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Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/31/2020 in all areas

  1. 6 points
    Professional interpreter though not note-taker here. Advice on note-taking: - Depening on how soon 'soon' is, don't try to learn an entirely new set of shorthand symbols. - Presuming you've been through secondary school and university, you probably have already developed some shorthand symbols and abbreviations when note-taking in classes. Use those, brush them up a bit if necessary. Maybe develop a few new symbols or abbreviations, but not too many. - Practice. Find a video (or audio recording) and practice note-taking and interpreting that. Best is if you can find a video of one of the speakers talking about the subject at hand, but someone else talking about generally that subject also works just fine. Advice on preparations: - Prepare, prepare, prepare. This means practice, but also ask the speaker(s) if they can send you the content of what they're going to say beforehand, or as much information as possible. Look up all the unknown words and learn them by heart. Then revise that vocab every day (or every hour, if you only have two days). - They will tell you it will be easy and light on jargon. This is never true. Ask for background information on the meeting anyway. - Don't feel bad about asking for this information beforehand; the more professional the interpreter, the more material they want for their preparation. Advice during interpretation: - The most important thing, even more important than remembering all the vocab, is to keep calm and concentrate. - It's not about you. You are not personally important in this interaction. If it turns out all speakers actually have excellent German and don't need you at all, thus making all your painstaking preparations superfluous, smile and be happy for them. - Also, if you have something to say or to ask in the meeting, too bad, you are not personally present in this meeting. (Unless you are, maybe discuss this with your boss beforehand.) - If you missed something or didn't understand something, calmly ask the speaker to repeat. Better to lose a little face than to get the message wrong.
  2. 6 points
    I have done undergraduate degrees in both the UK and China. This is only my opinion, but I would definitely say do your degree in the UK first. University recognition is one aspect. But the other is that you will likely learn much more about your subject studying in English than you would struggling through in Chinese. (Even if the course in China is ostensibly taught in English, you may find that in reality, the classes are all in Chinese anyway. At least this is what I have heard about the English language medicine course at Fudan University.) From a western employer's point of view, they will want to know that you are competent in your field. Having done a degree in China, you will find it difficult to compete with people who have done the degree in their mother language. From a Chinese employer's point of view, not only will your competence unlikely be comparable with local students having studied the same course, but your Chinese language skills will not be able to compete either. And that is not taking into account the 2 years of work experience requirement. And that is not taking into account that most jobs are not open to foreigners anyway. And that is not taking into account that these are the current policies - what they will be like in 3-4 years time is unpredictable. In addition, an important part of going to university is the "university experience" - all of the social activities, be it pub crawling with your classmates (not something that I ever engaged in), or organised extra curricular activities (which I participated in quite a lot). These will be easy to get involved in in the UK. There is much less of this in China, and you will always be an outsider in China. Foreign students cannot live in the same dormitories as Chinese students (thankfully, because conditions are pretty poor), which means that, even not taking the language and cultural barriers into account, you will never be able to form as close relationships with your classmates as they will have with each other, and they will do all kinds of things together without including you. Of course, attending university in China is also an experience, but very very different from what you would get in the UK. If, on your UK course, you are able to spend a year in Shanghai, that would be excellent. If you are not too constrained by finances, you could also spend holiday time in China. Also, there are many foreign students from China in British universities (though it remains to be seen if this is still the case next year given the Covid situation), so you could consider doing language exchanges (which is what I did at university in the UK). Time goes very quickly and you will have ample opportunity to get to China in the future. I would not advise sacrificing the benefits of going to university in the UK for the sake of getting to China a couple of years earlier. You would be much better off doing your undergrad here and going to China for a masters. Finally, I'm not sure if you have been to China, but I would also do some research into what living and working in China is like currently. I used to live in China and loved every day, and if I had more time, I wouldn't hesitate to go back. Having said that, though, it is not as free and open and welcoming as it used to be. With the current tensions with the west and rising nationalism amongst the Chinese, things could change for the worse. This is also worth considering, because living in China may not be how you imagine.
