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Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/08/2020 in Posts

  1. 7 points
    Frankly, I've been waiting for a revision of the test since Hanban introduced the actual format in 2010. The HSK test, even at the highest levels (HSK 5 and 6), is so simple that the equivalence HSK 6=C1 is impossibile to accept. The table for HSK 2020 seems to take into account that at the elementary level a learner need to know 2500 words, at the intermediate level 5000/6000 words, at the advanced level 10.000 words. Now I hope to see in the text more extracts from university textbooks for chinese students, modern literature, magazines, essays, real spoken chinese (media, interviews etc.), and maybe, at the advanced level, classical grammatical structures used today in formal Chinese. 🙂 🙂
  2. 5 points
    I just had an email from my employer suggesting that the process for our overseas staff to return to Hangzhou is about to start, and it looks like it will involve getting antibody and nucleic acid tests done before departure (good luck with that anyone in the UK — including me!) and then quarantining in a hotel for 14 days on arrival. Plus in my case applying for a Z-visa all over again, because mine expired in June before I even got to enter the country. Oh, the anticipation...
  3. 5 points
    Some online dictionaries offer this feature. MDBG online dictionary has a tiny button with a >> symbol between the character and its definition. Press it and it will lead you to several options to learn more about the character, including one to pull example sentences from jukuu. There's also Yellow Bridge, rarely if ever mentioned in these forums. The site has been going on for years but is still well maintained and its content seems to be updated and expanded quite regularly, enough to be worth a visit. There's a pay subscription version (gets rid of advertising and offers additional goodies), but the free version includes all the main content and basic functions. The Chinese/English dictionary : https://www.yellowbridge.com/chinese/dictionary.php gives a lot of information, including examples, thesaurus (a variable amount of information, but often something useful to know), etymology, lists of compounds (not comprehensive but reasonably detailed). The Subscription version also has Derived Words and Similar Sounding Words. And I only just noticed, the dictionary page has a very useful list of Words in The News on the right hand side, among the ads. There's always something new to find in Yellowbridge
  4. 5 points
    Has anybody here ever used the Common Voice dataset for their language studies? They released an update last week and the Mandarin Chinese parts of the dataset now have a total of about 140 hours of recorded sentences for China and Taiwan. From Wikipedia: I immediately thought of the MorphMan add-on for Anki when I read about this update (paging @NinKenDo), though not having English translations for these sentences is a limitation. About 15% of the sentences are tagged with the speaker's birthplace. Perhaps this dataset could be used to find good examples of regional accents? Some example sentences from the corpus are below. 宋朝末年年间定居粉岭围。 渐渐行动不便 二十一年去世。 他们自称恰哈拉。 局部干涩的例子包括有口干、眼睛干燥、及阴道干燥。 嘉靖三十八年,登进士第三甲第二名。 这一名称一直沿用至今。 为了惩罚西扎城和塞尔柱的结盟,盟军在抵达后将外城烧毁。 河内盛产黄色无鱼鳞的鳍射鱼。 他主要演出泰米尔语电影。 福崎町是位于日本兵库县中部的行政区划。 下行月台设有厕所。 耶尔河畔圣伊莱尔人口变化图示 光绪八年再中举人。 赫拉克勒斯是希腊神话中的半神英雄。 蔡声白。 该区舰队主要负责为公海舰队的战列分舰队提供屏护。 雷诺在回归的第一年比赛中以第四名的成绩完成了比赛。 这样都可以啊 此原理也广泛应用于家庭之中用于生产软水。 本片的导演是赵秀贤和梁铉锡。 奥特拉德诺耶农村居民点是俄罗斯联邦沃罗涅日州新乌斯曼区所属的一个农村居民点。 吉内斯塔。
  5. 4 points
    The suggestions of using the dictionary provided examples may be convenient but I think actually work against some of the benefits of @Jan Finster doing the leg work and finding the sentences through google: 1) Phrases in the wild will naturally be more authentic; 2) The process of searching will help her (him?) get used to scanning Chinese for what he is looking for. Incidentally, a skill that is also important for HSK 5 and 6. Additionally, Research from Laufer and others have shown that vocabulary acquisition can be strengthened when the learner needs to search for the vocab in some way; 3) Greater context provided from the webpage on which the phrase is found. Isolated dictionary sentences are still divorced from context and can make it difficult to determine the level of formality being used.
