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Showing content with the highest reputation since 03/30/2020 in Posts

  1. 7 points
    Here in SW Connecticut - adjacent to but not right in the current US epicenter of NYC - things are busy but not utterly insane AFAICT; good supplies of almost everything at grocery stores (even toilet paper), hospitals are very busy but still enough PPE for the moment and nobody's wearing garbage bags (though a couple of hospitals have put up emergency tent facilities in parking lots to deal with the pending influx), vast majority of deaths appear to have been very old and/or unwell, and the governor (who's been in office for 2 years and up until now had kind of a poor track record, having picked a lot of fights with a lot of entrenched interests and gotten his butt kicked each time) has generally done a great job rolling out new measures at the earliest possible point people were ready to accept them. Restaurants closed 2 weeks ago, and school closures started happening at a town-by-town level almost 3 weeks ago and they've been closed statewide for 2 weeks, with the earliest possible reopening date currently pegged at May 1st. Commuter rail to NYC has started running on a severely reduced schedule so that should hopefully stem some of the new cases coming out from there; well-to-do New Yorkers have apparently been snatching up every short-term rental they can find in the suburbs (and farther out, e.g. in the Hamptons) but we don't have very many of those here and most people aren't interested in renting their house to somebody for 3 months so I doubt there'll be too many new cases introduced that way. And it's mostly single-family detached housing around here, so frankly with all of the major places of gathering closed there's not much room left for it to spread. Both kids' schools have been making good efforts at distance learning; older kid's school has been posting daily lessons / videos / activities / etc but without anything real-time or the expectation that we'll do any of it that day or do all of it at any point - definitely the way to go when people are trying to juggle homeschooling with work - while my preschooler has had daily Zoom meetings with his classmates which are again purely optional and not necessarily *teaching* that much but are at least a tiny bit of socialization with other kids his age to remind him how to do that. They seem to be learning at least as much with our little bit of homeschooling as they were learning at school before, so I'm not really worried about long-term consequences of this for them, but obviously we're luckier than most people and I think everybody is frankly way too casual about the dire consequences long-term school closures can have on less fortunate kids; there needs to be a conversation about how we can reopen schools without them turning into viral hotbeds, e.g. by restructuring schedules so that kids stay in the same room with the same peers all day and thus can only spread the virus to that room and not the entire school. Re masks, there's been pretty consistent messaging in the US that we don't have enough masks and you should save them for front-line medical workers; until we have masks in such abundance that nobody worries about that problem anymore, it's going to be very hard to remove the social stigma around them. But once there are boxes of masks piled up at the front of every grocery store / drugstore / Costco / etc, I think we can get people to start wearing them pretty quickly; suspicion of mask-wearing is widespread but shallow, and a couple of videos of Taylor Swift or whoever donning a mask and explaining why everyone else ought to do so would change minds in short order.
  2. 6 points
    Just start wearing them yourself. You can even make them yourself (see my earlier post). The more Caucasian people wear them, the earlier it becomes the norm. I have started wearing them a couple of days ago. Folks either ignore you, give you a wide berth or eye you suspiciously. No hostility. I feel cashiers at the grocery store really appreciated it!
  3. 5 points
    I would be glad to go back into the trenches. The Texas Medical Board passed a regulation allowing physicians with expired licenses to return to active practice to meet increased staffing needs during this epidemic. I called them and the person I spoke to on the phone said this would apply only if the license had expired less than two years ago. Mine, unfortunately, expired much longer ago and would not be covered by this "licensing amnesty." Bill Bishop's Sinology blog yesterday had a very moving article about a 73-year old Chinese doctor (Li Lanjuan) who returned to the front lines in Wuhan. At an early age she was a "barefoot" village doctor. Subsequently became a specialist in viral illness. She was courageous and tireless. A real role model 好榜样。
  4. 4 points
    I finished watching 《想见你》, and I think it deserves all the accolades it has received. Although the first few episodes are a little slow going, they set up the rest of the story nicely, which consists of a mixture of a modern story dealing with loss, a coming of age drama, a mystery, and a suspenseful thriller. It contains some time-travel-ish elements, but all in a non sci-fi way. With so many interconnecting plot-threads, I was worried about them messing up the ending, but they handled it really well. One of my favourite ever Chinese language shows for sure. I also just finished off another highly-rated Taiwanese drama, 《我们与恶的距离》. This joint HBO production tackles the topic of child killings, looking at the effects on the family of the victims, the families of the perpetrators, the lawyers who represent them, the media and society as a whole. If you're looking for a feelgood show to pass the time during lockdown, then this obviously isn't it. However, it's a great show, even if it is at times uncomfortable viewing. Very well acted, and at 10 episodes there is very little padding too. Recommended.
