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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/19/2020 in Posts

  1. 5 points
    I've been avoiding giving specifics because I don't really understand Japanese culture that much and I'm scared I'd give a bad example, but well, I'll try. So in Japanese culture there is a concept of omote (surface) and ura (behind). People will play a role on the surface that it what they want to project to the world, and also what the society expects them to project, while "ura" will be what they really feel, but may not be allowed/encouraged to show outwardly. So I just read an article about some Taiwanese lady living in Japan talking about how Japanese "aren't direct" and "aren't able to accept different opinions". When a Japanese coworker bought a new handbag, all the other Japanese coworkers complimented her on it, but this Taiwanese lady said the "colour was a bit off". This shocked pretty much everyone, because in the omote sense of the world it's socially expected to compliment the new bag no matter what you actually think, and not complimenting would be pretty rude. So this Taiwanese lady just made a big faux pas in Japanese culture, but she thought she was just being herself/being honest and didn't see why other people should be offended. You're probably thinking, if everyone compliments everything, then how do people know that their bag looks bad? Isn't there strict judgement of bag fashion in Japan? (This is a joke, but not totally untrue) How does it all work? Well, Japanese people are constantly playing a game of "hiding your own ura" versus "guessing other people's ura". When people compliment your bag, they can compliment it looking very genuine, or complimenting it looking like they are just complimenting for the sake of being polite. Actually, some people are good at masking their ura feelings when they compliment, and it's hard to know whether they mean it or not. Japanese people are skilled at telling these apart. If you don't learn to "hide your ura", you'll come off as rude, and if you don't learn to "guess other people's ura", you'll piss people off and make them go mad. There is a word in Japanese, kuuki wo yomu, that literally means "read the air". It roughly means to pay attention to your surroundings (to know whether it's a smart idea to do something). About the "strict judgement of bag fashion". Well, there is a thing in Japanese culture (that may be related to omote ura), where you have to suppress your individualism. Japanese culture is always about pleasing "everyone". But sometimes when you please "everyone", not everyone is pleased. "Everyone" is like a nonexistent mythical being dictated by the strictness/rigidness of Japanese culture. It's what everyone thinks everyone wants; and what everyone is dictated to want by the norms of society, but not necessarily really what everyone wants. So with bag fashion, and well many things in general, you want to do choose something that "everyone" gets. This comes off to foreigners as Japanese people seeming to be really shy sometimes. Basically, nobody wants to stand out. Chinese culture shares this part too, because it's also a collectivism culture or something. About "guessing other people's ura" and kuuki wo yomu. This is related to another concept, ki wo tsukau (caring?). In Japanese culture, there's a general big expectation to pay attention to peoples needs, and make them feel comfortable (how much you're expected to do it depends on various things, I'll get to in a minute). I tried googling this and barely found any results. I can't believe people don't blog in English about such an important concept. But I did find one blog, which had a few examples: It's because of ki wo tsukau that you get "omotenashi". That word they use to describe how the service in Japan is good. Now service is a sort of special situation, because the customer is king, and as a customer you actually get a relax and don't have to do a lot of mental work (but trust the people servicing you will be). I remember reading some foreign people say that being a convenience store worker in a Japan is a big eye opener, because you get exposed to the most rude people ever (certain kinds of customers) who will treat you like trash. Partly it's because they think it's okay because they're a customer, but it's magnified in the convenience store worker situation probably due to perceived lack of worth or low status of the worker. Also, if a foreign convenience store worker isn't providing the level of omotenashi that people expect, people get more pissed. (But this is getting less of an issue in recent years, partly because in a lot of places people have gotten used to seeing foreign workers, and have gotten used to the poorer level of service; I mean who cares so much in a convenience store). There are also joge kankei (hierarchical relationships) and uchi-soto kankei (inner/outer relationships). Joge kankei is what it sounds like, often its based on age, status etc. uchi-soto kankei is whether or not people are your "in" group. Uchi (in group) is like family, close friends, your own company, your own club, your own whatever group. Soto (out group) are like strangers, people you are not as close to, people from other