Jump to content
Chinese-forums.com
Learn Chinese in China

Featured

  1. abcdefg

    abcdefg

    Members


    • Points

      14

    • Content Count

      6,947


  2. NinKenDo

    NinKenDo

    Members


    • Points

      10

    • Content Count

      135


  3. Lu

    Lu

    Members


    • Points

      5

    • Content Count

      8,325


  4. Jim

    Jim

    Members


    • Points

      5

    • Content Count

      1,113


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/20/2021 in Posts

  1. I unwittingly hijacked a thread about how to find a replacement battery for a phone while in China. https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/61375-buying-samsung-note9-battery/?tab=comments#comment-480833 Wasn't my intent, but by telling several anecdotes over the course of several days, I kind of veered away from the main topic. I apologize for that. Will try to repair the damage by moving the anecdotes to a new thread, here. The thing they have in common was that each of these practical tasks helped me master some bits of the language. If you are someone who like
    5 points
  2. I have occasionally felt this frustration, but most of it comes from other people, directed at me. Especially when engaging in small talk, when somebody realizes I'm interested in Chinese. "Why would you ever want to learn Chinese?" "How do you plan to use it?" "Why haven't you already learned how to speak it?" "Why is it taking so long?" "Without immersing yourself in China, how do you ever hope to succeed?" My country (the USA) is infamous for its resistance to learning languages--most of us only know English. Most people around the world have to learn 2 or even 3 languages. So most people I
    3 points
  3. I got my copy signed by Chen Zhongshi himself when he came to Beijing to do a talk years back! Carpenter Wei is a character, he's mentioned in this review: https://www.douban.com/group/topic/32002769/ Lu is right about the 摊派, as well as sharing round a work quota like this it's also used for having a whip-round when e.g. you decide to do up the shrine to the God of the Soil.
    3 points
  4. Timeline of the dynasties: https://lensdump.com/i/ZzoQE0 These dynasty names are often used in literature, people's names/titles, stories, etc. -- anytime you feel lost for not having a time reference for these dynasties, just swipe open your desktop!
    3 points
  5. These sites have a lot of Cantonese dubs but you can find Mandarin dubs as well. Just look for 国语/國語 (guoyu) and you can find a treasure trove of classic anime in Mandarin. https://www.yueyuds.com/dongman https://www.ktkkt.top/ Here are also sites that have local chinese anime. Just look for 动画 (donghua) Not exactly sure if that is what you asked for but if the cdramas were a too dry for you then you should give these a try. https://v.qq.com/ https://www.bilibili.com/ https://www.iqiyi.com/ https://youku.com/
    3 points
  6. I've been studying for 10+ years and I occasionally bump up against this... I simply have no practical use for my Chinese abilities. It sure is a fun and rewarding hobby most of the time but I don't use it for work, I don't have any Chinese friends or family in my immediate vicinity, and there are no other interactions in my daily life which would require me to use it much at all. I like Chinese movies and novels but again there are few I know who share those interests. I guess it is strange to think this way because there are plenty of people who speak Chinese far better than I d
    2 points
  7. Before the pandemic I taught a weekly basic English class at my local senior center for Chinese-speakers, which was pretty rewarding.
    2 points
  8. I really like the ranbow bridge stories. I am currently at the lowest level. I bought the rainbow bridge starter bundle for Pleco, but I think there is no difference to the paper versions. What is in it: One story per book. All stories are written in (simplified) hanzi with no pinyin. Every story comes with a translation, some exercises and the solutions to the exercises. The stories I have read so far are old chinese myths and fairy tales. What I like: They are "real" stories. No stiffly choreographed dialogs of real life situations. No toddlers books. But stories with a st
    2 points
  9. This could be a factor. I am probably just missing out on that community that I had before the pandemic. A lot of it went online and I just couldn't get into it anymore. But now that things are coming back I'll keep my eyes peeled.
    2 points
  10. If that's how you feel, then maybe that's something worth pursuing? Why not do something with it after all? Join a local meet-up or something, you can use it to socialise or enjoy cultural events. I dunno your particular situation but one thing I've done this semester at University is seek out Mandarin language clubs. If it bothers you that you're not using it more, then find excuses to use it more. Socialising isn't a time-waste despite how we often feel about "being productive" these days.
    2 points
  11. A lot of people use Hello Talk app. If all fails and you don't mind spending a bit of money you might want to consider Italki and find some community teachers who would normally charge a lot cheaper than professional teachers (some charge as little as 10 USD per hour) and you can just book "conversation lessons" with them on top of other more structured class.
