Jump to content
Chinese-forums.com
Learn Chinese in China

Featured

  1. mungouk

    mungouk

    Members


    • Points

      17

    • Content Count

      1,948


  2. realmayo

    realmayo

    Members


    • Points

      12

    • Content Count

      4,035


  3. Luxi

    Luxi

    Members


    • Points

      11

    • Content Count

      886


  4. 大块头

    大块头

    Members


    • Points

      11

    • Content Count

      507


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 04/04/2021 in Posts

  1. To improve my listening skills, I decided to listen to all TCB lessons. Starting with HSK 1 lessons (approx. 900) as extensive listening practice, I just completed all HSK 1 lessons in TCB. The great thing about TCB is that they do not cling to the HSK levels rigidly. So, even though the lessons were supposed to be HSK 1, all HSK 1 lessons combined contained about 2687 unique words and 1418 unique characters (see stats below). The great thing about listening to them was that they were really fairly easy, but almost every lesson had 1-2 words I did not know
    6 points
  2. I'm subscribed to about a dozen different Chinese YouTube channels, but my favorite, by far, is 李永乐老师. His content is extremely interesting and top-notch, and rather than simply build the subtitles directly into the video, he uses YouTube subtitles. That means that I can use the "Zhongwen Popup Chinese Dictionary" browser extension to hover my mouse over the subtitle text and get a quick translation of any words I don't know. Most other Chinese channels that I've seen don't really have that feature. That also means that when I want to practice without the subtitles, I can turn them off. It's p
    5 points
  3. I reckon the best teachers speak as quickly as they can get away with - so, fast enough to put the student slightly out of their comfort zone. But the teacher will always circle back to ensure comprehension of they key teaching points they're trying to make. That way the student learns from exposure to language at just the right level of difficulty (the brain gets and benefits from a real workout), and also learns the teaching points prepared for that day.
    5 points
  4. I'm not sure if this topic has come up before, but there seemed to be some interest recently when I described my own online lessons, so here goes... Teacher Shuo of the ShuoshuoChinese说说中文 youtube channel has been live streaming lessons with her students. Obviously this is a promotional exercise because she teaches online, but it's also interesting to sit in and watch/listen to compare with your own experience, especially if — like me — you've only ever studied Chinese online and 1:1. Here's today's live stream which I hope will also be available after it has finished:
    4 points
  5. Unless you are totally stuck on Anki, I recommend TofuLearn, which has decks for all the HSK standard level lists. Really convenient to learn and review on one's phone. Those do include the part of speech, along with sample sentences.
    3 points
  6. @Catcot this might interest you. I only recently found out that there is an UK Chinese Brush Society, you may find much useful information, lovely paintings, and also contact some of the members through their web site: Chinese Brush Painters Society (cbps.org.uk)
    3 points
  7. Finished 《雾》, the first book in 巴金’s love trilogy. It is an OK story. I liked the prose but not the indecisive male protagonist. The novel was easy to understand, except for a paragraph on the final page that might be in 文言. Up next is the second book in the trilogy, 《雨》.
    3 points
  8. I started this thread a long time ago but now that I've got some time to spend studying Chinese again, I've started flashcarding again too. But unlike previous decks, for this one, each item generates three cards - I now go three ways - testing me on: 1. Chinese characters -> Pinyin + English 2. Pinyin -> English 3. English -> Pinyin (All three parts are shown in each answer). I added numbers 2 and 3 because I worry that if I just test myself on Chinese characters, I'm often not remembering a two-character word, but am instead deciphering
    3 points
  9. And good old Zeus: he ate his first wife Metis, he kidnaped Europa, and he used his shape shifting skills to seduce Leda. Seems, it was common courtesy in these times and spheres. As @Lu explained, these stories may have emerged independently. Maybe most mythologies have such stories.
    3 points
  10. If it helps, Scotland has water-horses which shape-shift, eat human meat (except the liver, they don't like liver) and kidnap poor Scottish lassies.
    3 points
  11. Hello and welcome to the forums! Regarding your first point, being familiar with both characters’ backstories, I don’t see too much similarities between Zhu Bajie and Shuten Doji, and I’m fairly confident that they are not related. There are plenty of demons that exist in both the Chinese and Japanese folklore, which was a result of the extensive relations between China and Japan in the pre-Heian era - this is how Buddhism was introduced to Japan. The attributes you mentioned about Zhu Bajie and Shuten Doji are not unique to them (a lot of demons are supposed to be shapeshifter and