  6. 4 points
    Ha! This was really useful. I hadn't realised Word could do the conversion, but it's done a much better job than whatever was used to create the file I was given. Daft of me. Headache over, I think.
  7. 3 points
    If there's one thing I think I've learned over years of trying to learn and speak a few foreign languages, it's never get into a discussion like this with a native speaker. This isn't a matter of "qualifications." It's the way he speaks, and it sounds like he speaks just like quite a few other people in China. Would you always expect an English teacher from the U.K. to speak with BBC diction? I'd say you have your answer. Why raise it with him again? If you don't like his "accent," then just get another teacher. But don't try to show him you're right and he's wrong. Hopeless.
  8. 3 points
    Not sure if this is what you meant, but there is a way to access the Tofulearn dictionary outside of studying.
  9. 3 points
    This sounds like a great method, especially if your goal is to develop the ability to write in a specific style (e.g. scientific papers or technical documentation). If that isn't your goal then you will still benefit from reading all these usage examples you find in the wild. I don't know what your Chinese level is. If you aren't advanced then I'd suggest using the HSK word list or a word frequency listing to focus on the most common words first. Here's a graph I made with the SUBTLEX-CH word frequency listing. The first 5k most common words constitute >93% of the corpus. Don't go chasing after diminishing returns until you've picked all the low-hanging fruit. In addition to internet searches, you could also look through some of the corpora out there like the LCMC to find usage examples.
  10. 3 points
    For those that don't have Word, the free OpenOffice Writer can also do this.
  11. 3 points
    Not sure this will help you, but if at least one of your docs is a pdf (if not Word already), and you have Word/Office 2016 or 365, it's easy to convert the orientation to whatever you want, so at least you'll have both documents with the same orientation. Use 'Open with' to open your document with Word, save that copy as a docx file. Now you can edit it. Select 'Layout' from the ribbon menu and use the 'Text Direction' options on the left hand side. If working on paper and desperate, you can always OCR and convert.
  12. 2 points
    Really sorry to hear that @abcdefg... And moving out of your home is stressful enough when you're there on the ground, never mind doing it from the other side of the world. Stay safe in Texas. Here's to happier times when can roam free again.
  13. 2 points
    March = 三月 Sān yuè (third month) 3 months = 三个月 Sān gè yuè gè 个 is a general-purpose measure word. https://resources.allsetlearning.com/chinese/grammar/Measure_words_for_counting Measure words, also known as classifiers, are a fascinating sub-topic in themselves. There are hundreds of them. https://resources.allsetlearning.com/chinese/grammar/Measure_word
  14. 2 points
    I think you will find a lot more information in this thread about the HSK 3.0 than you will in that Reddit post
  15. 2 points
    Hello and welcome to the forum! You'll find many helpful and knowledgeable people here. I personally recommend reading Olle Linge's book if you want to learn about good strategies for learning Chinese.