  3. 5 points
    Just wanted to share this channel I discovered a few weeks ago: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCas3AC0PvAbSvGDMV4dCA4Q/videos. This may be of interest to those who enjoy watching calm walks around a city on a steady cam (like Rambalac does in Japan). The person behind that channel does a great job in showcasing the best bits of Chengdu and already has uploaded a couple hours worth of footage, so you have plenty of places to start discovering or to feel nostalgic about. If you don't know where to start, I recommend you this one, shot around Sichuan University, a very nice area filled both with students and foreigners alike. If someone knows of other "walkers" around China, please let us know!
  4. 4 points
    It's been a few years, but I finally got around to sharing the source code to all of my tools, graph generation, etc. on GitHub: https://github.com/glxxyz/hskhsk.com
  5. 4 points
    It's preferable not to post Youtube and similar blocked links without at least explaining what it is a little, so people in China can decide if they need to turn a VPN on or whatever.
  6. 4 points
    As discussed here, and then decided by me a bit unilaterally (sorry) the Book of the Month for June 2020 is 《景恒街》 by 笛安. If June 2020 has long passed and you're reading this book later, welcome! Feel free to partake anyway and leave your thoughts. Di An (1983) is a young writer with so far numerous short stories and novels under her belt, won prizes, yada yada. I liked her 《芙蓉如面柳如眉》, a murder story with lots of twists, and her latest book came recommended to me, so I decided to read it. It's a pretty hefty book, 326 pages in my edition, separated into five parts, which are in turn separated into chapters. The language so far is medium to maybe a little bit hard. More difficult than 《草鞋湾》, slightly easier than 《六人晚餐》. The book starts with... a sex scene. Interesting. We don't find out yet who 她 and 他 are. Part 1, chapter 1: We meet our main characters: 朱灵境, fairly recent graduate in statistics, now working at a big firm. When we meet her, it's New Year, the company is folding because angel investor MJ will no longer fund it, so Lingjing is losing her job. Then the MJ representative offers her a job at his firm. 刘鹏, aka Tony, aka Iron Man 钢铁侠, one of the three owning partners of MJ. Has an amazing memory. Hires Lingjing because she seems promising. 孟舵主, other partner; 夏雪莉, third owning partner. Always votes with 孟舵主 when it comes to deciding which companies to invest in. 冯小雅, one of the first employees of MJ, works under Iron Man. Convinced everyone a few years ago to invest in the startup 蔓越莓, which was a good decision as it is now going public (is that the term) and the stocks do really well. She is also pregnant, late to the Monday meeting, and about to give birth in the elevator as the chapter ends. I find the corporate bits less interesting than the humour and the Beijing slice of life (Lingjing, as she travels over the Second Ring Road during 春节, notes to herself that wow, it's possible for the Second Ring Road not to be gridlocked). So far (20 pages in) it resembles the 《圈子圈套》 books but more human and funnier. No word list today, perhaps some other time.
  7. 4 points
    This comes up often here, and the reply is usually the same: what can you offer an employer in China that a Chinese cannot? The days are long gone when Chinese companies would hire a Westerner just so they could have a foreign face on exhibit in the office. Your best shot, as always in this sort of situation, is to find a German or EU company staffing a rep office or other small operation in China, where your German language skills and cultural fit are important. But go that route and you can't be too fussy about where you'll end up in China. (Yiwu's not a bad place. Really, it isn't.) Sure, you can set up your own operation of some sort and it can be a lot more flexible and fun than working for a multinational. The problem, as you've discovered, is that your own business can easily turn into a money pit and bankrupt you. The success rate is very low. Your situation is particularly bothersome. You don't have some great idea you're hungering to make a commercial success. Instead, you're just looking for something to do that'll enable you to stay in China. That doesn't sound promising to me, unless you have lots of money to burn. EDIT: I see there's a German Chamber of Commerce in China, and they even have an office in Chengdu. Contact them and get a list of German companies with operations there. Who knows, maybe the Chamber of Commerce itself has openings. https://china.ahk.de/membership/south-southwest-china Better than that, they post job openings with German companies: https://www.de-jobmarket.com/ Including one with the Chamber of Commerce itself, in Tianjin (a fine place): https://www.de-jobmarket.com/job/project-manager-tianjin-mw-2/ (I don't understand German so I'm not sure what "Muttersprache Chinesisch" there means)
  8. 4 points
    I'll save you the work. I got impatient and ended up hiring a freelancer in China to buy the 2010 book and do the data entry. If anybody wants the list, please feel free to send me a direct message.