    2 points
  12. Do people in China and Hong Kong really mind giving directions in the age of smartphones? When I see people in my city looking at a map or standing at a corner peering at their phone, I actively seek them out to ask if they need directions. I never hesitate to ask random people on the street for directions (and they always help me), and wouldn't in China either. It usually takes less than half a minute, they get to feel good about their knowledge and helping someone and I get closer to where I'm going. I used to always ask bus drivers to 报站 and they always did. Now I wonder if they
    2 points
  13. I love that effect, happened with a Chinese drama for me. I would get 20 minutes in to an episode and suddenly my brain would whisper "oh hey, just FYI this is in Chinese, I noticed you forgot" and it was the strangest sensation for my brain to suddenly become cognisant that it was hearing Chinese and not English.
    2 points
  14. One that surprised me was going to see movies in Kunming (in the theater) and later not remembering if the dialogue had been in Chinese or English. I remembered the content of the film, remembered the characters and the action, but just hadn't thought about the language enough to know what version I had seen. (Sometimes these were American films released on the Mainland in Chinese editions 中文版。) I also remember being caught up short a couple times when part of a film moved to Thailand. Whoa! What are they saying? It was startling to suddenly not be able to understand. Had to start
    2 points
  15. The teacher was someone I hired for one-to-one instruction. The rest is collapsed and moved. See here for more: https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/61400-using-daily-tasks-to-learn-chinese/
    2 points
  16. Thanks very much, Lu. Yes, mural makes more sense. This trip to China was the first time I realized I like taking photos. I am putting these old photos together as a book, but it will be a draft as there is so much one could add, so I may do more work on it later. The more I look through the photos, the more I like this picture, actually. It's rather powerful. It isn't one of those standardized groups of worker, peasant and soldier, all grinning into the sunrise - which I also like but one can have enough of them. As to where it was, it seems to have been at the Chiliying commune nea
    2 points
  17. 坚持数年 jiānchí shùnián 必有好处 bì yǒu hǎochù 认真学习马列主义的书 rènzhēn xuéxí Mǎ-Liè zhǔyì de shū The font is interesting, bit unusual, that makes it difficult to read.
    2 points
  18. Google Translate. Although from memory it only translates pinyin without tones (seriously wth Google).
    2 points
  19. For what it's worth, I have twice had dealer service done in Kunming on my Xiaomi phone. Took it to the service center as described above, Both times it was "while you wait." Service was fast, effective, and inexpensive. As you might guess, going off peak is a good idea. Getting practical things like this done is also a great way to expand your language abilities. I used to always rehearse beforehand and review after. ------------------------------- The rest has been collapsed and moved. See here for more: https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/61400-using-daily-
    2 points
  20. Oh wow!! I must have already had Firefox, it works fine on there!! I'll look for the report thing, Thanks Duck!
    1 point
  21. Works fine for me on both Android Chrome (touchscreen input) and Windows Chrome (mouse input). Works pretty slowly and jankily on Windows Firefox, but doesn't have the bug you describe. Maybe submit a bug report to Google?
    1 point
  22. Actually there is a carpenter whose surname is 卫 in the first chapter. I don't know whether the whole 卫 family are carpenters, but I am sure that 卫老三 is a carpenter. He forces his third daughter to marry 白嘉轩.
    1 point
  23. I have to say I have felt the same way - despite the fact that my professional life requires daily use of Chinese, I still really miss being in the hustle bustle of China, surrounded by potential conversations with all sorts of people from all walks of life. I particularly miss hearing local dialect, which I find so much more rewarding than the rather stark requirements of professional putonghua. I've actually started considering signing up for some speaking courses online until we can go back to China, just to open a dialogue back up.
    1 point
  24. Agree with @antony -- Cut my teeth on Chinese Breeze and Mandarin Companion. Why go with some sort of odd-ball, off-brand nonsense? Stick with the winners. I guess my advice would be different if someone is offering to give you those (the ones to which you linked.) "Make the procurement process easy" is advice number two. Don't want to get delayed, diverted and derailed by a "resource hunt." If you have something handy, use it. Start now. Don't let finding the ideal materials be an excuse to procrastinate.
    1 point
