Jump to content
Chinese-forums.com
Learn Chinese in China

Featured

  1. OneEye

    OneEye

    Members


    • Points

      21

    • Content Count

      1,823


  2. mungouk

    mungouk

    Members


    • Points

      16

    • Content Count

      829


  3. abcdefg

    abcdefg

    Members


    • Points

      9

    • Content Count

      6,158


  4. roddy

    roddy

    Administrators


    • Points

      9

    • Content Count

      19,773



Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 08/10/2019 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    And certainly doesn't prepare you for daily conversation in China . Words like 微信,支付宝 or anything related to apps (滴滴, 摩拜,抖音 ) don't appear which are hugely popular in modern Chinese society . Names of dishes don't feature much either. I seem to get asked daily 你今晚吃什么。 Naturally I wouldn't expect a language test to cover these topics ,nor HSK syllabus to include such words however it's more just to highlight that even if you flew past HSK 6 you could still struggle with everyday chit chat here in China. Although it wouldn't take long to get familiar with these popular conversations. Solely focusing on HSK tests and you're like a granny listening in on a millennial talking to their friends. She understands the language but no clue what they are on about. First year of studying Chinese I didn't hardly ventured outside , just stayed at home studying hard. A year later I could barely communicate. Decided that the text books were taking a back seat and I needed to actually talk to people.
  2. 2 points
    If you consistently can't do it, then you are not ready for that exercise. Spare yourself the frustration. In any case, what you've described is a really advanced skill and, in my opinion, completely and utterly unnecessary. I'm actually not sure I could do that in any language in which I can speak and be understood, including my native English. You only need to be correct at your currently natural own speed. Who cares if you sound like a "retard" if people understand you?? The purpose here is communication, not living up to some artificial performance standard.
  3. 2 points
    I don’t see other people recommending reality shows, so I’m probably in the minority in that the majority of my TV diet consists of reality shows. But personally I cannot stand scripted dramas because the scripts are usually terrible. A show I have been really enjoying lately is 心动的信号. The premise is that 6-8 people live in a house for 1 month and try to date each other. It is a strange mix of game show and dating show that is modeled after Terrace House on Netflix, which has elements of The Real World from MTV. This type of show has really taken China by storm since last year, and at the moment there are at least 3 different shows that run slight variations on the same format. Each season takes place in a different city. So far, they’ve covered Shanghai, Shenzhen, and Changsha. In general I can’t recommend these shows to learners because it’s pretty rough. The cast tends to be filled by locals, so they’ll occasionally slip into the local dialect (Shanghainese or Cantonese). I wouldn’t be able to follow along without the subtitles, and you need to be able to read pretty quickly. However, the long-awaited Beijing version started airing in July, and it might be the best entry point. All the cast members speak pretty standard Mandarin (with the Hong Kong cast member switching to English when she can’t think of the Mandarin word), and they don’t switch dialects. Vocabulary and word usage seem to be pretty close to how actual people speak on the street. Plenty of slang for sure. Possibly the most challenging listening part of the show might be the celebrity guests, who watch the show and comment on the proceedings (technically the framework of the show is that we’re watching celebrities who are watching a reality show starring non-celebrities). The celebrities tend to speak a bit faster, and one of them is Taiwanese with a noticeable accent. The plot (such as it is) makes sense and the character motivations are logical. The show visually looks better than 80% of the shows on Chinese TV. The cast members are charming and tend to have unusual jobs like sommelier, film producer, and toy designer. The celebrity guests, some of whom have starred in idol dramas, are actually pretty funny when they’re not reading lines from a terrible script.
  4. 1 point
    It is possible to pass any kind of exam in limited time period but do realize that your path to proficiency in a foreign language has much more to do with mere test. If one-year preparation means a going through of paper of previous examination in first 3 months, focusing on the words and expressions up to the level required by the HSK6 in the rest 9 months and making related absorption of Chinese materials from perspective of reading and listening, a year is enough. It is not only adequate for the test but also makes you ready to every possible communication you come across with the local Chinese. This is exactly what the test asks from you. I have seen so many Chinese students passing TEM8, English test for English major students, but they still couldn't manage a fluent communication with foreigners on the phone. And there are also many others passing IELTS with no particular review based on test, which is called 裸考. However, it doesn't mean they are not well prepared. It is just that they have made the application of English in IELTS level part of their daily life. Mind the time Chinese related you spend every day and make Chinese part of your life. I don't doubt a rocketing improvement in Chinese if the learner has an aching need for this language and enthusiasm in expression in Chinese. It is possible to make it a must in your life if you are crazy enough about it, by setting any interface or system language as Chinese, making a certain Chinese website to your taste a home page, finding a Chinese pen pal to make daily communication in Chinese possible.
  5. 1 point