  9. 4 points
    I just finished the novel《草鞋湾》 by 曹文轩. It was Book of the Month for May 2020 [or whenever] and it is excellent. The novel has a dedicated thread accessible via this link.
  10. 4 points
    Or maybe how similar the Romance languages are... If you already studied French then Spanish is pretty simple. Plus, knowing the Roman alphabet and a few diacritics you can already read all the Romance languages and most of the Germanic group (Icelandic has a few characters of its own). One of my favourite books of all time, which I bang on about at length whenever I get a sympathetic ear, is The Loom of Language by Frederick Bodmer. It compares the major Romance languages and the most common Germanic languages as two groups, with all the similar vocab side-by-side. It also has quite an extensive discussion of the contribution of Latin and Greek to modern European languages. One of the most inspirational books I ever read, which is saying something considering it was published in 1944. Edit: It's online at archive.org. Most of the fun (IMHO) is to be had in the "Language Museum" at the end.
  11. 4 points
    Here goes my first thread. Repost from another discussion: Hi everyone. I've been following the "What are you reading"-thread and noticed some of you guys have read quite a lot. I really like what I've read of 山楂树之恋 so far (15 chapters in), and will probably order 活著 as well, considering its being mentioned a lot. Some further recommendations would be fantastic, and I here describe what I am looking for and my reading experience so far. I'm going to compare with films since that's my age old interest. 1. I absolutely adore the settings in a lot of Hou Hsiao-hsien movies and also A Brighter Summer Day by Edward Yang, we're talking 1950's Taiwan but also up to the 1980's. The relocation to Taiwan, the Japanese legacy (perhaps I'm using the wrong English word here), the youth gangs, night school and all that. I do have Crystal Boys (Niezi) on the shelf, but decided I'd go for something easier for a first book, and that certainly seems very worthwhile. 2. 1940's Shanghai or perhaps a bit earlier, but preferably the 40s. I do know about 围城, and while it seems very interesting, I'm thinking more romance, spy stories and such, the dark streets, the nightclubs. Think Lust, Caution. 3. 1960's Hong Kong. Think In the Mood for Love. 4. Qing dynasty culture. Vague, I know. I adored the first few hundred pages of The Dream of the Red Chamber (English version) but have decided to wait until I can read it in Chinese. And yes, I do realize that's going to take a long, long wait, but I'm also thinking it should be worth it! 5. Detective stuff. Serial killers and the like. Think Cure (Kiyoshi Kurosawa), giallo and the like. I don't think I'm much into wuxia or fantasy novels. Now, 山楂树之恋 is my first book, but 15 chapters in I can safely say I have no trouble reading or understanding it. That said, it also means I still have no idea what my level is currently at. So after finishing that one I don't know where to go next. I've noticed it's much longer than say, 活著, which I've noticed is being regarded as a good first book. 山楂树之恋 has twice the amount of unique words than 活著, but as we all know words are one thing, and structure another. Will I run into a brick wall going for something else than 活著? 🧐 I would love to read something by Eileen Chang, like 張愛玲, but I'm guessing that's way, way above my current level. Even more so for Mo Yan. Perhaps you know of books that are not specifically in the abovementioned areas, but close enough? If so, I'll certainly look them up.