companies, etcetc. Both joge kankei and uchi-soto kankei sort of mix together in various ways to define formality/politeness and how you're supposed to act in front of people. This is also reflected in the language (there is formality and politeness directly encoded in the Japanese language). Basically, you need to be more formal/polite to higher hierarchy people, and to soto people, but to lower hierarchy or uchi people you don't have to be as much. I think in Japanese culture, uchi-soto trumps joge kankei to some degree, but I heard in Korean culture, hierarchical relationships rule (I dunno if it's true). While you have to ki wo tsukau in general in Japanese culture, you have to do it /more/ towards higher hierarchy relationships, and more towards soto relationships. Especially soto relationships. So when you meet people you don't know well, you put on your omote mask very tightly, and try really hard to make them feel their needs attended to. While with your uchi relationships, you can show more of your real feelings (but usually not all... depends on the person really). In my opinion, kuuki wo yomu, ki wo tsukau, doing your omote, and fitting everything in to joge kankei and soto kankei is all very tiring, and is very very difficult for non-Japanese raised people to do properly. I dunno, if you think you can do it, good for you, maybe I just suck. But not all hope is lost! Now remember how I explained there are so many rules, well, luckily, the rules can sometimes be broken. There's another concept, called amae. I googled, and found it to be defined as "to depend and presume upon another's benevolence". Actually, I think this is human universal (at least I do it all the time in all cultures, but also a lot of people consider me to be very immature so lol iunno). Though some people (Doi 1971) have tried to claim it's unique to Japan in adults (though with some controversy). Amae is like a child's relationship to their mother. It's where you ask your mother for a cookie, even though you shouldn't really eat another cookie because it's bad for you, but your mother gives you a cookie because she loves you and will spoil you. It's like when you ask your friends for notes even though you should do the notes yourself. Or it's when you ask your busy coworker/senior to help you with something, that actually you're supposed to do, when they actually really don't have the time to bother... but they still help you anyways. Or basically, in general just asking for anything "against the rules", and expecting to get it. Amae can be done to anyone, but it's usually done to people higher in hierarchy (but who are also uchi), and maybe usually is more successful to the opposite sex (just a guess, I'm actually not sure). It sounds strange, because I kept talking about how breaking the rules will piss people off earlier, and yes, if you fail at amae you will piss people off, but if you succeed, actually everyone is happier somehow. Something about how the amae'd like the feeling of being relied upon, or taking care of someone etc. I am pretty good at amae, and it saved me when I was in Japan, because I found Japanese culture to be difficult, but I could use amae to get people to help me. I was also a cute teenage boy at the time, ymmv. (But even adult males do amae too, just there may be slightly less chances.) That's a quick introduction I guess?
  2. 4 points
    "China’s foreign ministry has announced that foreigners with valid residence permits can enter the country without needing to re-apply for visas from 28 September. Foreigners whose residence permits expired after March 28 can apply for visas at Chinese embassies and consulates for entry, the ministry said in a statement on its website." From The Guardian 23/09/2020
  3. 3 points
    Update for you all, via another forum. The design is from a coin, one of the earlier standardised currencies. 光緒元寶 = Guangxu Yuanbao Your medallion is not likely a real coin converted to a medallion, I'd say merely the design is inspired by the centre part of the coin with a more stylised character set. There are hundreds of such examples of this coin design, and a great many variations of the coin over time. The Guangxu Emperor reigned from from 1875 to 1908, so that fits on the date front...
  4. 3 points
    Since my last post about downloading documents from Baidu and Docin got such an overwhelmingly positive response, I thought I would share this too. I was kind of forced to buy a book on Douban but their platform doesn't really make the material very accessible for studying, and a PDF would be much better. I found this Chrome plugin that will download the book and (for some mystifying reason) email it to you. It has a good rating so I downloaded and ran it. It emailed me a .mobi which I bravely imported into Calibre and converted to PDF without any problems. It even kept the pictures which was nice. https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/gk7-豆瓣阅读推送/lmiobbkpdjmkfhgagdkpgbgonkogbllb/related?hl=zh-CN Disclaimer: I have nothing to do the people who make this. If you are afraid of downloading files that have been emailed to you by a random Chrome plugin, and you don't trust your anti virus software to say it's virus free, then this might not be for you.