    it seems to the same anywhere in China from reports on here. 1. Find an area you would like to live in (the rent a bike schemes can be useful to cover ground) or just wander around. Its worth considering places that are a bit away, but accessible by subway, bus. Don't know about nanjing but often in Beijing people want to be within walking distance so prices can be overly high. the apartment block near my language school was ridiculously high for a 2 bed (11000 for a month), 2. Go into any of the main chain store estate agents on the street and state you requirements (price , bedrooms etc). Places are always advertised better in the ads than they actually are. 3. Be prepared for them to show you everything that doesn't fit your requirements, so be forceful 4. go see it, you can probably negotiate a bit, depending on area, demand. 5. Don't be coerced into anything by an agent, there are apartments everywhere 6. Not sure about Nanjing but in Beijing, the tenant pays the agency fees (1 month) unless its a higher end place then then landlord can/may pay. I never paid an agency fee but that seems to be the exception rather than the norm. Depends on how fussy you are (i.e cleanliness) but you generally need to look at a lot as they are so many filthy dumps around. I looked at about 30 here but settling on one. I would just ask to see the 豪华 ones. The word 豪华 will be a complete exaggeration I would 100% stay in a hotel and find a place after you come and not try secure something become you come. If the apartment is empty they will want you moving in asap (i.e. the next day) I found the APPS only useful as rough guide, it's more trouble than it's worth to filter out all the fake adds, prices, photographs etc
  6. 1 point
    You don't need to speak 'that fast'. When you practice, you are trying to shadow and read the transcript, you are trying to read , listen and speak correctly all at the same time. That's actually very difficult. When I try to shadow, I don't emphasize on the reading. Listen, copy, check the words, use the pinyin to confirm tones. Listen again to where I thought I had the right tone but didn't. Shadow again. Shadow short sentences and do a lot of repeated listening because the listening will help you get a feel for when your tones are wrong more quickly.
  7. 1 point
    I also get reminders that I need to avoid complacency and be persistent with carefully pronouncing tones, but in the case of the woman, I wouldn't chalk that up to your language skills. I remember being in Starbucks one time, and I was looking to see what I wanted to order. Some tall Chinese dude came up behind me, and in perfect English (with an American accent) said 'are you in line? ' I stared at him for a good 4 seconds, mind completely blank. I had to process that this guy was a 华人. I did the exact thing Chinese will occasionally do to me. From that day on, I've been much more patient when having to repeat myself. Also, to the point about the children starting school without 普通话, they may be a bit behind the first year or so, but will only benefit them in the future. This cannot be an uncommon situation faced in China, as number of my Shanghainese friends said they only spoke上海话 until starting school.
  8. 1 point
    It is that classic gap fill conversation but, then again, in the U.K. the weather can literally change 3-4 times in a day, let alone be completely different day to day. When I was back last we had days that started cloudy, turned sunny, afternoon rain then strong winds. You really need to watch the weather. I feel like the spicy food and chopstick thing mostly comes from people who have little exposure or knowledge of foreigners. I admit it’s also ridiculous when they’ve already established you’ve lived in China for years yet still are amazed by chopstick use. If a Chinese 5 year old can do it ... then of course adults from other countries can learn how to. Equally, people don’t realise so much that western countries often have all kinds of cuisines and produce available. There’s that stereotype that “foreigners” eat burgers and pizzas everyday. I didn’t think anyone actually believed that until I worked with some people brand new to Beijing. Actually, I hear Chinese people talk about their ability to eat spicy food as well. It usually comes up fairly naturally though.
  9. 1 point
    I wonder what the distribution is like for passing a HSK level is a certain time frame. Everyone likes these success stories but these are the exception rather than an indication of the average learner. I have heard a lot of BS claims over the years, and one in particular was from my language school where they claimed a student (American not ABC) passed HSK 6 in a year. Everyone was naturally highly impressed until I questioned it publicly on a wechat group as to why this student had we chat moments going back 5 years written in pretty good Chinese. (The excuse was his wife was helping him, yeah right!) I quite dislike these blatant exaggerations as it's very misleading for prospective students who commit a lot to learn Chinese,such as moving country, large expenses, completely changing lifestyle, and so on. I'd say HSK 4 from scratch in one year is achievable by the average student but I think the distribution is quite wide. I certainly couldn't pass it within a year full time study nor could both of classmates (45 and 75). We were particularly slow though As for HSK5 within a year I really don't know if there are any stats available . I'd hazard a guess at 1 in 8 , 1 in 10 or so. Just a guess though. Also a 180 set as a pass mark is too low in my view.
  10. 1 point
    This kind of claim doesn't really tell us much unless you explain how many hours a week you were studying. I can't see anyone holding down a job and doing this, for example. Similarly, what does "from scratch" mean exactly? Did you already know Cantonese (I'm guessing English isn't your first language), or was this the first foreign language you ever learned? There's a big continuum there, and prior experience with learning other languages counts for a lot.
×
×
  • Create New...