  25. I have gone through all Boya books up until the 1st advanced one and can provide some clarity. Only the beginner Boya series (初级 I and II - green colored books) come with a workbook. In the quasi-intermediate series (准中级 I and II - blue coloured books) the workbook has been integrated into the textbook. From intermediate (purple coloured books) onwards there are no more workbook style chapters and how the series is built up changes significantly. I still find the Boya series one of the most in-depth series which does not stop at 5000 words and consideres HSK 6 / 5000 words just abo
    1 point
  26. Doing a search of the forums turns up a couple dead resources. I was wondering if anybody knows a great source for Anime dubbed in Mandarin? I've generally resisted going down this route as I'm also learning Japanese which I've neglected a lot, and it seems foolish to spend my time watching Japanese content in Mandarin. But that said I really need something that I can watch over and over again, and C-Dramas just don't really offer that possibility to me. While I like the good ones well enough, having tried to rewatch them I'm usually just not nearly as engaged the next time around. Whereas wit
    1 point
  27. I feel your pain caused by the gap between graded readers and real novels. I experienced the same problem. To remedy it, I turned to children's books, in particular the kind that includes pinyin--not necessarily because I needed the pinyin, but because I think the presence of pinyin is an indication of reading/vocabulary level for children. I remember I read a book about Chinese myths, and so many words that I learned from that book have recurred in other written works. It was extremely helpful. I wish I could tell you the exact name and publisher, but it's sitting in a box somewhe
    1 point
  28. Currently there is no chinese restourant in my city, i have two friends from interpals, but they did not have time for a video call. Do you have any websites that could be helpful in this area?
    1 point
  29. This works, but you need people who don't mind their time being wasted helping you. Usually in China you'll be fine (especially if you are visibly a foreigner), because Chinese people are generally pretty nice, but sometimes it could be considered rude or impolite. I did a similar thing the first time I came to HK and couldn't speak Cantonese. The first things I taught myself to say were things related to asking for directions, asking for help, and ordering food. Everytime I got on a bus, I always asked the driver if this bus went to [destination], and I found stopping confusing, s
    1 point
  30. It says 鑒定 ("appraised") in an slightly more archaic form of the first character with the 金 radical, then there's a smaller 京 below, presumably the office where it happened bu can't read the rest. Star makes you think China but maybe that's a Japanese variant as second part of jian is simplified, will go and check. Then the place might be 京都 Kyoto. https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/鑑#Japanese
    1 point
  31. A 5-years later bump... the series is still on youtube (as a playlist at least). Also, there's a slightly easier way to DL youtube content these days... just go to the URL bar in the browser where it says (for example): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PC3DmhI-3tU ...and type "pp" immediately after "youtube" but before the "." and then hit return. This tool also has an option to DL MP3 audio only.
    1 point
  32. I've been waiting for the past two years to go and see a Broadway performance in Shanghai after seeing Matilda but COVID has rendered that impossible. I decided to try out a Chinese production of Tennessee William's "A Streetcar Named Desire" at 上海话剧艺术中心 yesterday. First of all, the whole production was amazing. The performances for Stanley and Blanche were something else entirely and I've already purchased tickets to the Chinese production of Arthur Miller's "Death of a Salesman." On the language side of things, though, I was stoked to walk out of the theater having understood nea
    1 point
  33. Apologies, guys. Let me see if I can move those long posts to another thread where they won't interfere with the main flow of this one. Good! It's typically rainy this time of year, but, as you found, the rain is accompanied by cooler temps. Not sure if you will have time or interest, but it is now prime wild mushroom season in Yunnan. If that is something you think you might enjoy, I would encourage you to seek out one of the many wild mushroom hotpot restaurants and give it a try.
    1 point
  34. If you're going to hijack a thread, then do it completely, with class, and must-read anecdotes... 😊 Thank you @abcdefg! And btw I'm currently in Kunming! I hope you can get back here sooner or later... from what I've seen so far it's a great place. If only for the climate... I escaped two solid weeks of 38 degs C / 100F in Hangzhou for 24 degs C / 75F in July, and that has been very welcome indeed.
    1 point
  35. One thing to add to the above is find some language partners. Chinese live in so many countries, there is a good chance you can find someone. You help them with English, they help you with Chinese. This said, initially this will be difficult because it took me a very long time to develop reasonable conversation skills. However, short calls to practice language could help keep you motivated. My Chinese friends are a chief source of motivation for me. Also, most Chinese want to help foreigners learn their language (however, as in any country, only some know how to do this well