  16. 2 points
    I just wanted to share something I have been doing for the last 2 weeks: I have recently begun focussing more on improving my active vocabulary. In the course of doing so, I somehow started googling, baiduing or zhihu-ing certain expressions to find example contexts. I feel reviewing those examples may be a good way to memorise the words or grammar patterns. It also provides the brain with examples on how to use it. Rather than hoping that you will read the same word in different contexts in books or the like, this approach of mine is proactively searching for those contexts. Here are some recent examples: I wanted to better understand how to use "所需的" (needed; required, necessary for). So googling this here are some results: I added google auto-translations, which sometimes do not make (perfect) sense ((partly also because I have literally pulled the expression out of the context of the whole sentence)). 所需的日常飲食 Required daily diet 参会者所需的基本信息 Basic information required for participants 使用前所需的准备工作 The preparations required before use 是人体所需的六大营养 Is the six nutrients needed by the body 人体所需的营养素 nutrients the human body needs 人体所需的 required by the human body 人体所需的物质 一 A substance needed by the body 日常所需的物品 Daily necessary items 生活所需的 Required for life 各取所需 What they need 你所需要的 what you need 什么是人们生存所必需的 What is it necessary for survival 有您所需的服务 There are services you need 网站建设所需的资料 Information required for website construction 所需的资料 Necessary information 机能所需的能源 The required energy to function 创业所需的社会资 Social capital needed for business 所需的技能 Skills required 办公所需的办公用品 office supplies required for the office 涂鸦所需的工具 Graffiti tools required 可视化所需要的一切 Everything needed for visualization 所需要的一切 Everything you need 人体所必需的氨基酸 Essential amino acids the human body 所需要的经验是多少 how much experience is required... Here is 主要靠 (mainly by...; mainly rely on...): 主要靠勤奋 Mainly by hard work 公司盈利主要靠政府补助 Corporate profits mainly by government subsidies 主要靠想象力 Mainly by imagination 学习主要靠自己 The main learning on their own 收入主要靠汽车 Income mainly by car 主要靠气质 Mainly by temperament 主要靠中等收入者来实现 Mainly by middle-income people to achieve 经济增长主要靠房地产 Economic growth depends mainly on real estate 主要靠想象力 Mainly by imagination 主要靠什么发现目标 Mainly rely on finding the target 主要靠政府 Mainly by government 原材料主要靠进口 Mainly rely on imports of raw materials 收入应主要靠工资 It should mainly rely on wage income 主要靠这三种技术 Mainly by three techniques 需求主要靠清洁能源满足 Mainly rely on clean energy to meet demand I know there are dictionaries or http://www.jukuu.com/ that provide example sentences, but they are often not relevant to me or too long or contain too many new words. My search is really focussed on getting a list of "sentence snippets" that I can then use as inspiration or as building blocks to make my own sentences. By reviewing 10-30 examples of how a word is used, I also hope it will remain in my memory better than if I simply memorised it with Anki. I wonder if any of you have used a similar method and/or if you can think of ways on how to improve my system. (Yes, it is time-consuming. But if you listen to some random 3 hour English podcasts in the background, it is doable... 😉 (sometimes I get carried away during my search and then add more and more new words)
  17. 2 points
    I had my test today. I found it challenging in places especially as in the past few weeks my active and passive exposure to Mandarin has dropped off considerably these last few weeks. My Mandarin is pretty basic as rated by myself. As explained later by @Lusimonia , the test probes your ability in using the language. It was a bit of a surprise to find out that I am intermediate ability and some vocabulary that I use touches on advanced level. However, I feel that I don't have the necessary range of vocabulary to be truly intermediate. After the test finished, we had a discussion on our experiences of language learning which was nice. The test was good for me for generating self motivation. It comes at an appropriate time as social restrictions are being increased quickly in HK.
  18. 2 points
    I got it. Your example shows a pair of homophones, which are called as 同音异义词 in formal Chinese. Some of examples from neologisms may help you understand: 1. 智障 VS. 制杖 They have the same pronunciation of zhi4zhang4. The former one refers to an idiot while the latter one literally means making a staff. Although the latter one may not be compatible with the context, in online communication it is used within the sentence "你制杖吗?", representing the speaker's questioning on the listener's IQ. 2. 悲剧 VS. 杯具 They have the same pronunciation of bei1ju4. The former one refers to a tragedy while the latter one refers to a cup. Since they are homophones, the referential meaning of the former is often given to the latter, so the latter has a bad symbolic meaning. Then, it becomes the reason why two parties in love will not send coffee cups to the other half. The above twos are heteromorphic homophones. There are also homomorphic homophones, such as 杜鹃 du4juan1 (azalea or cuckoo) and 白话 bai2hua4 (unfounded words or written modern Chinese).