  5. 4 points
    Some of the incorporated suburbs of Dallas have recently passed a "shelter in place" order that means everyone needs to stay home if they are not going to and from their "essential" jobs or shopping for groceries/prescription pharmaceuticals. Other suburbs nearby have adopted a "libertarian" stance in which they decline to do that because it would infringe citizen rights. It has created a patchwork quilt. The small town in which I live has been a little more relaxed up to now. Many restaurants open for takeout. I have personally found grocery stores to be clean and orderly. They have hired quite a few temporary workers to wipe down the shelves and put up arriving supplies. They no longer have 27 brands of breakfast cereal, which I always found somewhat ridiculous in the first place. Fruit and vegetables and meat are coming in fresh, again with slightly less selection, but no way could it be considered a hardship. The local hospital (where I worked for many years) is seeing patients more or less as usual, with temperature screening as one enters the premises. No tent on the parking lot. More personal protective gear in use. Texas has started way too late and has dedicated way to little effort into preventive medical measures. I doubt they can ever catch up. People arriving from Louisiana are required to self quarantine, as mentioned above. Lots of the things the officials are doing now seem to be mainly for show. They are closing the barn door after they cows have escaped and scattered. I am having a new roof put on. Spoke with the contractor an hour ago (Monday morning) and he said everything is still on schedule. They will bring out the new shingles and other materials this afternoon, and will do the actual work tomorrow and the next day if it's not raining. He said he still has adequate labor crews. (Construction is deemed an "essential occupation.") Banks have closed their lobbies, as have most other businesses. Drive-through service is still available for check cashing and deposits. E-banking is less developed in small-town Texas than it is in China. Nobody here wears masks. Hand sanitizer has been sold out for over a month. I still meet people when out and about who want to shake hands. They give me a look when I decline. Happened as recently as yesterday. Republicans and Democrats are squabbling about how to administer a big, headline-grabbing aid package. So the actual grass roots response gets delayed. An ER doctor friend in Atlanta told me last week that during his last shift his hospital had 31 needy candidates for each available ventilator. They are having to do very difficult triage. Despite having written guidelines available, the burden falls on the doctor explaining things to the relatives. Texas Medical Association, of which I am still a member, has prevailed on the legislature to allow retired physicians to return to limited practice, mainly doing telemedicine handling less pressing patient inquiries and concerns. I phoned them and learned that the regulation only applies to physicians who retired 2 years ago or less. I hung up my spurs/stethoscope a decade ago, so unfortunately cannot contribute in that manner. (Probably a good thing since I'm woefully/dangerously out of date.) MODERATOR: What do you think about splitting these last couple of posts off into a separate thread? One dedicated to Coronavirus response in other countries. Perhaps as compared with China. In fact I will start such a thread and cross-post this item. Thank you.
  6. 3 points
    Not posted on here for years but here goes. While there's some fairly awful stuff going on around the world at the moment and we're currently in lockdown, it's given me an opportunity to do something I've wanted to do for years - pick up the Chinese books again. In fact, I'm astonished with how much I've enjoyed it after almost 20 years. I've always wanted to do a HSK exam and I might even give it a go this year. I realise the HSKs aren't the be all and end all but it's still a good goal (as per thread title). Normally live life at a million miles an hour, it is just amazing to be able to completely wind down, re-evaluate life and do stuff that has been on the back burner for so long. For the first time I can really see the possibility of heading for 3/4 months study in China, perhaps that will have to wait until a 2021 thread - looking at maybe Kunming or Chengdu.
  7. 3 points
    Some green shoots perhaps... I've been informed that Zhejiang Provincial Government have announced a schedule for students to return to their campuses: Universities are to prepare for return late April (each institution's plans subject to approval by Provincial Education Dept) Final-year junior/senior high school students: 13 April Other school students: 20 April Kindergartens: 6 May Anyone outside of China can't return yet of course (including teachers), due to the border closures. The Gaokao university entrance exams to be taken by around 10 million students have been put back to July for this year.