  12. 4 points
    My parcel arrived wednesday, about 10 days after I placed the order, by way of a DHL guy knocking on my door no less! The items arrived in one piece without any damage to them. So 京东 worked out well
  13. 3 points
    In case anyone finds this thread and my site is down, the lists are now in GitHub along with all of my source code: https://github.com/glxxyz/hskhsk.com/tree/master/data/lists
  14. 3 points
    Aww sorry for that. This age range is based on some theories assuming that people at different age demonstrate different learnabilities. Experiment participants need to be controlled within similar traits somehow. But thank you for your reply!
  15. 3 points
    It looks to me like a strong invitation to use 一边…, 一边…。
  16. 3 points
    Some replies to my emails are starting to trickle in, regarding the at-home tests run by UK Confucius Institutes. Edinburgh - not doing them Nottingham - doing HSK 1-6 on 28 June. See website for registration and payment details; also this PDF. Sheffield - haven't decided yet Manchester - planning them for early September London South Bank University (TCM institute) - not doing them I'll update this post if/when I get more replies.
  17. 3 points
  18. 3 points
    The stats seem consistent with other novels - partly it's due to the issues roddy said about the HSK lists not containing words that CTA will treat as words, but I think the main cause is because HSK lists are general and are designed to cover a broad range of texts and broad range of genres, so it goes broad rather than deep. This is the opposite of most novels, which will be on a specific topic, in a specific genre and go deep rather than broad. Note, one of the main reasons I added the HSK stats was to show just how far off the HSK is from native content. Due to segmentation and other issues, the word statistics should be treated as ballpark level correct, rather than absolutely correct. This still makes them suitable for comparing texts (because any texts you compare will have the same issues), and also for extracting frequently used unknown words (because even with segmentation errors, frequently used words will still float to the top).
  19. 3 points
    Sure, no problem. Glad to oblige. I'm assuming of course that Fido has a diplomatic passport.
  20. 3 points
    The downloads here seem to work if anyone can't get hold of a copy by other means, but I've not looked at them closely. There's also a bit of a review here. Do hope to read this one (although the twisty-murder one sounds a little more interesting) but won't be immediately. Thanks, Lu! Edit: A few stats from CTA: 146k total characters, 9,000 unique words, 32% of total words and 70% of unique words are *outside* of HSK1-6. Edit Edit: I see elsewhere that the book has 170k characters - which makes me think the electronic version might not be complete. Be careful.
  21. 3 points
    Tomsima is too modest to point you to his blog on studying interpretation, which has much useful information. https://www.chinese-forums.com/blogs/blog/127-tomsima-interpreting-blog/ (Blogs here are hard to find unless you know they're there.)
  22. 3 points
    By the way, I suggest we start topics for both books. Even if we read the books asynchronously—in different orders and at different speeds—the social aspect sure is fun. I know I’ve enjoyed catching up on all of your 草鞋湾 posts as I go through the novel.
  23. 3 points
    My guess is Google translate or similar, which gives: "It is impossible to have love in my heart". The actual meaning is something like "With love in the heart, nothing is impossible"
  24. 3 points
    Okay, read chapters 1-3 yesterday. No need for me to repeat what others have already said in prior posts. Looking forward to the story getting under way with 沙丘克 and 盛大中 meeting in the morning.
  25. 3 points
    Hmm. I had not even thought about taking the train. That is worth exploring. Thanks for the idea. Maybe I can arrange to get smuggled across the border by one of the Snakehead gangs and pay off my debt by washing dishes 5 years in a busy back-street 家常菜 restaurant, selling opium on the side.
  26. 3 points
    May I suggest a Chinese newspaper or 2 from Shanghai? Both are free, unencumbered by adds and other pests, have very good apps in IOs and Android as well as websites. My fav for some time has been 界面 , together with Caixin, the nearest thing to an independent Chinese newspaper --- with 'Chinese Characteristics' but at least not owned by the officialdom. It has a huge choice of articles on all sorts of topics, great for world news as well as finances/business, kind-of-thing but also has many articles in the culture, technology lifestyle, society and other sections. Even when I have no time to read, I enjoy checking the 'Most Read' page against the 首体 front in my iOS app, I find it rather enlightening. There are also good articles in The Paper though in the last year or so its top pages are just like any other State owned newspaper. It still has good stuff in the other sections, the Culture pages always have stuff I want to read.