  5. 3 points
    Got it, had to 'pin' the extension icon to the window so it would be there to click. Then enter email address, click again, and good to go, turned up in my inbox as a .mobi within a minute, and looks properly formatted in the Kindle desktop app, so no reason to think there'll be any issues sending to my actual Kindle. This is really useful, thanks for the help.
  6. 3 points
    Yea, sorry, you're right. I have a bad habit of bashing Japan when I talk to people about Japan, but it's mainly because just too many people have an overly rosy and superficial view of Japan, and I want people to understand Japan in ways beyond that. But actually, in the end it's because I love Japan too that I want people to understand it more. I don't actually hate Japan, and I feel I am so blessed to have had the opportunity to live there. It really changed my life. Even with my rant about the strictness/rigidness of Japanese culture, I don't just want to say "oh it's horrible" (though it is), but more like want to say that, a lot of the good things in Japan come because of the strictness and rigidness. So, when you appreciate the good things, also appreciate the work behind it. When you enjoy the nice things in Japan, you also have an obligation to... be humble and reciprocate by playing your part as a cog in the machine (oftentimes this is just in very subtle little things and mannerisms, but it can be many things). This is Japanese culture. When you learn to do this, you'll get even more joy from Japan (but it is really really hard). I'll try to think about more positive things to talk about Japan and post here...... sometime...... maybe. XD
  7. 3 points
    The Edinburgh Taiwanese Film Festival has put all its films online for free [edit: numbers limited, see below] - you'd need to create an account and 'rent' them for £0.00. I don't know anything about the movies (they could be on Youtube already for all I know) but thought it might be of interest. Not necessarily in Mandarin, of course. If anyone knows any of the films it'd be useful to have recommendations (or warnings).
  8. 3 points
    It's official, ban is temporarily halted: https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2020/09/20/federal-court-issues-preliminary-injunction-halting-trump-administrations-ban-chinese-app-wechat/
  9. 3 points
    Because Pinyin is a near-lossless phonetic system for transcribing the sounds of Mandarin Chinese. The only phonetic information it fails to capture are some non-phonemic stuff, non-naturalized loanwords, and intonation. Intonation is the only relevant one in the context of this poem, and the speaker in the video doesn't seem to be using very natural intonation in any case, so it isn't much help. In other words, if Pinyin can't render a piece of Chinese text intelligible, neither can reading it aloud in Mandarin Chinese. Spoken Cantonese, Min Nan, reconstructed Middle Chinese pronunciation, and so on might do a better job, depending on the specifics of the dialect and the text. Not sure if you read the article linked to in my post, but here's the relevant part: The point is that, if [《施氏食狮史》] were written in Hanyu Pinyin, everything would be shi … Even if it were written in characters, people still would not be able to understand it when it is read aloud. I think this is part of the story. It seems there's some disagreement as to the extent that classical Chinese evolved from a specific form of the spoken language, which I couldn't comment on. But there's also the fact that Mandarin pronunciation is very different from that of Middle Chinese. Finally, Yuan Ren Chao wrote this in 民国 times, so it's kinda like a modern Italian person writing a contrived text in Latin.
  10. 3 points
    Except people did not speak like this! The poem is a contrived example, much like Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo Because for all intents and purposes, reading pinyin gives you the same level of information as hearing the same thing spoken out loud.
  11. 3 points
    As a self-contained sentence it doesn't need any more context: the guy was the first person cured of HIV, he took the transplantation, the transplantation must have effected the cure (or the sentence would tell us otherwise). The transplantation is therefore historic. The answer is therefore not A, B or C, but D.
  12. 2 points
    There's a 光 at the top there too but I like your theory, wonder if it's a copy of an old silver coin, you'd see 光绪元宝 like this: https://baike.baidu.com/item/光绪元宝/4756974?fr=aladdin As you can see, those two characters are in the right place.