  8. 3 points
    My word of the day is both Chinese and its English counterpart: 鼻翼, the 'alae' of the nose. It appears in some dictionaries as the 'nostrils', the 鼻孔, but this seems to be inaccurate. The word 鼻翼 seems to turn up a lot in plastic surgery descriptions, and the same seems to be true of the word 'alae' (interestingly, I feel like I have heard of 'the wings of the nose' before at some point, which matches the Chinese here). While I was previously unfamiliar with the term ala, I realised I knew 'septum' in English, but not Chinese, which for those interested turns out to be 鼻中隔
  9. 3 points
    I polled some Chinese friends, and got the following WeChat 订阅号 suggestions: 《地球知识局》- writes about people, places, and things of interest around the world, such as how the Panama Canal is operated marijuana culture in the Netherlands 《张家玮写字的地方》- writes about the NBA and miscellaneous topics such as the author's experience of being a journalist in China during the advent of digital media 《物种日历》- writes about biology and ecology, such as ant/plant symbiotic relationships how demand for TCM is endangering vaquita in the Gulf of California how a speculation bubble in the late aughts nearly wiped out wild Chinese orchids 《混乱博物馆》- writes about popular science, such as what centrifugal force is
  10. 3 points
    All together now: Did you ever know that you're my hero And everything I would like to be? I can fly higher than an eagle For you are Imron beneath my wings
  11. 3 points
    New release is up, it includes: Updated CC-CEDICT to use the latest version Added word length column to the wordlist view Fixed bug where words that spanned a line weren't highlighting correctly macOS: Added support for standard PageUp and PageDown keyboard shortcuts with Fn Up and Fn Down macOS: Added support for system-wide dark mode macOS: Ctrl-left click will now display the popup menu in the textview macOS: Fixed bug where dictionary definitions weren't showing in dark mode @roddy you can now sort by word length using the word length column (hidden all the way on the right so you may need to scroll). Searching for individual characters not in words is going to be a bit trickier than I expected so didn't make it in to this release.
  12. 3 points
    i’m sitting this thing out in new york because there was a time when it seemed safer here than asia 😂 frequent sounds of ambulance sirens flying down empty streets. with regards to Cuomo and the idea of locking down the tri-state area, he said something to the effect of “it’s not who we are” - i.e. infringing on civil liberties or immoral, take your pick... and more importantly that it would be ineffective in controlling the flow of the virus. he said as soon as you declare a quarantine then you have a flood of people leaving the area, as we saw in wuhan, and the virus will spread regardless. better to strongly advise the public to isolate themselves in his opinion. also i saw an earlier post about how he’s on the ropes politically because of all the impending deaths in the state. on the contrary Cuomo is very highly regarded now following a series of press conferences he gave illustrating the problems facing new york and what he’s doing about them. he and Fauci are generally considered to be the only adults left in the room to help americans now. he has become enormously popular in the US overall and if he gets through this without unforeseen downturn he has a good shot at running for president in the future. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eD1eg3vMO2A
  13. 3 points
    I'm in the US, a two hour drive from New Orleans. Because I work with blind veterans in a low vision clinic located on the hospital grounds, my job is deemed "essential" and I am still required to go to work after passing two checkpoints to screen out fever and possible contact with COVIDs at the main gate. I just go to work and I go home. My ex-spouse is in infectious diseases and my ex-brother-in-law is a pulmonologist with whom I maintain contacts and their twitter feeds/Facebook posts are significantly dire.
  14. 3 points
    估计再有几分钟就到了吧。 I think (estimate) will be there in a few more minutes. 再晚了我们就来不及看表演了。 If we're any later than that, we won't be there in time to watch the performance.
