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Showing content with the highest reputation since 04/14/2019 in Blog Comments

  1. 3 points
    I have only done one Masters; came in with some background knowledge. Others on the course were very fresh so it’s normal to see a big variation in the baseline levels of the students. Don’t let it get to you. 加油!
  2. 2 points
    When in the Mainland, look for opportunities to use transactional Chinese: -- Head around to several banks and try to open an account. Then go back for help when you can't get online banking or WeChat to work. -- Stop in at various mobile shops and learn about their current SIM card offers; you'll get different offers from different branches even in the same city. -- Line up at a train station ticket window and try to work out your trip to Urumqi and back, with various stops along the way. Have brief conversations with impatient travellers waiting behind you. -- Visit collectibles malls and talk to stamp dealers and the like about what they have to offer. Often these are retired folk with plenty of time to talk about their field. -- Lose your Metro ticket and negotiate how to get out of the system.
  3. 2 points
  4. 1 point
    Soon you'll find out... I don't know... I don't watch much TV these days... but maybe 一仆二主? or 欢乐颂?
  5. 1 point
    男人帮, yeah, I remember that show. You asked to help find a show. I found it based on your description and eventually watched it myself. Not a spoiler but it has two endings.
  6. 1 point
    It's very interesting to read how you are learning SI. I understand it can be quite challenging. A Chinese attorney who lives in the US said he had been involved in business deals where only ~30% of the translation was correct. These were business deals involving life sciences & pharmaceuticals, so terminology was a challenge (as you illustrated). His message was "use good translators." I expect those he was referring to were not trained translators, but just those who did so as part of their jobs because they were perceived as having good language skills.
  7. 1 point
    Got me beat! Nothing sprang to mind and searching around made-up candidates hasn't come up with anything likely. I await the reveal with interest!
  8. 1 point
    Sounds like you are learning lots. Hope this semester is similarly fruitful.
  9. 1 point
    Thank you! I would say my Chinese has improved drastically. That's not to say my Chinese is any good yet, but it has certainly gotten better. When I get discouraged at how difficult it is, or at my lack of understanding, struggles with grammar etc., what always encourages me is looking back at where I was compared to where I am now. I haven't started reading Chinese literature yet. I believe we start with native material at some point in 3rd year. The most advanced I have gone by myself is reading a book for young people. It was doable, but still quite challenging. I was actually sometimes able to get through a page or two without coming across a character I didn't recognize (although of course some pages would then have a ton that I didn't know), but what slowed me down was not knowing what words meant, even though I could read the character.
  10. 1 point
    Welcome back, @js6426! How much would you say your Chinese has improved over the last year and a half of school? Have you started reading Chinese literature?
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