  27. 3 points
    Chapters 12 and 13 供词 ɡònɡcí - confession 蹩脚 biéjiǎo - shoddy 示意 shìyì - to signal 光溜溜 ɡuānɡliūliū - slippery 葫芦瓢 葫芦 húlupiáo - gourd 绊倒 bàndǎo - to trip over, stumble 戳 chuō - to jab 麻利 máli - dextrous 手绢 shǒujuàn - handkerchief 钟楼 zhōnɡlóu - clock tower 踟蹰 chíchú - to hesitate 抵赖 dǐlài - to disavow 扑朔迷离 pūshuò-mílí - complicated and confusing 交接 jiāojiē - to hand over 天经地义 tiānjīng-dìyì - in line w/the principles of heaven and earth 拐卖 guǎimài - to traffic, kidnap and sell 寸步 cùnbù - a single step
  28. 3 points
    @timseb, can I suggest you start a new topic for your recommendations request - it'll get seen by more people, and the discussion won't get mixed up with the practicalities of book ordering. No need to write anything new, just paste in what you've already written.
  29. 3 points
    Great to see more and more people getting response with regard to ur CSC application. Congratulation guys and be prepared to have an amazing adventure in China ! Just sharing some of my experience, if the university tells you that they've nominated you and have forwarded your name to CSC, just still don't keep your hopes high yet. It could be that your name is only in the waiting list. It happens to me in 2017-2018 application. 2 universities nominated me but at the end, I didn't get the scholarship. I applied again the next year in the year 2019-2020 session and finally won the CSC type B scholarship. On the other hand, if it is the embassy that nominate's you, I would say your chance to win the scholarship is pretty high. At this time, you've done everything you can. So, just wait until the middle of July or even August. So, good luck everyone !
  30. 3 points
    Chapters 10 and 11 顺藤摸瓜 shùnténɡ-mōɡuā - follow a clue to get results 闪失 shǎnshī - mishap 凶相 xiōnɡxiànɡ - ferocious/fiendish look 有声有色 yǒushēnɡ-yǒusè - full of sound and color 别致 biézhì - unique 弹跳 tántiào - bounce 败露 bàilù - come to light 何止 hézhǐ - be far more than 蛮荒 mánhuānɡ - wild, uncivilized region 码 mǎ - to pile up 揣度 chuǎiduó - surmise 沓 dá - pile (of paper) 梗 ɡěnɡ - to straighten up 差错 chācuò - accident 煞有介事 shàyǒujièshì - to take sth seriously 堂堂 tánɡtánɡ - formidable 徒有虚名 túyǒu-xūmíng - not live up to one’s name 蒙蒙亮 mēnɡmēnɡliànɡ - dawn-like 直勾勾 zhígōugōu - fixed (gaze) 簌簌 sùsù - rustling sound 一瞥 yīpiē - to take a glance 不屈不挠 bùqū-bùnáo - dauntless
  31. 3 points
    Both Fudan and Nanjing are C9 universities, as I am sure you are aware, and definitely you will get many "哇~~~" from the locals. I don't have an opinion on Chongqing university, but I am guessing it would be on par with Sichuan University here in Chengdu (which is okay, but not at C9 level aside from medical specialties). I can't really speak for the Edinburgh degree, but Scotland is well known for the quality of its education. If it's a double degree you get that sweet 2x1 deal which definitely will help you out there... and the Erasmus experience is always fantastic, even more if you get to do it at Jiao Tong (in Shanghai). You also get to keep your family & friends around and, being from Glasgow, you also get the benefit of a comfort bubble. However, If you choose a Chinese university you will: Be "alone". Sure, you'll make friends from many different countries and you will be able to talk back and forth with the UK... but, since you are mentioning you are young, the support you have gotten up until now from your family/friends/society, will cease to exist. This is one of the reasons why many foreigners don't make it past their first year in China. Have to adapt. From the food you eat, to the way you move around, to the temperature you wash your clothes. This is another reason why many foreigners don't make it past their first year in China; heck, it's even one of the reasons why on that single year they don't venture much outside "western