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Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/07/2021 in all areas

  1. Hello everyone, I hope you're doing well. About a year ago I posted here about an ongoing documentary project I'm doing about the left behind children in China. I shared a short documentary that I made in Hubei province, and was very happy to read your comments and see your interest. You can find the old post with some details about the phenomenon right here: https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/59742-a-short-documentary-about-a-chinas-left-behind-children/ And the first short film is available here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G_Iy6mRXfLI&t=26s I want to share
    5 points
  2. Although these inequalities exist, the Chinese government has been very effective in its messaging to the rural poor. Harvard's ASH study (2020) noted that during the last 20 years "Interestingly, more marginalized groups in poorer, inland regions are actually comparatively more likely to report increases in satisfaction." https://ash.harvard.edu/publications/understanding-ccp-resilience-surveying-chinese-public-opinion-through-time One interesting aspect is that the ASH study suggests the biggest changes for the rural poor happened before the tenure of President Xi. Yet the vil
    4 points
  3. Just finished 三体 earlier today. I finished it in exactly 30 days, which means I averaged about 10 pages a day (which takes me about an hour). In terms of difficulty, I must say it was far easier than I expected, I guess 草鞋湾 prepared me well! Some chapters were notably more difficult than others, leading me to skipping over the seemingly unimportant words at the cost of having a less clear understanding. Overall though, I feel I definitely understood and enjoyed it quite a bit. At the same time I learned tons of new vocabulary and have a noticeably much faster reading speed (a neat side effect
    4 points
  4. In my opinion 许三观卖血记 is the simplest and shortest of the 余华 novels (as a matter of fact It think It's the simplest non-graded book in Chinese I've ever been able to find so far...), I'm also probably about HSK5 and really enjoyed reading it, I'd recommend it!
    4 points
  5. Much better to wait a while.
    4 points
  6. New here and hoping to get to know you all, just began my journey into mandarin, mainly to learn how to play gucheng and guqin Have decided to sit HSK2 in June so lots of learning in a short space of time, work allowing :D. See you around
    3 points
  7. I've read all the comments. My contribution is this Anon100, watch this film, it's 8 minutes long. Nothing in comparison to lifetime tattoo. This could be the difference between looking great, and looking terrible. She is a Chinese teacher, and I think a lot of learners like her channel, and respect her. She knows western culture very well. Also google 'cheng yu', Chinese idioms (that are often ancient stories compacted into 4 characters, and have exact translations in English). You can find a 4 character long phrase, that works in both English and Ch
    3 points
  8. These concepts that you want to express are all two-part words. The tattoo would make much more sense if written this way: 和平 = peace 爱情 = love 健康 = health 繁荣 = prosperity Using the single characters, as in your original version, would look ignorant and wrong. It would be illiterate. It would brand you as someone who didn't care about the culture or the language, which I realize is definitely not your intent. Anyone who saw it years later would have to suppress a smile if they could read and understand Chinese. I would humbly suggest getting it done rig
    3 points
  9. An update, in case it's of interest or use to anyone. Last week, my daughter received her results from the January 2021 Dip Trans exam. Things didn't go too well as she failed both the general section, which she confident of passing, as well as the science specialist section, which she felt reasonably sure she'd passed. The literature specialist section, which she was pretty sure she had failed, she actually did pass - and, much to her surprise, received a distinction. (She's currently in her final year of a degree in English Literature and perhaps underrated her ability to write
    3 points
  10. I wouldn't say they are meaningless. Single characters like these are often used to depict certain meanings (for example the 福 character can be found anywhere, even though it could be considered a "half-word" in modern Chinese ). For the meanings they convey, I am no expert on this so I should probably let someone else answer. But if I were to make some guesses, 和 - peace/harmony 爱 - love 健 - healthy(??) 繁 - numerous(????) As for whether these actually make sense on their own enough to be used for a tattoo, I couldn't tell you. A Chinese person cou
    3 points
  11. I think it depends on what sort of feeling you're trying to give when you say it, but if your goal is to just simply express that meaning to someone, 今天是明天的昨天 would work fine. This could have some slightly more complex grammar like Jim posted. "tomorrow, today is already yesterday" or "tomorrow, today will become yesterday". Could you be more precise with the wording you're looking for?