  13. 2 points
    When Takeshi said one reason why Japan is so tidy is that people feel pressure to tidy it up, and that this pressure is a cultural thing, you suggested that Takeshi was wrong, and that this phenomenon of people feeling under pressure to keep their shared environment tidy was actually because of higher living standards. It struck me that there are lots of cities around the world with high living standards but which can't compare with Japanese cities for tidiness. Therefore, it appears to me that you cannot be correct in ascribing this phenomenon to higher living standards. Actually it seems pretty obvious to me that different cultures will encourage and enforce 'collectivist' thinking to greater or lesser degrees. There is a difference between a city having enough money to pay for an army of street cleaners, and a city where everyone regardless of income feels a responsibility to keep the shared environment clean. Different cultures make people behave in different ways - isn't that part of why living in different places is such fun? And I must admit Takeshi 's posts are making me want to revisit Japan.
  14. 2 points
    You can register using the Douban website. It allows registration using mobile (tip: the country codes are arranged by country language! UK is between Australia and Germany) or email address, or the usual Weibo/QQ/ etc. Eventually, you'll have to verify your registration by linking to a mobile number. The good thing about registration via the web is that you may be able to use Paypal (you just buy a chunk of credit to pay for books as you go along), it was working a couple of months ago, I hope it still is. This gets rid of any of Apple's restrictions and may allow you to download the files to convert. You can also download the app from the Apple/Android store, paying is very easy (Apple gets a small cut, but it's not too bad), and you can read your books on the move. The books you buy through the store appear on your website bookshelf. Another good thing is, if you subscribe as a VIP via the App, you can use your 'privileges' also on the website.
  15. 2 points
    I guess the reason Nokia exists is because Finnish people can't stand being in a room together. 😉
  16. 2 points
    我们先了解一下这份作业的需求
  17. 2 points
    New online "at home" HSK exam dates have just been announced for 31 October and 12 December: http://www.chinesetest.cn/gonewcontent.do?id=44581484&fbclid=IwAR2KBgwNNiBSrfqchBwM2xKZCEsLg6_MRpf8FwgfdxCyw6IASFNJCuYDN4U The software looks like it will be the same as in the last batch of exams back in May and June. See the earlier thread for more information.
  18. 2 points
    In the "we're going to need a bigger font" category: 鬣. Oh, sorry... 鬣 氹 is lovely. I imagine, if I was capable of writing Chinese characters without making them look ugly, I'd happily write that one over and over.
  19. 2 points
    Yes here's the MFA announcement dated today, 23 September. https://www.fmprc.gov.cn/mfa_eng/wjbxw/t1817370.shtml Although this is frustrating for those who don't already have a residence permit, it may have the effect of speeding up visa applications for everyone since some people no longer need to apply. In my case I applied for my visa application appointment recently and was given a date 3.5 weeks hence which they said was the earliest available, whereas a colleague of mine applied yesterday at the same Visa Application Centre and was given a date next Tuesday.
  20. 2 points
    Update: There's nothing on their website at present, but the Confucius Institute at Manchester University have just confirmed that they will be running the "at home" online test in December, but not in October.
  21. 2 points
    The first book I read after 活著 (and my 2nd Chinese book overall) was 家 by Ba Jin. It's got romantic elements for sure, but it's definitely more of the "tragic romance" side of things. Aside from a few encounters with Cthulhu that involved quotations from Literary Chinese and and references to contemporary issues I didn't quite understand, I thought it was quite good, though long, and just as easy to read as 活著.