  15. 2 points
    Hey everyone, I would need some quite urgent advice. I had been admitted to study one semester at the Renmin University in Beijing. I got my X2 (short term) - Visa as required, so I was quite content. However then Corona happened and it become unclear, whether the semester would actually be taking place or not. Thus I first travelled to Vietnam. Then I got the message, that the next day the chinese border would close (27th.3). So I rushed over the border, basically thinking that if the semester would be taking place that would be all right and if not I could probably try to sign up at a language school, although I would prefer learning chinese on my own without restrictions of a set town or stuff like that. I was let over the border and am now in Quarantine for 8 more days or so, but after I that do not exactly know what my options are. I understand the X2 thus, that I do not need a residence permit, but I read stuff about “registering your residence at the police station, health checkup”, etc. So my questions are: - Would it be possible to just grab a shared flat or something (or in worst case go to a hostel for some time) and learn there on my own? What exactly would I need to provide to immigration authorities or such? Whom would I contact for that? - If the first does not work, could I just ask a language school to sign me up? I have read, that that would work, if the first school would be fine with that (I imagine they are, since they do not do a semester after all). But could I basically just arrive at the new town and register my residence there, after making stuff clear with my new language school? Or do I still need to tell some people in Beijing my situation and get a permission or something to go somewhere else? - I read different stuff about staying in a hotel/hostel. My current understanding is as follows: there are some hotels/hostels, who have a specific license to host foreigners. If I stay at a place like that, it will be more convenient, because I will not have to do anything about the police station stuff. I could also go to other hotels/hostels without such license, but than the "register at the local police station stuff" would apply. This is kind of important too me as well, since I (eventually) want to live in a "smaller" part of china, where it might be difficult to find (cheap) hotels with a license. Thanks a lot in advance Jona
  16. 2 points
  17. 2 points
    It’s the most visible. 90% of non-chinese in HK central district are now wearing masks in public areas although the new case figures haven’t exploded. A nice change from a couple of weeks ago. Even if it may only have a slight effect, it’s better than having one extra case. Every place is doing a temperature check now. Customers in shops, at the post office, eating at lunch ... every person gets a temperature check with a device pointed at your forehead. It’s pretty inaccurate. I had two checks within the space of five minutes and had a temperature difference of 1 degree being hypothermic for one of them. I suppose it catches people who have a raging fever but I doubt many of those will be out and about. Dubious on the spot effectiveness but the public are happy to comply. In restaurants, there now also has to be spacing between people so every other table can’t be used. I was at McDonalds and got a bit concerned with the lady coughing into her tissue a few times (and not the discreet type of cough) two tables away. It was even more surprising when another customer asked to sit on the same table as me to eat his food. We are limited to no more than four people to a table. I finished up quickly and left. Relatives ask me about working in the medical facility as a perceived risky environment. With the low case rates and the amount of screening going on, my workplace is very safe. After all, when standing next to someone in public, we don’t ask if they have a fever, recent travel, got a fever or cough etc whereas we do that at hospital. However, in those severely affected places around the world, medical environments are high risk areas. I have suggested to a couple of people to shave off their beards. From my perspective, beards can harbour viral material with a big surface area and the face will be less easy to clean - it is not evidence based but an action based on trying to think of being comprehensive. The suggestion was taken very well and the wife of one of them was very happy not to need to moan at her husband! The frequent cleaning of common surfaces in Hong Kong is good. Every hour or couple of hours. Lift buttons , door handles etc. No doubt some areas are less good at it. I don’t think that’s so easy to be comprehensive in western cities. The HK government was pretty quick on stopping schools and implementing work from home. Kids haven’t been to school for over two months now. That would account for a big decrease in public transport usage.
  18. 2 points
    I can think of a couple of other reasons, though there may be more. First, the city is compact enough and the number of daily new cases few enough -- around 40 recently -- so that tracing and isolating contacts remains feasible. Second, there were some 300 deaths from SARS in Hong Kong, so everyone knew what this could become and took precautions from the start. Without that history, I think people elsewhere were largely caught off guard by the seriousness of the epidemic, and began to react too late.
  19. 2 points
    I actually did stuff, so I guess it's time for an update. After spending some weeks getting used to stay at home life, I've started memorizing the 說文 radicals. I'm trying the Leitner system, and so far so good. I don't ever remember using flashcards in school, so this is a major experiment for me. Thank you! Not sure when I'll 通臨石門頌,but 通臨說文部首 has been on my mind, especially once I know what they all are. I wonder if I should start a blog here and post some calligraphy here as well.