    3 points
  12. Welcome! You've set out on an incredible journey.
    3 points
  13. I'm not jumping in here simply to be a smart-arse, but - the idea of "learning styles" e.g. visual learner etc, appears to be a myth - so, if what's working for you works, that's great, but if your sense of what should or should not work for you is being influenced by this false notion that you're ill-suited to one particular "learning style", you may be slightly holding yourself back unnecessarily.
    3 points
  14. I think you're no more than half right. For instance, if you had a "high flat tone" followed by a "falling and rising tone", then the latter would not 'fall to wherever it was last': it would be lower than the high flat tone that came before it. Or, consider four rising tones in a row: your interesting hypothesis would leave us at a super-high pitch on the last of the four! Yes, tones are expressed differently - at different pitches - depending on the tones of their neigbours in any string of speech. But as NanJingDongLu says, they are recognised as a given tone chiefly because of
    3 points
  15. I asked a native and they said 好心没好报. The translation given in Pleco is "get no thanks for one's good intentions". They also said this is their favourite of the translations given for hanging on your wall at home. If it's for a tattoo on your arm it's too long, so go with 善有善报.
    3 points
  16. Went well. I got a B+ with 79.4%. Little bit miffed as 79.5% would have been rounded up to 80% and an A-. To be fair, life got super busy and I didn't deserve an A- but would have been nice. Having read many of your posts over the last year, you would have absolutely smashed it. It was very much spoon-fed and wouldn't be worth it for you now that you are immersed in Mandarin on a day-to-day basis. Would be nice to have another Kiwi on here one day.... Nah, I'm in Hawkes Bay, 5 hours south of Auckland.
    3 points
  17. I just came across this blog article about teaching English vocabulary in secondary schools... but there are some interesting starting points for thinking about teaching and learning of vocab in general: https://scottthornbury.wordpress.com/2013/06/02/v-is-for-vocabulary-teaching/ 1. The Principle of Cognitive Depth: “The more one manipulates, thinks about, and uses mental information, the more likely it is that one will retain that information. In the case of vocabulary, the more one engages with a word (deeper processing), the more likely the word will be remembered f
    3 points
  18. I'm now conversational in Chinese after 2 and half years of study without traveling to China during this time. Immersion is something that you can create to some extent without being in the country. It is also something that you completely avoid even while living in the country. I also warmly recommend the All Japanese All the Time blog. That being said, my own best suggestion, that has helped me is; online tutors. If you can't have Chinese friends, talk to one at least 3 to 6 hours a week depending on your budget and tell them never to speak anything else than Chinese to you.
    2 points
  19. The UN demographics unit (usually incredibly accurate) seems to suggest China are on the quicker side when it comes to urbanization. I'm not schooled in statistics so if anyone wants to look at the data themselves here is a link.
    2 points
  20. And in Shona: Mangwana nhasi anenge ava nezuro
    2 points
  21. Anyone can check your HSK result if you give them your admission ticket number and the name you registered with. Just go to the Score box on chinesetest.cn and put them in, along with the code shown. Now, maybe this is common knowledge but it's news to me... it turns out that the result page then has a link at the bottom to "print" your certificate. (You might need to be logged in for this link to appear, I'm not sure.) The link says 打印成绩单 — print transcript. If you click the link a dialogue box will pop up, in Chinese. The button on the left pr
    2 points
  22. I recently discovered a new channel called 纯纯甘. Each video is a small 10-15 minute documentary, where the host follows a person living in Beijing around for a day. It's very much "a day in the life of a..." type thing. Although it only started uploading just this year, the channel already has over 25k subscribers, and I think its success is well deserved. So far there are 10 videos, featuring such people as a computer programmer, a hairdresser, a vet etc. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIs3-LcOCdpiGve6yu1-Fug/videos
    2 points
  23. Several options come to mind, pretty sure they’re all okay. First part, you could use 把 structure, and I believe that’s the most grammatically accurate option, or you could do it without. Don’t see a problem with 忘了 + 语言: 我的中文基本上都忘了 我把中文都忘了 / 忘光了 我的中文都搞忘记了 (not overly fond of this one, but I think it’s not wrong). Second part - not sure about the 想起来 in this context either, and I don’t like the sound of it. I would go for one of these, though I’m not a hundred percent sure which one is best and if it’s entirely error-free: 希望我能慢慢学回来 希望我会渐渐补回来 我希望它会慢慢恢复过来
    2 points
  24. I like the way he speaks (Chinese). However, I personally found all the English way too annoying. Seems like Hsk 4 shouldn't need all this English explanation of vocab. Other than that it does seem like a nice series. Have you ever considered hiring a Chinese native to tutor your kid? I could give a toss about Hsk. I study Chinese to use it with family, friends, and out in the street in China. I agree what some others have said, you learning that list of words is pretty pointless.