  19. 2 points
    " . . . and a wonderful IBM golf ball, electronic keys, you could just tickle the keys and type a sentence. You could take off the ball and change the font or language so it was fun." The IBM Selectric was indeed a magical machine, both in terms of its mechanics and its feel; it really did practically do the typing for you. The later models with the auto-correct feature were particularly cool. IBM stopped making them in 1986, but you can still find them along with the golfballs on ebay.
  20. 2 points
    I'm just watching* a more recent talk by Mullaney on the typewriter book which promises to also connect to his next book on the Chinese computer (which may or may not be Your Computer is on Fire, MIT Press, 2021.) https://youtu.be/KSEoHLnIXYk He mentions IMEs and typing competitions in there, which made me think of @Tomsima's recent posts on Cangjie. *Actually I've had to take a break half-way through because he talks so quickly and I'm worn out!
  21. 2 points
    No, all we know right now is that it will be primarily based on the 2010 book《 汉语国际教育用音节汉字词汇等级划分》.
  22. 2 points
    Just finished - total time 13 mintues exactly. Help out if you can!
  23. 2 points
    I think its a great study method, would be great if you'd be willing to share the deck here at some point in the future? It takes a lot of time and work for sure, and a human-curated mass sentence deck is direly lacking on the anki shared decks from what I can see. On this point, I thought it might be worth clarifying, sentence mining could and should be done 'actively' in everything you do. You should be reading and looking for new words and good sentences wherever you go, seeing every conversation opportunity as an opportunity to pick up new sentences (obviously this works better if youre in China, but still doable via the internet when abroad). I suppose what I'm saying is, I would argue it is more 'proactive' to use and interact with the language yourself and then get your sentence from these experiences, rather than searching online, which seems to me the more 'passive' approach. Not a criticism, just thought it was worth noting
  24. 2 points
    The original was top to bottom, yes. I kept the original layout as part of the theoretical side of my paper. The translation was on Chinese aesthetics, and I argued that the author used the physical arrangement of his text as a conscious effort to convey and realise the 'aesthetic' that he was writing about. I discussed how we as C-E translators might suceed or fail to recreate the aesthetic in what I guess you might call an 'art(y) book' for the coffee table, and one important part of this is how to 'translate' the appearance of the text. As the vertical to horizontal is actual a big part of the conversion process, I chose to present the original in vertical to show the dissonance that is unavoidable sometimes in translating chinese to english. I'll stop there, could talk about 'chinese aesthetics' (sorry for such a broad term) for days
  25. 2 points
    I've also done this. Really does take less than ten minutes.
  26. 2 points
    I strongly recommend you to keep studying hsk 2 material until you've mastered it. The first levels contain the most frequent characters in the language, they're the most important ones, and learning other things to the detriment of the basics will make your learning experience much more difficult. Passing the test is an important achievement, it shows your progress, but there's still some points for you to improve.
  27. 2 points
    A blessing for both of us, I'm sure...
  28. 2 points
    斝 jia3 an earlier 商 name for a ritual wine vessel similar and perhaps later identical to 爵. Take a look at the earliest forms of the character compared to what a 斝 looks like in reality, quite uncanny: and here is the same for a 爵 to show where the differences lie:
  29. 1 point
    (I am just an intermediate learner myself, so take it with a grain of salt) As you probably know, there is such a thing as tone neutralisation: https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/58924-weird-tone-inconsistencies-with-some-two-character-words/ https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/11124-neutral-tone-on-last-syllable/ https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/45816-second-tone-at-the-end-of-a-phrase/ https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/55512-sample-pronunciation/ (see Publius post on differences between mainland and TW) Further, as you may know there may be words that can have different tones and then have different meanings (e.g. 东西 (1-1 vs 1-5)) However, to me your examples are unambiguous and I agree, I would also find it odd. Is your teacher qualified? Does he have a degree teaching Chinese to foreigners? If it is just a random teacher from Italki, maybe he just does not know better? Or he could have some regional accent (?) (For instance folks in Tianjin apparently use somewhat different tones: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tianjin_dialect) (?)
