’s key. And the secretary of that committee is the main guy. But it’s not a completely clean break between 党 and 政: whoever has the top 政 job will typically also hold the number two job (e.g. deputy-secretary) in the 党 committee, where he is subordinate only to the secretary of that committee. Administrative levels The rough sequence below National level is Provincial -> Municipal -> County -> Township. Provincial: 省 Municipal: 市 County: 县 Township: 乡 (I guess then it’s 村?) And the principles generally apply throughout: the various committees (委) are 省委、市委、县委、乡委. Those committees’ secretaries (书记) are 省委书记、市委书记、县委书记、乡委书记. On the ‘政-side’ the top jobs all have a 长, so: 省长 (Governor)、市长 (‘Mayor’)、县长、乡长. Municipalities: 地级市 (shortened to 市) I had lots of trouble working out what a municipality is! And this is where most of the action in《秘书长》takes place. Official Chinese sources seem to translate 地级市 as “municipality”. The most accurate translation, word-for-word, of 地级市 is “regional-level municipality”. English-language sources like Wikipedia call them prefectures or prefecture-level municipalities. A 地级市 is a region “地” and its main city “市” that have been brought together to form an administrative entity. There are 293 of them: most cities you can think of in China (but not Beijing or Shanghai) are likely to be the city in a 地级市. They seem to take the name of their main city. So when you say “I’m just driving into Suzhou now” you’re probably referring to the city called Suzhou. But there is also a municipality called Suzhou, and it’s made up of both the city Suzhou and the surrounding area. So most of a Chinese municipality could in fact be very rural. A municipality is split into counties (县) and/or districts (区). They are below the municipality in the leadership hierarchy. Government/control of a municipality The Party runs the municipality though the Party committee. Municipality is 市 Committee is 委员会 Municipal Party Committee is 市委员会, i.e. 市 + 委员会. But it’s usually abbreviated to 市委. So: 市委 shì-wěi n. municipal Party committee The committee is headed by a secretary. Secretary is 书记. So: 市委书记 is the municipal Party secretary, i.e. the most important person in the municipality. On the ‘政-side’ in a municipality, the highest position is the 长 of the 市, so: 市长 shìzhǎng n. mayor. By convention whoever is 市长 will simultaneously be deputy secretary of the municipality Party committee too (there may be more than one deputy secretary though). 市委副书记 = 市委 (municipality+committee) + 副 (deputy) + 书记 (secretary). Committees These committees are themselves run by their “standing committees” where the real decisions are taken. I’m not sure if people distinguish much between the two in real life: obviously the secretary of the overall committee is also secretary of the standing committee too, etc etc. The ‘standing’ basically means permanent (as opposed to a committee that’s set up to organise one particular thing and later disbands). (常务gets translated in dictionaries as “day-to-day business; routine”, but here the 常perhaps comes from 常设 chángshè attr. standing; permanent.) They seem to have around 10 to 12 members. 常务委员会 chángwù wěiyuánhuì n. standing committee 常委会 chángwěihuì = the standard abbreviation for standing committee 常委 cháng-wěi = n. member of standing committee So, a municipal committee standing committee member would be a 市委常委
    1 point
  45. Wow. This is the original ask_weasal. I spelled weasal wrong on purpose. It’s been 15 years since this post. An update? Well...I’m still in China. Moved to Shanghai over 10 years ago as someone on the forum suggested. Married and have two children. I believe I’m less stupid(that’s up for debate). I ended up just changing my passport. Thank goodness nothing bad happened. What’s ironic is that the American friend who did that in 2006 is now dead from a tragic accident. It happened a few days ago. In fact...over a 10 year period he and his two other brothers also died in tragic accidents. Starting with his first brother that died in 2011. Then his second brother in 2018. Don’t believe me? Look this name up: Stephen Rome. It’s a pretty unique name. You’ll find the story. A real story of final destination. When I read back on what I wrote. I cannot believe I was this stupid. Thanks guys for helping me see through my stupidity. Anyway, rest In peace Stephen Rome. Randall
    1 point
  46. 茶叶大国咖啡文化崛起的意思就是茶叶大国的咖啡文化的崛起。 English: The meaning of 茶叶大国咖啡文化崛起 is: 茶叶大国的咖啡文化的崛起。 Please note the two added 的.
    1 point
  47. How lovely! The most popular English translation of the 成语 ‘ 顺其自然 ‘ seems to be "Go with the flow". Alternatively, it could be "to let nature take its course" (I like this one better in this case). I think I'd also use 'Mother Nature' for 大自然
    1 point
  48. the wandering earth 2019 is a good movie I think, or at least is not a bad one It looks like armagedon or any 90's american sci-fi movie but with chinese flags everywhere
    1 point
  49. These are not the only two choices. Popup dictionaries have the problem where they are so convenient that the brain decides it's more convenient to rely on them rather than try to remember the word, and so your brain outsources that effort to the popup dictionary rather than make an effort to remember them. It also encourages a phenomenon where you encounter a word you don't know and rather than stopping and breaking down the character and looking at how its written and wondering what it means given the context and a whole host of other things, instead you skip over it to look at the definition in English (or your native language) and move on. Yes, there might be some words you pay more attention to, but the bulk of them are just look up and move on because to do otherwise would be to interrupt reading fluency. Which leads to spending little to no time on the very words and characters you should be spending the most time on, and in the worst case scenarios where you are reading material too far beyond your level, it can essentially lead to reading a poor English translation using Chinese word order. The other detrimental effect is that it destroys your confidence in knowing a word and so you look it up 'just to check', and you 'get it right' so you move on without realising that confidence in knowing a word is just as important as knowing the meaning and the pronunciation, and you really should have stopped and spent a few seconds affirming your confidence in the word so that the next time you come across you don't need to look it up 'just to check'. Both of these things are lessened when a dictionary lookup has some amount of friction. Something that gets you to stop and think, and pay attention to the word you didn't understand. This can be a paper dictionary, but handwriting lookup on Pleco also works great (the former is what I used for the first several years of learning China and the latter being what I've used for the last 12 years). The most important thing though is to revise words you've looked up and cement them in your mind. This is Pleco's killer feature IMO. You look it up in a dictionary and it's trivial to then go through and drill yourself on all the words you've looked up, and that's what keeps your level moving forward.
    1 point
  50. While some of their stuff looks like it might be good, this kind of ad copy puts me off to be honest.
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...