  20. 2 points
    In Feng Feng's blog from Wuhan, following the lifting of restrictions of travel out of Wuhan, writes: 北京拒绝湖北的人入京的信息,从昨天传到今天。我一直不敢相信,直到现在,我仍觉得不可信。因为,我实在不知道一个健康的湖北人和一个健康的非湖北人有什么差别。如果北京真的拒绝湖北人进京,那是湖北人的倒霉,却并不是湖北人的耻辱。耻辱的是提出这个建议和采纳这个建议的人。当然,也是文明的耻辱。很多年后,我们回头看,原来,2020年,我们的文明史是在这样的一个刻度上。所以,我现在还是不愿意相信这一事实,不过它却值得记录下来。 In the highlighted text, does it mean that she is not willing to believe that this is a fact. (in other words, she thinks that it is a false rumor) Or does it mean she is not willing to to believe this fact (It's a true fact, but she is going to disbelieve it.) ? My reading would be the later, and I would say that if she meant the former she would have written: 。。。不相信这是一个事实。 Is this correct or not?
  21. 2 points
    I have been auto-transcribing audio sources and creating Anki decks automatically for several months. Does anyone want to post links to some freely available audio resources and I'll see if I can create and upload some decks to AnkiWeb and share the links here. Clear speech without overlapping speakers works better and only one language.
  22. 2 points
    barrier protection and public. If you can’t do barrier protection, then keep a distance away from people. People didn’t follow social distancing orders because they think asymptomatic people don’t spread virus - this is an unknown variable. The trouble with the previous advice is it made people not think of keeping a distance symptoms or no symptoms. Definitely. Already mentioned In my post is LSHTM - London School of Health and Tropical Medicine . 😉 It is british and up there with John Hopkins for public health 😉 If WHO change, it’s going to set the cat amongst the pigeons. The panel's chair, Prof David Heymann, told BBC News that the new research may lead to a shift in advice about masks. The former director at the WHO explained: "The WHO is opening up its discussion again looking at the new evidence to see whether or not there should be a change in the way it's recommending masks should be used." https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-52126735
  23. 2 points
    We've all learned from that, the next time around I'm sure the CDC, WHO et al. will announce that toilet paper is actually not effective for post-defecation cleansing, unless you have diarrhea. In other news, Chinese county goes into coronavirus lockdown as country tries to get back to work amid fear of second wave I think we're going to see more of this going forward.
  24. 2 points
    surgical- type masks aren’t complicated and can be easily reproduced at home if there are none in supply. i see them coming back onto the market, however. it’s just the n95s that are in a critical shortage. i saw the japanese government today recommend that every japanese person wear a simple cloth mask with ear loops which can be washed / sanitized and re-used easily. they plan to mail every japanese citizen 2 of these masks for everyday wear. not as cool as the hong kong kids’ masks, but probably a good idea.
  25. 2 points
    I just received a "care package" of N95 masks from a good friend in Kunming. Am so thankful they arrived safely. More precious than gold.
  26. 2 points
    @roddy -- Report from a displaced 中国通 in America. Getting by in the Time of the Virus. Some of the incorporated suburbs of Dallas have recently passed a "shelter in place" order that means everyone needs to stay home if they are not going to and from their "essential" jobs or shopping for groceries/prescription pharmaceuticals. Other suburbs nearby have adopted a "libertarian" stance in which they decline to do that because it would infringe citizen rights. It has created a patchwork quilt. The small town in which I live has been a little more relaxed up to now. Many restaurants open for takeout. I have personally found grocery stores to be clean and orderly. They have hired quite a few temporary workers to wipe down the shelves and put up arriving supplies. They no longer have 27 brands of breakfast cereal, which I always found somewhat ridiculous in the first place. Fruit and vegetables and meat are coming in fresh, again with slightly less selection, but no way could it be considered a hardship. The local hospital (where I worked for many years) is seeing patients more or less as usual, with temperature screening as one enters the premises. No tent on the parking lot. More personal protective equipment in use. Texas has started way too late and has dedicated way to little effort into preventive medical measures. I doubt they can ever catch up. People arriving from Louisiana are required to self quarantine, as mentioned above. Lots of the things the officials are doing now seem to be mainly for show. They are closing the barn door after they cows have escaped and scattered. I am having a new roof put on. Spoke with the contractor an hour ago (Monday morning) and he said everything is still on schedule. They will bring out the new shingles and other materials this afternoon, and will do the actual work tomorrow and the next day if it's not raining. He said he still has adequate labor crews. (Construction is deemed an "essential occupation.") Banks have closed their lobbies, as have most other businesses. Drive-through service is still available for check cashing and deposits. E-banking is less developed in small-town Texas than it is in China. Nobody here wears masks. Hand sanitizer has been sold out for over a month. I still meet people when out and about who want to shake hands. They give me a look when I decline. Happened as recently as yesterday. Republicans and Democrats are squabbling about how to administer a big, headline-grabbing aid package. So the actual grass roots response gets delayed. An ER doctor friend in Atlanta told me last week that during his last shift his hospital had 31 needy candidates for each available ventilator. They are having to do very difficult triage. Despite having written guidelines available, the burden falls on the doctor explaining things to the relatives. Texas Medical Association, of which I am still a member, has prevailed on the legislature to allow retired physicians to return to limited practice, mainly doing telemedicine handling less pressing patient inquiries and concerns. I phoned them and learned that the regulation only applies to physicians who retired 2 years ago or less. I hung up my spurs/stethoscope a decade ago, so unfortunately cannot contribute in that manner. (Probably a good thing since I'm woefully/dangerously out of date.) Yesterday I dug out some Chinese textbooks for review. Also look forward to improving my penmanship/calligraphy.