  30. 1 point
    I do not know where your teacher was raised up, but that isn't actually standard Mandarin pronunciation. While some of these words sound acceptable with the second syllable pronounced toneless, some sound definitely quite odd (外滩,故宫). It's quite normal that different parts of Northern China (including Beijing) have different accents for Mandarin pronunciation, for instance in Northeastern China many people spell 脂肪 zhi3 fang2 instead of zhi1fang2. I think subtle differences are acceptable to some degree, but natives should make some effort while teaching Chinese as a foreign language. Anyway I haven't heard your teacher talking, so I can only say what I mentioned above.
  31. 1 point
    我放弃了。Don't think I will ever be able to move back. And it will be a long time before I'm even allowed a quick visit. Still trying to figure out a way to get important things from my Kunming apartment boxed up and sent to me here in Texas.
  32. 1 point
    So, there's this reddit post from last month. Has anyone here seen it? OP seems to have scanned a part of that book that's supposed to serve as a basis of the new HSK, and there's a short discussion about the book and the vocabulary list.
  33. 1 point
    Glad to hear that. Thanks for keeping us posted. Hope it works out!
  34. 1 point
    We've used icdsoft.com for years for our Hong Kong file mirror server - haven't ever required any HK-specific identity verification as far as I know. (though of course that could always change in the present environment) No option for SSH access though, shared hosting with a control panel only. EDIT: checked their website and they actually do offer VPS'es in Hong Kong now.
  35. 1 point
    Here are some more examples: "一个 天生 的" ("a born...", "a natural"😞 他就是一个天生的技术人员 He is a born technician 他是一个天生的内向者 He is a born introvert 孩子的母親也是天生的外向者 The child's mother is also a born extrovert 內向者和外向者都是天生的 Introverts and extroverts are natural 他是天生的外向者还是内向者 He is a born extrovert or introvert 鸟儿是天生的音乐家 The birds are born musicians 孩子都是天生的演说家 Children are born orators 一个天生的歌手 A born singer 一个天生的全能艺人 A born entertainer 我不是一个天生的领袖 I am not a born leader 一个天生的运动员 A natural athlete
  36. 1 point
    写错了 (Part of a written exchange) -- 哦,你姓王,不是张。不好意思,我写错了。
  37. 1 point
    Aha, I found this interesting post. I would like to share my thoughts about it and also to propose a question for your English natives. These seemingly unfamiliar characters almost come from the ancient Chinese, as you may see their strokes are more than those of simplified Chinese characters. And also some posts have mentioned these characters appear in the materials somehow related to Chinese history and literarture, such as musuems or novels. However, in spite of their not often used, we natives may figure out their pronunciations or meanings according to their structure. For instance, in @roddy's link, the character 鸨 frequently appears in TV dramas and it refers to the female manager of a brothel. If you are familiar with another character 鸡, which in some dialects refers to a prostitute, you may find they both have a radical of 鸟. Therefore, when a Chinese native first encounter this character, s/he may figure out its meaning according to its radical. This supposition also applies to the pronunciation. Then, the above point leads to my question: How can an English user guess the pronunciation or meaning of a word s/he does not recognize. In my opinion, a word can be understood according to its affix, which is also its structure. For example, mono- means single while di-means double, and something like this. How about those words without obvious affixes? By the way, I am also interested in one novel named Finnegans Wake, written by James Joyce. In this book, the author created plenty of linguistic magics for translators, such as a created 100-lettered word describing the sound of thunder. If you read it, how can the reading experience be smoothy and fluent? I am just curious, lol.