ghettos" and can be seen at your local foreign gastro-pub on a wednesday, whining about "how difficult/bad/smelly/etc" is China and dining on 50kuai beers and microwaved pizza. Be challenged by the local education system... which is plenty different to what you are used to, and doesn't mind being boring as long as you get the point. Sure, you will also get some of the best and accomplished professors in the country and many of them have been abroad (so they are aware of "western needs"), but their curriculum is not as flexible as you will wish for it to be. The way you will be tested is also different, specially if you come directly from pre-university education. Enjoy the new "freedoms"! Yes, China is usually demonised for its restrictions, but should also be celebrated for the good things you can only enjoy there: you don't feel like queuing up at the supermarket? Fine, here's this guy that will bring you anything for 3,5kuai in 20min; hungry at 3 am? Everything's open, from BBQ to supermarkets; feel like going skiing or surfing or skydiving? Fine, here's a very reasonable-priced high-speed train ready to take you there in a couple hours, a cheap hotel to serve as a home-base to explore and good tasty meals to go along. Many places can offer you some of these things, but not all at once as China does. Grow a lot in a very short span. This only applies if you are willing to, but I found that my time as a youngster there was pivotal in my growth to become an adult. I was paying bills and taking care of myself in a way none of my friends back at home were doing. All in all, a difficult choice.
  32. 2 points
    Wondering whether people would be interested in a guide for this app. Just so that even the most elementary of students can benefit from it. E.g.: ❶ 智能纠音:AI Pronunciation Correction AI-driven test that provides the user with list of words together with their pronunciation and grades the pronunciation of each component; initial syllable (声母), final syllable (韵母), and tone (声调). The test keeps track of your mistakes, sub-categorizes them, which allows you to revisit them later for further revision. ❷ 发音:Pronunciation / Chinese Syllable Chart A chart of the syllables and all their tones which you can listen to individually . ❸ AI 学习: Self-test & Study Plan Approximates your proficiency in Mandarin by giving you a short 5 minute test, the result of which it will use to create a lesson plan of the various ❹ 我的课程:Your Classes Quick overview of your latest classes. ❺电台:Broadcasting Station Features weekly media fragments of actors, narrators and voice actors with clear pronunciation. Ranging from audio books, movies and documentaries. ❻ 课程:List of Lessons List of all available classes on the app. The classes are subdivided in foundation (基础备考), specifics (考点专项), further improvement (高分加训), and ❼ 发现:Community Posts Record yourself and share it with the community. As well as listen to fellow students, and comment on / follow their progress. ❽ 我的:Profile & Settings Other than the daily sign-in (打卡) for study coins (学币) it’s pretty self-explanitory.
  33. 2 points
    Very interesting topic, hoping you can find the answers you are looking for. Considering that "the people of Suriname are among the most diverse in the world, spanning a multitude of ethnic, religious, and linguistic groups", doesn't the Suriname/Dutch governments have some sort of demographic institute that specializes on this? Perhaps you can contact them with your query? Edit: General Bureau of Statistics of Suriname & Netherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute
  34. 2 points
  35. 2 points
    If - as seems likely - western democracies are now well into the first year of a Cold War with China, we'll all have to adjust our plans for the future - and be grateful for the years we had when things were easier.