    3 points
  12. Because releasing this information as a watermarked unsearchable PDF can only be interpreted as a direct challenge to our technical prowess, and some of us have work that we are looking for an excuse to procrastinate on.
    3 points
  13. For the past year or so I've been trawling through YouTube for Chinese content to practice my listening comprehension, going from TV shows to Chinese street interviews to vlogs to Chinese lectures. For the most part though, the content has been quite unengaging and so it's hard for me to keep watching. That being said, I'm sure the world of Chinese YouTube content is vast, I just have no idea how to seek out the gems hiding within. So what do you watch or listen to in order to practice Chinese listening comprehension? Doesn't have to be YouTube of course, it could be anything as
    2 points
  14. @王老师 and I just did the practice OPI assessment, and after hearing my provisional grade from her I plan on registering for the actual test.
    2 points
  15. Is anyone else planning to take the level 7-9 test as soon as it becomes available (or shortly thereafter)? I passed HSK 5 back in 2019, and have tried a few of the mock exams for HSK 6 and found them to be fairly passable (like I predict I could score around 220... so nothing too great, but still technically passing). I feel like level 6 is the right test for me, but since the announcement of the new system, I have lost all interest in taking the current HSK 6 test. And since the new HSK 6 won't be around til 2023/2024 (apparently), I am considering attempting to jump ahead and take a stab a
    2 points
  16. I've had a few replies from the UK Confucius Institutes I emailed, and to summarise: Yes, Hanban is gone and CIEF/CLEC is now managing the centres CLEC will be "less involved [than Hanban was] with individual CI affairs, with many of the strategic and operational decisions left to the institutional level between the host and Chinese partner institutions." None of the UK CIs are expecting to close (unlike the situation in the US for example) Perhaps most significantly: None of the 5 who replied currently know anything about the format or organisation of the new
    2 points
  17. I must confess that Li Yongle probably isn't for everyone. He does talk rather quickly, and his preferred subject matter is skewed towards STEM stuff. I myself come from a STEM background, so maybe I'm just conditioned for it. I can't casually or passively enjoy it (because my listening comprehension is sketchy at best), but I have to go through a disciplined regimen of listening to each 5-minute segment repeatedly and over the course of days, both with and without the help of captions.
    2 points
  18. By far the best will be the ones you create yourself, where you pick example sentences yourself. I do think it makes a really big difference, so the substantial extra effort compared to pre-made decks is worth it in my opinion.
    2 points
  19. Happy to do longer interviews, but it's really up to the host more than me. Lots of very interesting stuff on memory there but also a lot of other stuff too - you have to sift through it for the gems.
    2 points
  20. Yes, we see most of our interest for Shanghainese come from people who either have a family connection (parent, partner who speaks Shanghainese) or live in Shanghai and want to have a closer connection to the place. For Hokkien, there are so many versions of it, but what we mainly taught so far is 台语 though thats probably due to our school in Taipei. We were just in the process of opening our school in Singapore when Covid hit. In Flexi Classes we are having different city versions, so for Mandarin this started we Shanghai and we are starting to introduce Taipei (which include
    2 points
  21. I don't watch online videos for that purpose. I watch them to learn more about a specific subject. One of my hobbies is cooking Chinese food, so I often watch videos that show an interesting approach to making this or that dish. I use Baidu and YouTube. One thing I've learned is that searching English titles in YouTube yields very different results from searching the topics in Chinese. If I search 鱼香肉丝 I am more apt to get authentic results, mostly videos made by Chinese cooks, aimed at Chinese viewers. Instead, if I search using the English name of the dish, such as "Sichuan fish
    2 points
  22. Hi, I don't think I've posted here before! I've realised I probably won't be able to go to China until 2022 (university year abroad) so I'm working on improving my reading speed and comprehension as much as I can before then. So far this calendar year I've read 活着 (which went totally over my head), Sanmao's 撒哈拉的故事 (enjoyed and found at the right level) and Chinese translations of the first two Harry Potter books - I'm nearly done with the third in the series, which I think I'll probably take a break from as it's getting pretty monotonous. I'm planning to try to read a Chinese transla