  38. 1 point
    I think @mungouk‘s advice is good, finding a hosting provider with data centers in Singapore will be less trouble and speed should be serviceable. Assuming you succeed at getting a HK hosting service, you may end up losing it in a year if China decides that even HK websites need to register with a valid ID. That said, Godaddy has pretty bad customer service. I use them as well but I’m comfortable on the command line and can resolve my own issues. If you need more support you might want to consider another provider.
  39. 1 point
    Lest my previous post misleads anybody I can now confirm that that Sougou on iPhone/iPad does indeed permit Traditional Characters...the setting is buried under several layers but it is there.
  40. 1 point
    Do you read Mongolian? That is the only text I know of that is written top-down, left-right.
  41. 1 point
    I'm doing this as an individual paper/module, so there's no problem there. Also, I'm doing it entirely from distance - I could have done either F2F or distance as below; https://www.massey.ac.nz/massey/learning/programme-course/course.cfm?course_code=241305 The only issue is that you have to show evidence to be eligible to enrol in the first place as per below (being a non New Zealander isn't a problem but the costs for overseas students start to get prohibitive). This was relatively easy for me as I have a previous degree through Massey. https://www.massey.ac.nz/massey/admission/enrolment/entry-requirements/entry-requirements_home.cfm
  42. 1 point
    Well, I've really blown it now. I just enrolled on a 300-level paper at Massey University here in NZ, 'Translation From and Into Chinese'. Work (unrelated) has been really busy and I nearly missed the cut-off date for Semester 2 and a huge part of me was hoping I wouldn't be accepted onto this level paper as it's just over 20 years since I last did a paper. Anyway, I just got the e-mail saying my application has been accepted - bugger! Seriously, during lockdown I thoroughly enjoyed spending time getting back into the Chinese and enrolling on a paper is a way of making sure I keep it up. I'm not a quitter so I know it will serve a really important purpose. One final comment - there's some real superstars on this site who freely give advice etc - one of my go-to sites every morning before going to work. Well done all!
  43. 1 point
    皴 cun1, appears in the word 皴法, a technique in Chinese painting that uses strokes of differing thicknesses to add texture to irregular surfaces like tree branches. The character 皴 literally means ’chapped‘, but is effectively a special character for this specific term.
  44. 1 point
    I’ve done a fair amount of reading physical books top-down, right-left. You get used to it after a while the biggest thing that still gets me is going back to the top of the next line, which I find I’m far more likely to scan to the top of the wrong line, compared to reading left-right, top-down. Sideways English text is not uncommon.
  45. 1 point
  46. 1 point
  47. 1 point
  48. 1 point
    You absolutely can, just remember that new threads are free, and if you have a new question unrelated to a previous thread, you'll see a better response if you start a new thread. With that in mind, I've split this off from the "Introduce Yourself" topic, because it has nothing to do with introducing yourself @TaxiAsh, P.S. with regards to your question in the other thread about quoting, just highlight the text you'd like to quote and a button should popup saying "Quote selection". Click that, and the text will be inserted as a quote in the reply field.
  49. 1 point
    靸 sǎ - one meaning is a type of straw slipper, but what I liked was the dialect verbal sense: 方言,把布鞋后帮踩在脚后跟下. So that's a special verb for wearing your cloth shoes with the heels crushed down like slippers.
  50. 1 point
    鑾 luán, the imperial carriage. Used as a euphemism for the emperor/imperial things, particularly when out of the palace. Turns up pretty regularly in 回鑾 'return to the palace', then I saw it recently in '金鑾' (as in 金鑾殿, the throne room in the imperial palace) in a piece of calligraphy by 文徵明 (元旦朝賀詩)
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