  36. 2 points
    Hi, I am just applying for a Chinese program that I did in the last fall semester from September 2019 till January 2020. The summer semester I cancelled because of Corona. Now I applied for the fall semester again and now the same university suddenly wants a Letter of Guarantee. The whole application and arriving at the university procedure was also very inefficient last year there. It seems that now the procedure is even more senseless and inefficient that I would rather study Chinese at another university in Chengdu where they don't need a Letter of Guarantee. Can someone recommend a good university in Chengdu for studying Chinese where I can still apply now. I quote from what is written inside that Letter of Guarantee document "In case of any special circumstance, the guarantor will immediately report to the Student Affair Office, and bear joint legal liability for the consequences of the relevant illegal acts from the warrantee. The guarantor shall be the first responsible person." "1. The guarantor must be a citizen of mainland China or a foreigner with a legal visa in China;" For me this doesn't make any sense. It would make a little sense if relatives or someone close to me would have to sign such a letter but a stranger that is a citizen of mainland China or a foreigner with a legal visa in China shall be liable for anything a foreign student in China does? I would never sign such a document for someone unless this is maybe a relative. I find it embarassing to ask a citizen of mainland China or a foreigner with a legal visa in China to sign such a letter for me and also send scans of his/her passport to me which they also require. It is even illegal in some countries to send copies of the own passport to someone. Does someone know a university in Chengdu that doesn't require such a procedure?
  37. 2 points
    For people interested in a basic college level text that is no longer in copyright in most countries (the author died in 1944) should take a look at J. J. Brandt's "Introduction to Literary Chinese". It reminds me a little bit of the Shaddick I used in college. https://archive.org/details/introductiontoli00branuoft/page/n5/mode/2up
  38. 2 points
    I don't know how we find out which centres are running it... these at-home tests don't seem to be listed on chinesetest.cn When I contacted the Sheffield Confucius Institute (see above) they suggested I also contact other UK centres to see what they're doing. It all seems a bit ad hoc. Here's a list of members of "Confucius Institute Network UK" (CINUK) which I guess should include them all. Taken from this page over at Manchester Uni. Edit: I just emailed them all to find out what their plans are. Apart from Cardiff, whose website was down, and UoW/Trinity St David, who have buried their email address and I'm too tired to dig for it just now. (I managed to email Cardiff and UWTSD now.)
  39. 2 points
    Alright, I've gone ahead and made a thread for my current book 《景恒街》 here and I tried to make clear how welcome future readers are as well. Come join now or later, whenever you're ready, there's no rush!
  40. 2 points
    If you can listen to the lyrics and figure out how it's phrased (which might not be easy, I know) you can get much better results. Google translate: 心中有爱没有不可能 = It is impossible to have love in my heart 心中有爱。没有不可能 = There is love in my heart. Nothing is impossible Of course, it's possible to get it completely wrong. 心中有爱? 没有。 不可能! = There is love in my heart? No. Impossible!
  41. 2 points
    Probably parsing it as 心中有爱没有? 不可能! instead of (如)心中有爱//(就)没有不可能!
  42. 2 points
    The wrist one is 吉, meaning lucky, auspicious
  43. 2 points
    Just dropping by to report on how my teacher and I went with this. We had a few lessons experimenting with different approaches (including starting on the HSK 5 textbook, which we both agreed was too soon), and eventually settled on this book for now: 新HSK汉语学习与考试教程 书写与口语 (四级) New HSK Chinese Learning and Test Course: Writing and Speaking Level 4 It's interesting because although it says HSK 4, it's actually more of a bridging book for moving to HSK 5, or at least that's how my teacher described it and I think it's a fair appraisal. Plus it's not just focused on HSK as such; as it says in the title it has 口语 exercises as well, such as describing photographs orally like you do in the HSKK exams. At this point I've identified that I need to work more on consolidating grammar and practicing speaking/listening, and the exercises in here seem to fit quite well. There are 10 chapters with two vocab sections in each chapter. Despite being supposedly level 4 the vocab doesn't entirely match up with this... According to Chinese Text Analyser the vocab look like this: HSK 1-4: 83.84% (82.23% of which are "HSK 4 words") HSK 5: 11.31% (63 words) HSK 6: 0.36% (2 words) other: 4.49% (25 words) I make it 548 words in total — I've typed them all up — but CTA reckons there are 557. (Hmmm... maybe segmentation of longer terms, @imron?) I reckon this is pretty useful, because the HSK 4 exam will include bits of HSK 5 thrown in. The grammar points also go beyond what I thought were HSK 4 grammar points as well. I also asked ages ago here about sources of vocab that are organised thematically, and this book does do that... sort of. At least the chapters are thematic, so there is some sensible grouping of vocab. The exercises in each chapter are all based around the theme too. Here's the table of contents: 1. 居家生活 2. 旅游、交通 3. 业余生活 4. 身体与健康 5. 饮食 6. 购物 7. 学习与工作 8. 大自然 9. 友谊与爱情 10. 生活与环境 I think I remember seeing a very old post about this book on the forums, but can't find it just now. The version I have is dated 2015. Edit: I stumbled across it again, and that post from 2012 that I was thinking of was actually about a couple of different books. Despite this, it's a very useful-looking post about preparing for HSK 5. Edit: I meant to add that in this book all the grammar explanations are in Chinese, so I definitely need my teacher's help with this at the moment. Then again, this has provided a reason to start learning the Chinese names for grammatical terms... 副词、形容词、量词、复句、等等...... and it feels like it's probably time I did this anyway. At the very beginning, the book also has some brief guidance notes (both English and Chinese) on exam technique for the HSK 4 exam.