    2 points
  25. ....and a very good contribution to the opening post it was too. That video is well worth watching for anyone coming on here asking about tattoos. How often do we see queries about tattoos? Very often. Very witty video and really makes the point that if you're adamant about wanting a Chinese character as a tattoo, do your research - and I guess that's what the opening poster is doing by posing the question on here. Not sure I agree with her about font choice. She prefers a font in hand-writing style. Maybe it's a reflection of my less perfect Chinese, but I'd prefer a s
    2 points
  26. Sreeni, I saw your post, and wondered if you ever seen this youtube teacher I watch. This is my next lesson, https://youtu.be/OZ4uY3g6MWw He does all the grammar from all the HSK textbooks. He's not a big youtuber, I think because you have to get used to him and the style of lessons, rather than him not being good. Once you get used to his style, it's almost like he's teaching you personally. One of the best channels I found for my grammar and HSK learning. It also helps vocab, as your kid may have seen flashcards, but these are the
    2 points
  27. If you can find the time, 15 minutes a day will probably be better for your Chinese than 2 hours on the weekend, even though the latter involves more study time per time.
    2 points
  28. It's a very sad situation. I wanted to cheer myself up so I went to look at some optimistic statistics. In 1981, 88% of Chinese people were classed as in extreme poverty, earning less than $1.90 per day. Today that number is under 0.35%. In 2000, a mere 21 years ago, only 3% of Chinese people earned more than $5 per day. Today that number is over 48% source That's over $2 billion per day being given to people who were previously some of the poorest, most in need people in the world. There is a rumour China is overpopulated because it has the largest population in the world and many
    2 points
  29. Great topic — I look forward to watching the films when I have time. Possibly a good moment to add a mention for Educating Girls of Rural China (EGRC), a charity run out of Canada by a lady called Ching Tien who's originally from Beijing. Education is by far the best route out of poverty, and despite the recent advances, girls in rural areas of China are the most likely to be disadvantaged by a lack of educational opportunities. When I was teaching English in Beijing one of my Chinese students from a wealthy international college went to a rural village in
    2 points
  30. The sound track is very clear. This makes the father's voice easy to understand. He comes across as an intelligent guy who is genuinely trying to deal with a difficult situation. I appreciate the way you have depicted him, with respect. I've visited some villages in rural Yunnan where the kids theoretically had access to schooling, but a long hike was required to get to and from every day. The logistics, in addition to the expense, made it all too easy to drop out to help with seasonal chores and not go back. This seemed to be especially true among ethnic minorities.
    2 points
  31. I discussed this with a native and they suggested 子益 sounds nice, taken from the idiom 集思广益 which means 'draw on collective wisdom and absorb all useful ideas' with 益 itself meaning 'benefit, profit, advantage', which has the smart and respectful side. Alternatively, they suggested 子君 also sounds good, taken from 君临天下 which means to govern from above with 君 meaning 'sovereign, ruler' which would incorporate the leadership side.
    2 points
  32. 子媖? https://www.zdic.net/hans/媖
    2 points
  33. Definitely the most natural one. This is understandable but a little awkward to parse. Same with the 成 version.
    2 points
  34. @calculatrix Here is Slovenian: "Današnji dan bo jutri včerajšnji dan."
    2 points
  35. All those words are bad choices for a ~HSK 3 student. You should get a different book. If you saw a word list for english language learners, would you recommend they include the words immortal, out of practice, and smooth sailing? Time spent learning this list is time you're not spending learning words like: language, forever, haircut, romance, whether or not, kilometre, understand, queue, for example, mistake, quantity, spoon, traffic, method, normally, misunderstand, roughly/close enough, children, kitchen, answer, polite. What's more useful as a beginner?
    2 points
  36. Are you saying you were able to pass an HSK1 mock test with just 20 hours total of learning chinese?
    2 points
  37. I am a big fan of 许三观卖血记,it's a bit easier than 活着 and the story is just as good. I agree HSK5 people should be able to read it. If it's your first book and you are around HSK5 level, it will be very slow at the beginning. But if you keep going you'll realize by the end of the book you can read way faster.