    1 point
  36. This is certainly good calligraphy. The style is idiosyncratic, but it has clearly been made by someone who knew what they were doing.
    1 point
  37. It's a village propaganda mural rather than a poster by the looks of it, you tend to get the style of the best calligrapher handy.
    1 point
  38. Hey @Zeppa curious where this was, like Lu said, it's a very idiosyncratic typography.
    1 point
  39. As Chinese is not a phonetic language, it is difficult to pick up the pronunciation of new words while extensively reading. So, I’m at a bit of a loss whether or not to look up the pronunciation of new words while extensively reading. On the one hand, not looking them up allows for a smoother reading experience and the majority of the new words looked up and will be uncommon and quickly forgotten. However, not looking up the words at all would lead to a high reading fluency that does not translate to speaking as you do not know the pronunciation of origin or the definitions for. Wh
    1 point
  40. I think if you wanted to use an element from your family name 中村 Nakamura, you could contract it to 中 Zhōng or 邨 Cūn (from 村), which are both Chinese family names. From there, you could use the given name 岩 Yán to become 中岩 Zhōng Yán. Another option might be to add another character to the given name to make it more unique, e.g. 中珩岩 Zhōng Hángyán, 中皓岩 Zhōng Hàoyán, etc. Alternatively, you could use a rock/stone-related family name such as 石 Shí or 岳 Yuè and choose a different given name. E.g. 石灏 Shí Hào, 石立灏 Shí Lìhào, 石磊 Shí Lěi, 石桥 Shí Qiáo, 石骧 Shí Xiāng, 岳鹏 Yuè Péng, 岳锦 Yuè Jǐn, etc.
    1 point
  41. Is there even such a thing as an official "payslip" in China? The best I've ever received as an employee (not freelance) was a screen-grab of a line in a spreadsheet. On the other hand, obtaining a tax record (to prove you've paid for a given period) is quite simple if you go to the local tax office. There's even an app 个人所得税 that you can use to do it, and to do a tax return.
    1 point
  42. Self-employed in the UK here, and the bank's never asked for anything but tax records (SA302s) and bank statements. I don't have payslips to show them, and while I've sent out many invoices, I've never got one back stamped 'paid' or anything.
    1 point
  43. You may want to call your carrier and check if their international roaming works in China. However, things are super fluid in China, and what worked today, many not work tomorrow. FYI, the last time I went to China in 2019, getting a legit sim card in China was fairly difficult, unless you are in an airport or university. I ended up getting one from a shady store in a subway pedestrian tunnel for an inflated price (about double the legit price)
    1 point
  44. Good question. A colleague of mine from Canada had some type of global roaming that worked in China (3 years ago). He could literally upload pictures he took standing on the Great Wall to his Facebook. I think he said it was a special Apple deal that allows for global roaming (but do not quote me on that). Since I am an Android user did not follow up on this.
    1 point
  45. All of them? (and I'm sure more have popped up since that post was written). Without knowing what specifically you have read, or what your level is, it's difficult to recommend something. As markhavemann mentioned, 活着 is often recommended as a first novel (forums post here), as is 许三观卖血记 by the same author. Recently, a number of people have also been reading and recommending the novel 《草鞋湾》. If those are still out of reach in terms of difficulty, it's probably worth using a service such as The Chairman's Bao, which provides graded newspaper articles at a range of diff
    1 point
  46. Good day everyone! I would like to ask everyone here regarding my case. I was hired to teach in Shanghai. I was able to process all the documents needed by the employer for my work permit notice. At first. I was told to conduct medical tests here in my home country and I was marked fit to work by the medical doctor eventhough I am reactive with Hepatitis B. Just last week , I was informed by my employer that no need for my medical tests here since I will be having the medical tests when I arrive in Shanghai. Now my question is, will I be sent back home if the test for Hepati
    1 point
  47. @brightfuture Please tell your experience have you got visa? I am facing the same condition please do share how you gone through?
    1 point
  48. When he was a kid, the great basketball player Magic Johnson used to wake up before dawn in the cold Michigan mornings to go out to the basketball courts to shovel snow. After shoveling, he’d play both before school and after. Charles Barkley, similarly, used to spend an hour a day jumping over a four-foot high fence. Over and back, over and back, until his legs were tremendously strong and he could out rebound anyone. Both of these guys later went on to become NBA legends. Of course, they both had natural talent and were born a bit on the tall side, to say the least. But more than that,
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...