    2 points
  23. If your teacher speaks slower than this, she is babying you. I think this lady has probably slowed her normal speech down for the sake of the lesson. If she were talking to one of her local native Chinese contemporary pals, it would be faster and less distinct, with some words more likely to be slurred. Of course, I might be mistaken. My experience has been that native Chinese speakers, like native speakers of any language, seem to have an individual preference for speaking speed. Some just go fast and some just go slow. I currently live in the American Southwest, whe
    2 points
  24. Happy April! And to celebrate, here is a nice little bit of verse, courtesy of Ximalaya: 《秋风词》a Tang Dynasty ci ( 词 ) by Li Bai (李白) https://www.ximalaya.com/renwenjp/25192409/323987099 This is a 'ci' 词, not a 诗,词 are much less formal, they were sung and composed to fit into popular tunes. They became much more common in later dynasties. I like this little ci because it's very simple and straightforward, uses common words, and tells a story we may all be familiar with. It's also very easy to memorise. The reader in this Ximalaya version is a dubbing actor for Chinese TV
    2 points
  25. Or in other words, all supposedly “higher-level” thinking such as “problem-solving skills” or “critical thinking”, are ultimately based in knowledge and knowledge recall. This is why it is wrong to deny school aged children access to knowledge-rich curriculums and fob them off with alternatives like “project-based” or “discovery-based” learning. For more information on this web-of-knowledge idea you can read about schema. Your mind works by creating links between pieces of information. That’s why people who know more stuff are more creative - they are able to make new and excitin
    2 points
  26. Sure, let me give a very simple example off the top of my head. Suppose you are trying to recall how to write the character pronounced "chéng" that means honest. You try to recall it directly but just thinking of the definition and sound is ringing no bells in your mind. But, since you learn Chinese as a web of knowledge, not a list of individual data points, you remember that this character shares a component with the very common character of the same pronunciation, chéng, such as in the word "chéngwéi". When you hear "chéngwéi" in your head, it triggers the characte
    2 points
  27. This is quite interesting. The Hokkien should have some variation in Singapore, Penang, other parts of Malaysia and Taiwan. Penangites can be a somewhat standoffish about their version of hokkien.
    2 points
  28. 2 points
  29. There's probably a sizeable bunch of people in Singapore who would be interested in Hokkien as a heritage language.
    2 points
  30. These similarities could also be explained as coincidence. The kidnapping of women happened in both societies and was considered a very bad thing. Eating meat is also a big taboo in both societies, though it probably occasionally happened in times of famine. It's not strange that a demon would do things that are highly taboo. As to the shape-shifting, that is not unique to Zhu Bajie (Sun Wukong is a good shapeshifter himself!), so also not a unique trait. Of course it's possible that the two are related, or that one is inspired by the other, but they could also easily have emerged
    2 points
  31. I'm sorry if this has already been said somewhere, but does anyone have any idea about how the translating part works? I mean, is it only English -> Chinese and vice-versa? There's a ton of people from minor countries learning Chinese, and many don't speak a widely-spoken language. Is the ccp making us learn English first now? 😬
    2 points
  32. It's making me seriously considering aiming for HSK 5 in December 2021, in case that's the last opportunity. This is probably 2-3 months earlier than I had been anticipating, but then again sometimes it's good to have a concrete target to aim for.
    2 points
  33. A lot of the uses for this data - for example, dictionaries and flashcard lists and language courses - take a while to prepare. (In my case i wanted it ASAP to start the process of making sure we have a dictionary entry for every word in the list)
    2 points
  34. I think it's a combination of the government clamping down on illegal working lately, and then more recently all the teachers who fled China when COVID started who haven't been able to come back. At the end of 2019 I remember seeing the average salaries of posted jobs around me were like 13 or 14k, maybe a little higher. By the middle of last year it was closer to 20, and the last couple of months I've been seeing more and more 30's. People need their English fix it seems.
    2 points
  35. I'd be very keen for this - I always feel like I come out of these talks with lots of inspiration and questions, but noone to talk about it with!