  22. 2 points
    If you've ever browsed for popular old texts on JD or similar websites, you may have come across this series, with the blue borders, the tactile covers with a person or two. I have a few of them (包公案、大明英烈传、小五义、海公案、梦溪笔谈、等). They're uniformly 306-308 pages, and they all claim 330,000 character totals. You do not want them. They very haphazardly edit books down to 330,000. My other copy of 七侠五义 is 565,000. Even worse, 隋唐演义, which other websites claim to be 750,000字 is available by them in one 330,000 volume. For instance, look at this paragraph. And compare that to the text given in other sources:   且说包兴奉了包公之命,寄信回家,后又到隐逸村。这日包兴回来,叩见包公,呈上书信,言:“太老爷太夫人甚是康健,听见老爷得了府尹,欢喜非常,赏了小人五十两银子。小人又见大老爷大夫人,欢喜自不必说,也赏了小人三十两银子。   惟有大夫人给小人带了个薄薄儿包袱,嘱咐小人好好收藏,到京时交付老爷。小人接在手中,虽然有些分两,不知是何物件,惟恐路上磕碰。还是大夫人见小人为难,方才说明,此包内是一面古镜,原是老爷井中捡的。因此镜光芒生亮,大夫人挂在屋内。有一日,二夫人使唤的秋香,走至大夫人门前滑了一跤,头已跌破,进屋内就在挂镜处一照,谁知血滴镜面,忽然云翳开豁。秋香大叫一声,回头跑在二夫人屋内,冷不防按住二夫人,将右眼挖出;从此疯癫,至今锁禁,犹如活鬼一般。二夫人死去两三番,现在延医调治,尚未痊愈。小人见二老爷,他无精打采的,也赏了小人二两银子。”说着话将包袱呈上。包公也不开看,吩咐好好收讫。包兴又回道:“小人又见宁师老爷看了书信十分欢喜,说叫老爷好好办事,尽忠报国,还教导了小人好些话。小人在家住了一天,即到隐逸村报喜投书。李大人大喜,满口应承,随后便送小姐来就亲。赏了小人一个元宝两匹尺头,并回书一封。”即将书呈上。包公接着看毕,原来是张氏夫人同着小姐于月内便可来京,立刻吩咐预备住处,仍然派人前去迎接。便叫包兴暂且歇息,次日再商量办喜事一节。 I'm curious to hear other's opinions. I find the original, in the text, to be pretty easy. I spent two hours confusedly trying to figure out who everybody was and what was going on in the image text. I've shown two Chinese people the text and they say it's just barely understandable and quite outrageously done.
  23. 2 points
    @Polyhistor the Zhonghua Shuju versions are often fascimiles of authoritative Qing Dynasty texts, or else based on the highest standard of textual scholarship and consensus available for the published texts. Sure there are other good versions of things, with modern commentaries and/or explanations, but if you really want to be sure you are reading accurate, consultable versions of these texts then you won't find more accurate or more authoritative versions of the texts than the ones Zhonghua Shuju put out.
  24. 2 points
    No, those aren't the real words I'm looking for. That's just one publisher of which I own a single book out of the 384 in my collection. There are plenty of other high quality books by other publishers, and I wouldn't want to dissuade people from them if I offered a specific publishing house. I specifically pointed out 全本全注全译 because they, or variations, appear on various other covers of books which I hold in high regard for the value of their scholarship. A couple more I'd recommend looking out for are 无删减, unabridged. Or 导读, as in this series, which are summaries in 普通话 of each chapter
  25. 2 points
    The real words you are looking for are the ones at the bottom - zhonghua shuju. Publisher is everything for mainland chinese books and they're the best.
  26. 2 points
    No, for the same reasons that Hanyu Pinyin is not a system for spelling Classical Chinese.
  27. 2 points
    D is the only correct answer out of A/B/C/D. The "would" is not necessary: your "that later made history" would be OK. But I think the "would" is very natural here, probably because it adds an emphasis that at the time nothing was definite: he might not do the transplantation, it might not be successful. My feeling is that the "would" is a gentle reminder or emphasis that history would have been different if different decisions were made. Back then no one knew it was a "will make history", just a "could make history (if x, y and z)." An alternative: "... that went on to make history". Or: "that would go on to make history".
  28. 2 points
    A. could have later made — Refers to a hypothetical that never happened in reality. It could have made history, but in fact it never did. B. should have later made — Same as A, but the author believes the event ought to have happened. C. might make later — This one is grammatical only in the way that "Colorless green ideas sleep furiously" is. The sentence doesn't make sense. D. would later make — This one is correct, because the event did happen. Even without knowing about Timothy Ray Brown's story, you can infer that this is the correct answer because it introduces him as "the first man cured of HIV" and uses the word "initially", implying that he later accepted it. You can think of "would" as the past tense of "will". Timeline: |------------------------| ^a ^b ^c Point a is the point of reference (in our example, the point at which Timothy Ray Brown opted out of the treatment) Point b is the event (being cured of HIV, thus making history) Point c is now At point a, we could say "if this treatment works, it will make history". From point c, we say that (as of point a) it "would later make history". Hope that makes sense. Tense/aspect in English is pretty weird.