  27. 2 points
    as much as that may be the concern, it isn’t an excuse for lying to the public, saying masks aren’t effective at preventing transmission. i can’t wait to hear the CDC’s eventual apology for this mess... ”sorry for producing such garbage tests, and also you all actually should have been wearing some kind of mask since january”
  28. 2 points
    Although only recent articles are directly accessible from the BBC中文 portal, they do keep older articles. I'd suggest googling BBC中文 + any topic you're interested in, in order to find the links to those older articles. And additionally, once you've reached an interesting article, it will contain links to similar articles.
  29. 2 points
    I'm quite pleased with myself..... I found it! It is called youdao 有道. I translated pertinent sentences into Chinese with Google Translate and inserted the Chinese text into Google and did an image search and recognized the company logo! LOL... I loved it because I could click on some Chinese PDFs I have and get pop-up definitions of characters and many times with pinyin too.
  30. 2 points
    appears to be a badly written 爱 'love'
  31. 2 points
    All these food tips are just small contributions to a good recovery. They are very minor relative to good sleep, and maintain, if possible, some exercise to keep the blood flowing. In addition, maintaining a generally healthy and varied diet is generally good enough, though the added Chinese advice on what food to avoid can help. The best way to understand it is to understand toxicity. Toxicity The Chinese food advice from a TCM standpoint can further help. The best way to translate the Chinese advice to Western logic is to look at toxicity levels. It makes sense to avoid food with higher toxicity levels (though still within safety thresholds for humans), especially those that are known to sometimes case skin issues (e.g. crab/prawns) or case general allergies (eggs/nuts). After surgery the immuun system is sometimes less strong, so certain allergic reactions may appear, which you normally don't experience. Then there's the concept of cooling and heating food, which I explain below. Cooling vs warming In China, food and beverages are also classified in 'cooling' versus 'warming/heating'. After surgery, it's generally recommend to avoid cooling food and have more warming food. Same is for beverages. In work in the field of tea, and I never recommend to drink very cooling teas such as Honeysuckle tea after surgeries and pregnancies. A ginger tea would be much better to keep the blood flowing and support recovery.
  32. 2 points
    Its taken three months of daily practice, but I just had my first full on conversation over wechat using only Cangjie to type. It was stressfull, full on and I so nearly switched back to pinyin to keep up with the pace like I usually do...but I didn't, for the first time! I've noticed my typing speed has increased a lot in the last few weeks, which is obviously a really great feeling. Nine times out of ten I can now correctly type out a character I've never typed/seen before without having to check the dictionary - the feeling of freedom is great, and my character retention for lesser seen/used characters is helping massively in learning new words (神龕, 螽斯, 孱弱, 駕馭 are examples off the top of my head of some recent ones that have finally stuck) @oceancalligraphy Enjoying following your goals progress. I saw your 石門頌 on the subreddit yesterday, looking really nice - would love to see you 通臨 and post it at some point in the future!