  44. 2 points
    @xinoxanu thanks! Revamped document reader is going to hit 'ready for beta' probably today or tomorrow, as it happens (though still a number of other parts of the app that aren't quite there yet).
  45. 2 points
    According to SCMP, it seems the plan to allow transit to the mainland from HKIA from June 1st was scrapped at the last minute: Coronavirus: transit through Hong Kong airport to and from mainland China not allowed in first phase of opening up https://www.scmp.com/news/hong-kong/hong-kong-economy/article/3086825/coronavirus-transit-through-hong-kong-airport-and
  46. 2 points
    Some of the books recommended were sadly not available, but they are all bookmarked for the future. Order is now placed, thank you everyone!
  47. 2 points
    From a few years back... I'm wondering what the best way to handle this is, on the assumption that you know both character sets well and are happy to treat them as interchangeable - ie, if I mark 个 as known, I don't want 個 turning up in an unknown list, and vice versa. Off the top of my head... 1) Decide on one character set to use CTA with and convert to that before feeding any text in. FWIW, I find MS Word's Trad>Simp conversion very reliable. (actually, looking at it more carefully now, I'm changing my mind on this. Plenty of mistakes you can easily skim over as they're similar enough, but not as good as I thought). You could then back-convert exported unknown word lists if you wanted (although I'm less sure on MS Word's Simp>Trad conversion, and at that point it's working with a list of words and won't have so much context to go on. Not sure what difference that makes. Conversion issues aside, this seems most elegant as you don't have 'duplicate' entries. 2) Every time you switch character sets, take your known word list, convert it, paste in, mark all as known. Again, possible conversion issues and I'm not keen on what it does to vocabulary size. 3) Manually add as you go along. This seems least efficient. Would appreciate any 前车之鉴。 I really enjoy using CTA. Not sure how much demand there'd be, but if you ever thought of a Pro / Advanced version with some extra features, I'd be on board.
  48. 2 points
    I have ordered books at Taaze twice from Spain and everything went fine. I remember I had a little problem with the Spanish customs, they asked me about the content of the pack, but when I said they were books, I only had to pay the books VAT, and that was it.
  49. 2 points
    Please read this article: https://supchina.com/2019/03/20/the-actual-worth-of-chinese-language-proficiency/ TLDR; Even people who are near-fluent in Chinese may not be able to leverage this to improve their job prospects.
  50. 2 points
    You need to separate getting the best education you can from language and "good experience" issues. Stay in the U.K and get a good education, a good education in your mother tongue where you'll understand everything you're being taught and won't be distracted by language and cultural issues. Remember that to a large degree, at least outside the hard sciences, a university education means learning to compose English at a university level. Is that going to happen in China? I'd urge staying in the U.K. very strongly: it's not a close call in my mind. There'll be plenty of time later in life for studying, living and working in China. As an aside, what's the extent of your experience in China, given you mention your wish to "go back to the country which I loved."
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