    2 points
  38. Recent information suggests that the current HSK 1-6 will be around for a year or two yet. The new HSK 7-9 exam is supposed to be trialled in December and rolled out officially in March 2022, if I remember correctly.
    2 points
  39. If you liked 活着, I recommend trying 第七天, by the same author. It’s about the same length, and I thought the story was pretty interesting and well written.
    2 points
  40. Finished 许三观卖血记. That was excellent, maybe my favorite Chinese language novel I've read. Ill probably read something in English next as a break and then spend the spare time looking for my next Chinese novel, preferably something similar other than 活着 which I've read already.
    2 points
  41. Hi the site as down so had to waited couple of days, I was not able to get verified or upload pics, but it's now sorted.
    2 points
  42. I had to look up 勤能补拙: qínnéngbǔzhuō f.e. ineptitude can be remedied by diligence. Maybe diligence will win out over an unusual choice of early vocab....
    2 points
  43. I am from the UK. I am an English native speaker, and have no family ties to China. I went to China for a year at roughly HSK 1 (maybe half way to HSK 2 but I never tested) to attend language school full time in Shanghai. I studied 3 hours of textbook based classes and 1.5 hours of character classes 5 days per week. Before I left I passed my HSK 5 exam with a grade I am proud of. Accordingly, I estimate I know approximately 2,500 chinese words. The reason I say I think you're asking the wrong questions is because before I went to China I was studying 3 x 1 hour per week with 1 on 1
    2 points
  44. The theory of Visual-Auditory-Kinaesthetic (VAK) learning styles is based on discredited neuroscience, yes. Unfortunately this was taught in teacher training for years, but nobody ever seems to get any message after the training that it's not recognised any more. https://www.britishcouncil.org/voices-magazine/four-reasons-avoid-learning-styles-one-alternative However, learner preferences are widely acknowledged. As reflective learners we know if we have a preference for using diagrams, colour, sound, videos, paper, screens etc in our learning, and this is still entirely
    2 points
  45. 想 has many meanings, but when used to express a desire, it is better translated as 'feel like' or 'would like to' compared to 要 being more like 'want'. 想 can only be used with a verb, so your above sentence is wrong. Just like how in English you can't say "I would like to tea", you need to add the verb 'drink' in there: "我想喝茶". Side note: your above 要 sentence would also benefit from adding the verb 我要喝茶, but it's less of a hard rule with 要, and 要 can be used with non-verb sentences eg "which fruit would you like?" "我要苹果". You can't say 想 here. Another use for both 想 an
    2 points
  46. Has this Jim Kwik done any actual academic research or is he mostly selling an idea that sounds attractive? I get a bit skeptical when I see someone referring to himself as "The Brain Coach".
    2 points
  47. Qíge “Seven (Persons).” In the speech of many Chinese, the number qī “seven,” which is normally Tone One, changes to Tone Two when standing directly before a syllable in Tone Four. The same is true of the number bā “eight.” In other words: qī + ge → qíge bā + ge → báge These are considered optional tone changes, since not everyone makes them. It is not incorrect to say qīge and bāge without the tone change. Kubler,Cornelius C.. Basic Spoken Chinese (Basic Chinese) (p. 142). Tuttle Publishing. Kindle Edition.
    2 points
  48. Wechat -> Discover -> Shake -> Music -> shake your phone (I don't know why you need to do this instead of just pressing a button). Does a pretty good job of identifying songs, particularly if they're Chinese.
    2 points
  49. I'm all for fun idiosyncratic passion projects like translating explicit lyrics, but misogyny and disrespecting sex workers ain't cool so ima sit this one out
    2 points
  50. I'm subscribed to about a dozen different Chinese YouTube channels, but my favorite, by far, is 李永乐老师. His content is extremely interesting and top-notch, and rather than simply build the subtitles directly into the video, he uses YouTube subtitles. That means that I can use the "Zhongwen Popup Chinese Dictionary" browser extension to hover my mouse over the subtitle text and get a quick translation of any words I don't know. Most other Chinese channels that I've seen don't really have that feature. That also means that when I want to practice without the subtitles, I can turn them off. It's p
    2 points
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