  33. 2 points
  34. 2 points
    A church in Washington state asked it's choir members to practice as usual on 10 March. They provided hand sanitizer and asked people not to hug. 60 members showed up for the practice. The results were terrible: The LA Times reports: Nearly three weeks later, 45 have been diagnosed with COVID-19 or ill with the symptoms, at least three have been hospitalized, and two are dead." It's an unfortunate experiment on the results of a what libertarian stances might yield. (We don't need no social distancing...." said with great irony) It also shows the importance of respiratory transmission. The article also notes: "The World Health Organization has downplayed the possibility of transmission in aerosols, stressing that the virus is spread through much larger “respiratory droplets,” which are emitted when an infected person coughs or sneezes and quickly fall to a surface." https://www.latimes.com/world-nation/story/2020-03-29/coronavirus-choir-outbreak
  35. 2 points
    I find it interesting (in a bad way) how doctors of different countries react to triage, either the prospect of it or the actual practice. I first saw it reported from Italy, heart-broken doctors who were in tears as they explained they had to choose who to help and who to let die, and were warning other countries to act now or it would be too late. Today I read about a doctor in Brazil, who was well aware of the shortages in her hospital and dreading the prospect of doing triage, it was horrifying to her. Then on the very same page of the newspaper the fairly sober daily 'diary of a hospital nurse', where the nurse explained how 80-year-olds don't come out of intubation well, and every COVID-19 patient who came in had explained to them what the short-term and long-term consequences of an IC stay would be. Basically old sick people are asked to step aside, both in their own interest (they would not recover from an IC stay) and in the interest of other patients who will need the bed & the ventilator. The nurse did not use the term 'triage' for this at all, but that is basically what it is. And then your story of a Texas doctor who is already doing triage, and this is the first I read about triage in the US.
  36. 2 points
    Right, okay. I'm not an international policy expert, so this is just armchair analysis. The virus is in China already. The government says it has contained the epidemic, but even if you believe that (I don't, Chinese statistics are not reliable), it's not over. So it's not like the disease will not come to China if China closes the borders. It even originated in China, no foreigners needed. Furthermore, the number of people entering the country was already reduced to a trickle and anyone who did fly in was quarantined for two weeks. So why close the border? At the same time, there is a propaganda battle going on between Chinese state media and Trump. Trump insists on calling it 'the Chinese virus' even though reasonable people ask him not to; Chinese state media are trying harder and harder to have people believe the virus came to Wuhan from the US. All this on top of the existing global struggle for top dog that has been going on for a few years now. Closing the border is then kind of a power play: we don't need you foreigners/we blame you foreigners for contaminating our country. Although China would of course not have suddenly closed its borders if there were no pandemic going on, the pandemic is just the immediate cause, not the full reason.
  37. 2 points
    有 is sometimes used as a 'dummy verb' to represent other verbs, in this case it could have the meaning of ‘過’. Agree with edelweis's translations. Minor typo on 'will' (we'll).
  38. 2 points
    The 公众号 “最爱历史” might be worth a look, their posts are well written, varied and most importantly not related to current affairs. I have a read every now and again for a change
  39. 1 point
    Would help to know relationships too but implication is they're all members of same family, appears to be child and mother. Going with that as an assumption: What about dad? Your dad is... You want to know where is he/what's he at? [人 can be used as a shorthand question to query status/whereabouts of someone] He's building a/fixing the pigsty. Well then I'll wait a couple of days before I come back to get it [literally just come back after two days but linking it to the news that dad is busy] ETA Just edited as saw I'd missed line three is from speaker of lines 2 and 4
  40. 1 point
    The mainland version split the episodes in half, making 26 thirty minute episodes in total, compared to 13 in the Taiwanese original. It didn't feel at all awkward, and 30 minutes is good for one sitting (although I was watching two a day by the end). The show really starts to take off from episode 5 (or 3 in the Taiwanese version). In fact, I enjoyed it so much that I have already watched it a second time (albeit having it on in the background while doing other things). It's a little bit like Fight Club or The Sixth Sense, in that it's worth watching a second time round just to get the details you missed the first time (although unlike those, there isn't one single shocking twist at the end, it's more like a constant questioning of reality).
  41. 1 point
    I can't help with the specific visa conundrum I'm afraid (have you asked your university yet? They probably also don't know anything for sure, but then at least they have you on the map). I do know about registering and hostels. If a hostel or hotel is allowed to host foreigners, they will do the registering for you. They have a system at their check-in desk that makes this easy, and it means nobody needs to go to the police station. If a hostel is not allowed to host foreigners, they will turn you away and not rent you a room, because they do not want hassle. There is no middle way where you stay in a hostel and go to the police yourself. If you rent a room or apartment from a landlady/landlord, that is when you need to go to the police station to register. Bring your rental contract, your passport, any other paperwork and perhaps your landlady/landlord.
