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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 03/13/2019 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    Platform(s): PC / Mac OS X Where to buy: here System Requirements: OS: Windows 7 64-bit, Processor: Intel Core i3 6100 or AMD FX-4350, Memory: 4 GB RAM, Graphics: NVIDIA Geforce GT 1030, 2GB (Legacy: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 460), AMD RX550, 2GB (Legacy: AMD Radeon HD 6850), Integrated: Intel HD Graphics 630, DirectX: Version 11, Storage: 5 GB available space Release Date: 30 Aug 2018 Languages: English and Chinese (both text and audio), French, Italian, German, Russian, Polish, Spanish (text only) Chinese Level Required: intermediate/upper intermediate Proportion of play time where you'll be using Chinese: High (lots of text-based resource management, plus plenty of audio) Specific/specialised Vocab Learned: Medical This game is a spiritual successor to the popular mid-90s sim Theme Hospital. Your job is to build and maintain hospitals in a variety of challenging environments. It takes a pretty cynical view on private healthcare, and the main aim of the game is to make money rather than cure patients. A game centred around illness could get a little depressing, so the developers have created their own humorous diseases and cures. You'll be dealing with illnesses such as Freddie Mercury Sickness rather than the common cold: Despite the relatively low system requirements, my laptop still isn't quite up to running it, but a fellow forum member, @markhavemann, has played the game and was kind enough to leave the following review:
  2. 2 points
    Just a heads up for anyone thats interested, Two Point hospital is free for trial over this weekend, and is 33% off at the moment (dont know how long that offer has been on for, but seems like the price is right to me). Ive been playing this all evening, and so far the Chinese localisation seems to be fantastic. I mean I was laughing out loud when the message for "光頭症" was announced. I mean the fact that I can laugh in English at 'light-headedness' and watch someone get their "光頭" switched out and laugh just as much, is quite something. For me the level of Chinese is not difficult, and I like the fact that the little doc at the bottom of the screen disappears quickly, so theres quite a lot of speed comprehension to get in too. If theres one downside (which is paradoxically also a massive upside), its that the names of the diseases are all jokes, meaning theres no actual opportunity to learn real names of diseases, conditions, diagnosis terms etc. All in all, having a great time, definitely going to buy this game.
  3. 2 points
    Here is the first installment of my blog on doing a Masters course in Translation and Interpretation (Chinese) at Bath University in the UK. Seeing as it is reading week, I've found I finally have time to do an update on how things are going, I guess I will probably do the next update when we break up for Christmas in December. There's really no time to do anything else except study and class prep in normal term time. Well I've been on the course for six weeks now, and it has been as intense as expected. Despite being at a UK university, I am the only westerner on the course, with 23 students, mainly mainland, but also a few Taiwanese and HK too. There is actually a Taiwanese American student who has taken English as his mother tongue (with all due right), but having been bilingual and living in Taiwan for the last 20 or so years, I feel like we're not really in the same boat. I am clearly bottom of the class in terms of relative language ability, as expected. Being surrounded by people who have studied English for decades, my 5/6 years of Mandarin stands out as particularly bad. I am so used to speaking Chinese colloquially, I am frequently lost for words when asked to interpret English speeches into Chinese using the right register. Anyway, onto the course content. All parts of the course have a two hour class slot that meets once a week: Simultaneous interpreting: we have a dedicated lab with fully equiped professional booths that all face into a bigger room with a conference table in the middle. The set up accurately mimics a real simultaneous interpreting situation, and the tech available is fantastic. Classes are very active, with every student having a chance to practice every class at least twice (practicing skills taught by the teacher in the lesson). I was placed on an internship at a UN week-long environmental protection meeting two weeks ago in London, to get in some valuable practice time. We used the real booths used by the pros for a week (with our mics switched off of course). We did shadowing and interpreting (almost exclusively from English into Chinese) for around 8 hours a day for a week. After this week something clicked in my brain, and now I can keep up with my peers in this class now. Not only that, but my professional Chinese has improved a lot as a result of the E-C direction. I have also discovered that in many cases working from English into Chinese is more often than not EASIER than Chinese to English. Why? I personally feel like the sparsity of phrases 'like' 成語 in English, plus the terseness of professional Chinese means you've always got enough time to think and interpret. Chinese to English is so much harder than I expected, to put it lightly. For example, 授人以魚不如授人以漁 was said in a speech during class a few weeks ago; not only had I not heard the phrase before, but I had no time to guess the meaning (多音字嘛 I thought the person had said the same thing twice by a mistake...), and by the time it was already too late the interpreting student had already interpreted it into "better to teach a man to fish than to give him a fish". I mean, that makes more sense than what I was able to offer (which was just silence). So, simultaneous as a skill, I can do. But the sheer amount of knowledge you need at your fingertips is insane, and I am still far from being at a professional level yet. Consecutive interpreting: This class is largely centred around memory skills and note taking. Most of my peers have already studied interpreting in some form or another before starting this course, and many are already able to acurately remember speeches of five or more minutes long using some quite fantastic symbol-based systems. The teacher does not teach us a system, but rather teaches