  29. 2 points
    If its helpful for reference, I use an external keyboard for all my devices (the one in my post about cangjie) as I can type a lot faster and more comfortably that way. As a result, I do have a cangjie gboard on my phone, and when Im out and about and dont have access to my physical keyboard, I still use the virtual cangjie keyboard for typing. I have built up 'thumb typing' muscle memory for cangjie, again for the sake of practicing character recall. I'm quite happy I have though, because typing like this is way quicker and more comfortable than handwriting recognition from my experience. That being said, I would love it if anyone knows of any T9 cangjie keyboards for android, or even swype-style gesture keyboards based on cangjie? That would be the holy grail...making shapes that relate to shapes that relate to characters, interesting research to be done there...
  30. 2 points
    A number of books I recommend if you want to know more about this type of language and how to transform it into good Chinese: 陳雲(陳雲係筆名,作者本名陳雲根):《中文解毒》、《執正中文》 古德明:《中華正聲》、《真假中文》 Ji Fengyuan: 《Linguistic Engineering: Language and Politics in Mao's China》 Warning: The above Chinese books are available only in traditional script. Having said that, I would also recommend the following if you want to be able to write good Chinese: 思果:《翻譯研究》、《翻譯新究》、《譯道探微》 余光中:《翻譯乃大道》 Disclaimer: 諸位有欲購上列書籍者,宜先閱其預覽頁,然後決定購買與否。由於書籍不合脾胃而造成經濟損失,Kenny同志不負責啊。
  31. 2 points
    I've done Chinese-to-English translation myself (monolingually-raised native English speaker) and also worked alongside other translators, most of whom were monolingually-raised native Chinese speakers. The best of them weren't able to produce truly "native-like" English, but that didn't mean their translations were bad or worthless. On the contrary, many times they could capture nuances in the source that I would have totally missed. Working together, them translating and me editing, we could produce better and faster results than either of us could individually. And for lower-priority copy that didn't need to be so polished, they could easily do a good-enough job without needing my help at all. Don't put yourself down Kenny! I'd rank your Chinese-to-English translations as on a par with some of the best I've worked with, which is no small feat.
  32. 1 point
    亲爱的曹露明: 你好! 好久不见了,我非常想念你,不仅是我,所有的学生想到你就垂涎三尺。我们在课堂里外确实产生了很多故事。 无论如何,没有您,摩洛哥的生活越来越糟糕了,我们仍然有新冠病疫情,而且我们被捆在房屋里,我脑子里都是你?我们正在为考试而苦苦挣扎,但我正在努力学习,每天都在练习写作技巧和听力,我认为如果你知道,我肯定能赢得你的心。 老师,你好吗? 你还在和他们那个吗? 我的同学非常想念你,我们也经常谈论你,希望你能回到摩洛哥,让我们能再次体会到你。希望早日收到你的来信。 祝学习愉快!身体健康! 你的朋姚明 2020年9月26日
  33. 1 point
  34. 1 point
    知音/知心姐姐 (rather than 知音大姐)might be a good option. If the lady is much much older than you, however, 知音/知心阿姨 will be better.
  35. 1 point
    @imron Hi, yo1 syllable cannot be typed with tonemark even in 'checked' mode whether with seperate characters or diacritics. No inconvenience, it's just for your information. It's in 哎哟. - Sorry, I confused, I had to switch to 'unchecked' mode instead. It's typed properly.
  36. 1 point
    Hey guys, im currently based in Beijing and I'm a restorer of vintage flying pigeons and forevers here, so if anyone's interested in getting one, i'd be happy to help you get your hands on one.
  37. 1 point
    Alright, update on this exchange. I had 192 cards for my next volume of the novel, and just ran through them all, getting 49% this time. Basically, I did all the same things as the first time around. As I read, I added words that I felt I had seen more than once or that I felt I should know into a deck. Except, instead of ignoring the deck, this time I set it up in Pleco so that it would randomly pull 10-20 cards so that I could do brief reviews. These reviews usually took about 2 minutes, tops. Sometimes I did them 2-3 times per day, but rarely more than that. Anyway... a 16% boost in words learned for 2-3 minutes per day is pretty good, I think! I feel a lot better about it now, and maybe for deck three I'll tinker with some of Pleco's SRS settings so that the study is even more efficient. ...I should mention that I still get the tones wrong on a number of my "learned" words. I should definitely start policing myself better on that.