    1 point
  36. That was interesting! Nice to 'see' you there Luxi, had it been a real-life event I'd invite you to have a drink afterwards and talk Chinese literature some more. On the other hand, had it been a real-life event probably neither of us would have been there. I like how they set up these events, bit of information from every side, a good introduction of the author and this specific book. I had trouble understanding 贾老师 (fortunately I know he is famous for that...), unfortunately I didn't quite get what exactly he said about his view on traditional vs modern women. That was a good que
    1 point
  37. I was recently in touch with a Dutch CI, which I was worried was closing, but they assured me that they are not, that their partnership with the university will continue as planned and that the project I was going to do for them will take place. I am not 100% reassured, but it looks like the Hanban changes at least don't affect this CI.
    1 point
  38. Last year I tried watching a video of this guy, but I was bothered by many errors in what he was teaching. Maybe I got unlucky and should try another video. Yeah I watched over 50 episodes of that already, it's amazing. 刘星 is so entertaining, and his dynamic with 小雪 is really funny at times. But time to inject some variety into my Chinese language input. Interesting, I've never been one for crime stuff but I'll give them a try. That last one you mentioned is very unique, it makes me wonder how real it actually is (versus being somew
    1 point
  39. After someone else introduced it here a while ago, I've really started to enjoy 小叔TV's exploration of Chinese cities and life. His Chinese -- accent and usages -- hits my sweet spot: just like being back in Beijing. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPNfoYdMopKZKlaTB92g-QQ/videos
    1 point
  40. Thanks Luxi. I’ll have a look, I am so thankful for having internet, I can explore cultures, appreciate arts and visit countries right from the comfort of my house.
    1 point
  41. Thanks for sharing. To me her audio is clear and her speed is fine. The student is adorable. I am glad he would let us see this. As to the lesson, it looks like a standard-ish lesson, neither particularly outstanding nor particularly bad.
    1 point
  42. Well if they fix those errors we know they're reading this thread.
    1 point
  43. I know. You and 大块头 have products on the market and for those, of course, speed and accuracy matter. 👍😊 Does the new HSK affect anyone on this forum on his personal journey of learning Chinese? Many of the comments below this video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2JVBZLoMYt0) are quite negative and you read a lot of frustration. I am not sure why. The language has not changed after all and, surely, you will not need to pass (new) HSK 9 to be admitted to a Chinese uni.
    1 point
  44. I would at least look at the possibility of direct application. Just looking quickly at that page: "This website does not disclose the name and city of the school due to work requirements" - ie, you have little choice in where we send you. I'm not keen on the way agencies are inserting themselves in between students and universities, and would much rather see direct applications. I've written about this before. However, I also know the application processes can be confusing, and in some cases universities and scholarship providers may prefer to work with agencies as a) less w
    1 point
  45. HKS 3000 characters.docx In case someone needs it: attached is the list of 3000 characters I extracted from the pdf file using Google docs OCR. I skimmed over the docx file and still saw OCR errors in some places (in yellow). Does anyone have better output? Thanks.
    1 point
  46. We ARE the greybeards.
    1 point
  47. I too found the Japanese novels I read so far surprisingly easy. I think the Chinese translators don't add literary 'flourishes' in their translations from the Japanese. If I remember correctly all the texts were very straightforward, even though one of the novels was set in the Tang.
    1 point
  48. Somewhat related to what you guys are talking about, but also just to recommend - Just a few days ago I’ve started a book called 红手指 by 东野圭吾. A Japanese thriller story in Chinese translation. I’m only about 40 pages in, but so far I’m liking it. It’s going surprisingly well in terms of the difficulty, and though the story progresses rather slowly, I find it very nice. I’ve only finished three books in Chinese before this one - 活着,第七天,and an excessively difficult translation of “The Old Man and the Sea” (terrible choice on my part). After a very long time without reading anything serious i
    1 point
  49. Nice, I found this similar: https://www.waddingtons.ca/media2/1060/waddingtons-72de5c336f3e0ef7e2a4a0075797e00f.jpg the writings are from here: https://gotheborg.com/glossary/wushuangpu.shtml always nice to learn something new! cheer for that!
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...