us how to build our own personal system effectively. I have found that using English keywords and acronyms has helped a lot, but really don't get too much of a kick out of arrows going everywhere and houses with dollar signs on them etc. As a little side hobby, I've taken up learning Pitman shorthand (new era) mainly for fun, but also with the hope that /some/ of it may come in handy with consec. note taking at some point in the future. This class is by far the hardest, and the teacher seems to enjoy choosing incredibly difficult speeches from people with non-standard accents. Very difficult, very embarassing for me, as most students have no issues in this class. What can you do when you didn't understand, or have forgotten what was said, and have no way to ask the speaker to repeat/clarify? This class makes me so nervous. Liaison interpreting: We have a mock conference/meeting every friday and are expected to prepare for it in the preceding week. The class is split into two groups: Chinese side, English side, and interpreters. The two sides discuss a topic for 2-3 hours whilst the interpreters take it in turns to sit one-by-one in between the two groups and act as a liaison interpreter. The pressure is noticeable, as the whole course is there watching you, and everyone is able to discern how good or bad your interpreting ability is (unlike when you're in the sim. interpreting booths, secluded and safe). Again, note taking is a skill that many of the students here employ. I would say to any westerner thinking about taking on a course like this, aside from having a very, very strong and well-rounded ability in Chinese, you should almost certainly also be practicing note-taking on speeches both in English and Chinese BEFORE starting a course (evidently with Chinese students in particular it would seem). I regret being under the impression I was going to learn note taking skills ON this course; I now know this of course is not the case, as pretty much everyone is already able to do this. Translation: We have both 'Chinese to English' and 'English to Chinese' classes. This needs no real explanation, its pretty much exactly what you would expect: teacher teaches theory, sets translation piece for homework, you translate it, get feedback, rinse and repeat. C-E very relaxing, the teacher seems to enjoy literary translation (lately lots of 紅樓夢 talk), E-C also ok but a much slower translation process for me. The translation process is private, however, so there's no real embarrassment to be had on this part of the course (so far...) All in all? I am loving the course, my classmates are fantastic people, very intelligent, hard working, inclusive, not 'immaturely' competitive if you understand what I mean, and importantly, very supportive as a community. Nobody treats me like a foreigner at all, I'm just another student. In that respect, theres not much leeway given, and as a result I feel like I'm ALWAYS being pushed to get up to their standard rather than being forgiven for being a 'foreigner'. Teaching is top notch, facilities are fantastic. And the fact that the course DOES have English-Chinese direction (as well as C-E) is a massive bonus if you ask me. My Chinese has improved rapidly, I can now read news probably 2-3 times faster than when I started the course. Why? Because I now read (mostly outloud, under my breath) for about 4-5 hours a day (as opposed to about 1 hour before the course). As you may be able to tell, I now live, breath and sleep in a world of studying speeches. I would not recommend this course for anyone who 'wants a life'. I feel obliged to say "sorry for the wall of text" - see you all in December.
  4. 2 points
    My experience is a bit particular and scholarly, but in editions of excavated texts, the style is to put a 楷書 version of the Chu script, then the modern equivalent in normal brackets (see pic for example). As the bit in brackets is very much an editorial decision, it is the equivalent of square brackets in English.
  5. 1 point
    My first guess is that this is simply a typo and the second 候 shouldn't be there. I suppose it is also possible that this is a cutesy way of saying 时候, but 1) I have never seen this (which does not mean it doesn't exist of course) and 2) Chinese Breeze is not likely to introduce rarely-seen words. So, probably a typo.
  6. 1 point
    Just downloaded it and opened it in Calibre (that ebook manager as I'm sure you know) and it's got Chinese for me. Thanks for the great link!
  7. 1 point
    If you enjoyed the big China-X course by the Harvard team of Prof. Peter Bol and Prof. William Kirby a couple years ago, here's another (smaller) one just starting. It's about the Tang. Lasts 15 weeks. Here is the official descriptive blurb: Here's a link for more information or to sign up: https://www.edx.org/course/china-part-3-cosmopolitan-tang-aristocratic-culture-2 I plan to take it.
  8. 1 point
    I have just signed up. Looks very interesting but have not started yet.
  9. 1 point
    https://youtu.be/5aFHzGpyK8I Chinese poem illustration. A poem about spring,peony , beauty and royal love. This poem could be treated as the vibes of the peak hours of Tang dynasty, of the royal love between 唐玄宗, the emperor and 杨贵妃, the queen,. The writing technique and wording also reflects the peak hours of the Tang dynasty, everything goes to its extremest level , that only the life in heaven could compete with, which can only be composed and described by Li Bai. 清平调·其一 李白 云想衣裳花想容, 春风拂槛露华浓。 若非群玉山头见, 会向瑶台月下逢。
  10. 1 point
    大家好! It's my first post here, so I wanna say hello to everyone I recieved Confucius Institute Scholarship and will be learning chinese at Tongji, starting from Semtember. I have a few questions, I hope some of you may help me and answer them 1.Is the department of chinese language good in Tongji? How big are the groups, etc.? 2. What about facilities on campus, are there any? Like gym, swimming pool or such. 3. What are the prices in the student's canteen? Is the food good there? 4. Are there many international conferences held in Tongji? 5. What countries do foreign students mostly come from? 6. Is the smog problematic on campus? I mean - do you feel that the quality of air sucks, or that is not really a problem? 7. How is the accomodation for foreign students like? Do we have single or double rooms? 8. Are there any food markets around campus?
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