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Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/16/2019 in all areas

  1. 5 points
    She's around 50 and didn't take kindly to you sending random bits of Internet slang? Play social Russian roulette, you're going to get shot in the head now and then. I think there's a not-particularly-wise tendency for learners to reach for the slang on the assumption that it's authentic and how people really talk. And it is, but it's also hugely variable across age groups and class and place and has to be used with caution.
  2. 3 points
    UPDATE TIME: I have read over 500,000 characters in books and articles this year. I am halfway through a long book that will bring me close to my million-character goal. Confident I will make it to a million by the end of the year. I keep a blog on Chinese Forums to chronicle my progress and review the books I read: One Million Characters blog
  3. 1 point
    Do you have Pleco? If not you should. Look there for a translation of 我心里没底. You'll see on Pleco that 没底 has a colloquial meaning a bit far from its literal meaning.
  4. 1 point
    I'd be careful on that one, it's more likely to go wrong than right in my view. You want to maximize your chances of getting a job not add in a wildcard so to speak. Sometimes idioms sound great in your head but then if you use it in the wrong context, mispronunciate and people didn't understand etc it can be quite embarrassing. Remember why you are there, they want to see if you will be an asset to the company and if your more suitable than other candidates, will you fit in with the rest of the company culture and so on. It's not to test your knowledge on idioms. Just my two cents but I have interview more than a hundred people I'd say I'm my time often for high profile jobs and many within china
  5. 1 point
    I have heard it used amongst my friends, usually inserting a swear word in the middle of a multiple syllable word so abso - fucking- lutley. And others in a similar vein.
  6. 1 point
    This is true even of slang words that are not likely to cause offense. When I first moved to China in 2010, I discovered that 你好吗 is used less frequently as a greeting than beginner textbooks suggest. While seemingly everyone said 你好, some of my younger Chinese friends greeted each other with 怎么样. So I tried using 怎么样 as a greeting too, with a middle-aged acquaintance.... and his response was confused silence. It can take a while to learn how new words are used.
  7. 1 point
    "Universities directly under the Ministry of Education" seems to be the term used for 教育部直属高校. (source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Key_Universities)
  8. 1 point
    In addition to excellent recommendations already provided by imron, another thing i learnt early on is read Chinese texts in blocks rather than by letters. Your reading speed in your native language (i'm assuming english) is so high because you read texts in blocks and not by sentence/word. I have no evidence but i think learning Chinese by words rather than characters might help a little in this aspect because when reading text your brain automatically segments the text into 1, 2 or 3 character blocks. This is one of the reasons its quite difficult to recognize unknown chengyus in text because the brain automatically segments it as two different character pairs. Reading endurance especially as regards to skipping unknown vocab while retaining comprehension is always good practice and has been mentioned by imron. I strictly timed myself with minimum score benchmarks. e.g 10 minutes 4 long texts 80% correction answers. I would seriously take this assessment by hanban with a pinch of salt....If the program is joint English/Chinese program then its possible to get by with the hsk5 but if its strictly Chinese then you'll probably find yourself running into a lot of hsk 6 and beyond word and phrases (i am not included technical vocabulary).
  9. 1 point
    Did you see this in a CJK country? Elsewhere it's not unusual to see mangled characters, often related to martial arts places.
  10. 1 point
    If you want to see an improvement in reading speed and recognition, then you should practice those things. These things might come naturally over time, but I don't see any harm in giving them a little push if that's what you want. To improve my reading speed, what I do is select a passage of text - this can be anything from 100 characters to a few thousand characters. Make sure it is something that is at your Chinese level. Nothing slows reading down like not understanding something. Go over the passage slowly, making sure you understand the meaning of every word and sentence, looking up and learning the ones you don't know - obviously you want to keep this to a minimum, hence the importance of selecting the right text. If you find the text is above your level, then you need to find a different passage. Now get a stopwatch (most mobile phones have them). Time yourself reading the same passage again at your normal reading speed. Calculate your reading speed in characters per minute (cpm = characters / seconds * 60). Let's say it came out to 100 cpm. Set yourself a target goal of 110 cpm and now read the same passage again but purposefully try to read it faster. Note any places that you got stuck on, or slowed you down and go over them closely until you are sure that they won't slow you down the next time. Repeat the process until you can read the passage at your target speed. Once you can do that, switch to a new passage of text and repeat the process. Once you can reach your target level on a new passage of text the first time you read it, set your target higher (say 120 cpm), and begin everything again. The keys to this are: *Selecting material at the right level - doing this sort of exercise is not about learning new words/characters, it's about improving the reading speed of things you already know. You don't want to be bogged down by unfamiliar words and sentence structures, so choosing the right material is key. *Timing yourself - having empirical evidence about your current reading speed is vital to helping you set realistic targets. It also helps show you the progress you are making, which can be a useful motivational tool when you find this sort of repetitive process bores you to tears. *Set small, easy to obtain targets for improvement - 10% increases in speed are usually quite easy to reach. This adds up quite quickly, and after regular practice, you'll find that you've doubled your reading speed. *Keep using new material - this shows that your actual reading speed is improving, rather than you just being familiar with the same passage of text. *Regular practice - You're better off doing 20 mins a day everyday, rather than 3 hours once a week - use something like 100% (which I developed) to help track and monitor progress. To give you a gauge for the kind of speeds you should be looking at reaching, a native speaker on average typically reads anywhere from 300-700 cpm. For the old HSK Advanced, you needed to be reading at around 200-250 cpm just to be able to read all the questions. For the new HSK6 you need to be reading at around 170 cpm just to be able to read everything.
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