  42. 1 point
  43. 1 point
    Haven't done this so far, I started writing a journal instead, but only really wrote in it up to the end of February. I find it hard to sit down and write something non-trivial, it would probably help to have regular assignments. Other than that, I'm keeping up with my plan, on my second (short) novel now:)
  44. 1 point
    Just noticed this: WHO considers changing guidance on wearing face masks Edit: Whoops, same info as in @Flickserve's link above.
  45. 1 point
    hi guys, I've found these two sentences: 男:方向肯定没错,估计再有几分钟就到了吧。 女:再晚了我们就来不及看表演了。 I'm not sure how to translate the 再 in both sentences. Is it maybe some kind of grammar structure? Did some reseach on this but couldn't find anything. Cheers Beo
  46. 1 point
    While I have not used the service, I don't see anything offensive about the name. For a service that provides a structured guide on how to study the name seems quite suitable. It's not claiming to be the only blueprint, just a blueprint that you can follow. They have other marketing claims that I take issue with, and the guarantee appears to only be if you're not satisfied with the product/service within 30 days, but personally, I think the name itself is quite good. As mentioned in your other thread, I agree that the most important factor in learning Chinese is the student putting in the time and effort. No, but they have a 30 day money back guarantee, so if you're feeling adventurous you could always try it and see what it's like, and then come back and provide feedback
  47. 1 point
    Thats a great spot, I completely missed the similarity of the name with 郭启德 who I even listed in my vocab for the prologue. Interesting... I totally missed 王水, think I must have just skipped over it while trying to figure out what 酸雾 acid fog was. I'm hoping I understood the following bolded term correctly as another type of advanced wearable tech, something along the lines of an 'induction membrane': "男人们赤裸着上身,炫耀着身上劣质的感应薄膜,他们戴着山寨版增强现实眼镜,躺在填满损毁显示器和废弃塑料的花岗岩灌溉渠坝上,享受着每天中不多的闲暇。" If so, seems like the author is going for a direct contrast with a description of Scott only a few paragraphs later: "他试图站着不动,但汗液不停地渗出,与空气中成分不明的化学物质溶合,形成一层黏度极高的薄膜,将皮肤与衣服紧紧粘连,让他艰于行动。" Perhaps this is the author trying to subliminally reveal Scott's empathy with the '垃圾人'? Thought it was interesting to pick out anyway, even if I'm not sure what the purpose is yet... My vocab: 二噁英 1,4-Dioxin and 呋喃 Furan (suprised to see these two, we had to learn lots of these for interpreting speeches on environmental action, the Basel convention etc) 铬 chromium 虚与委蛇 pretend to care/sympathise/be interested 放诸四海皆准 something universally true 抿嘴 purse ones lips 绝缘线 insulated wire 神经末梢 nerve ending 尺蠖 inchworm (caterpillar of the Geometer moth, from wiki: "Their scientific name derives from the Ancient Greek geo γῆ or γαῖα "the earth", and metron μέτρων "measure" in reference to the way their larvae, or "inchworms", appear to "measure the earth" as they move along in a looping fashion." nice description of a crawling limb) 硅胶 silica gel 硅油 silicone oil 耳蜗 cochlea 开膛手杰克 Jack the Ripper (how did I not know this one?) 蚀刻 etch 无计可施 at wits end 等离子切割枪 plasma cutter 花岗岩灌溉渠坝 granite irrigation ditch/embankment
  48. 1 point
    Nobody's telling you to reduce the amount of work YOU do. We're asking you to let us help you more efficiently, by telling us where we might find problems. If you'd said I'm not sure about "咱不觊觎这个名分啊" at 12m:20s, could someone listen to it for me, we can do that. But not many people are able to listen closely to an entire 15 minute audio, while checking the transcript looking for mistakes, when there might not be any mistakes.
  49. 1 point
    So, you're saying that the 荡妇 who is described at the beginning is the widow at the grave at the end? In that case I misread the whole story. I thought the 荡妇 (fluzzy, slut, prostitute) was being tormented by the husband's ghost because she is the murderer, and the policeman chases the ghost back to its grave where he discovers the widow and believes incorrectly that she is the murderer. So now it all becomes clear, and I can see that your reading is correct. She is just trying to talk herself out of a bad situation.
  50. 1 point
    I'm on a lovely long holiday in Greater China. On the basis that if it's greater, I should go see it. Reminds me, in China, smoking is worse for your health.
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