  38. 1 point
    嗯, or at least that's how the sound is transcribed
  39. 1 point
    那我先... whatever you're going to do. 去学习,休息,找小刘打牌. Very natural way to leave. There's nothing at all wrong with 啊, but keep it short and light, like a 呢 or 吧.
  40. 1 point
    No no, the book club moves at the speed you read. You can join anytime and read at whatever speed you like. Just see it as a dedicated thread to discuss and enjoy a specific book.
  41. 1 point
    I highly recommend the online manhua 课堂中的她. You might find it a bit challenging, but there’s an official English translation that may make it a bit more approachable, and it’s not very long.
  42. 1 point
    I couldn’t find an official announcement yet, but after the Saturday hearing it appears that the WeChat executive order will be enjoined. The federal lawyers anticipate a loss and have asked the plaintiffs in the case to post a bond. They wouldn’t bother to do this if the executive order goes into effect as planned. https://mobile.twitter.com/AnupamChander/status/1307433515345215489 Just to be clear, this was the expected outcome since the judge presiding over the case already indicated she was buying the arguments made by the WeChat User Alliance. But many news outlets keep lumping the TikTok executive order with the WeChat one, confusing things considerably.
  43. 1 point
    Or more particularly, where is the Chinese E.B. White, an author who not only popularised clear, simple prose of understated elegance in his own works but who also set out the principles of good writing for others to follow.
  44. 1 point
    @马M I've added stroke gifs and audio for the first 2000 characters or so. I'll gradually do the rest and hopefully words too.
  45. 1 point
    That's odd - we did just release an iOS 14 update today which should show up shortly, but I'm not aware of anything in iOS 14 that would force a non-updated app to have black bars; what model of iPhone do you have? (there's a rumor that Apple's going to launch a smaller-form-factor Face ID iPhone next month, and apps might display awkwardly on that, but it shouldn't affect any other phones unless they screwed up somewhere) (that being said, if you view a lot of EPUBs or PDFs in our document reader I wouldn't necessarily rush to download that update - we had to replace the HTML renderer in order to comply with an Apple requirement, and we had to replace the PDF renderer because the license for the old PDF renderer was up for renewal, so while we tested the new versions of those two things extensively, they might nonetheless be a little buggy with some documents) EDIT: I should add that on the approval front they seem to be doing a good job keeping things moving fast - we originally submitted this update on Tuesday a few hours after iOS 14 went GM, but we then had to pull and resubmit it (without it having been reviewed yet) twice; the latest version was uploaded at 12:41pm yesterday, reviewed at 5:51pm and approved at 6:04pm, so about a 5-and-a-half hour turnaround despite entering the queue almost a whole day after they started accepting submissions. (it's possible this process is mostly / entirely automated now and they're just not telling people about that - e.g. a bot downloads the app, automatically checks it for crashes / private APIs, diffs some screenshots and all the human has to do is double check the screenshots that changed to make sure we're not doing something nefarious like linking to our online store)
  46. 1 point
    Thanks Mungouk, might consider it if time allows
  47. 1 point
    Formication has always been one of my favourite obscure words. No, it's not a typo, and it has nothing to do with redecorating your kitchen.
  48. 1 point
    I've recently bought two of the graded readers Pleco has on offer - the 1000 and 1500 word level graded readers from Sinolingua. The readers are great (content-wise I'd put them above any of the other graded reader series I've come across, ), but I'm finding some of the Pleco Reader functionality (or lack thereof?) slightly annoying. My previous experience with Pleco Reader is limited to importing txt-files. These are not paginated, you scroll downward as you read the text. With the graded readers, however, the pages are numbered and you swipe to the side to change page. Also, at the bottom of the screen there is a progress bar that can be used to quickly skip to the next or previous chapter. (See the attached screenshot) Here's my gripes, which I am posting because I suspect there might be ways to get around them that I have not been able to find myself. 1. The progress bar at the bottom. Is it possible to turn this thing off? Or to require two taps rather than one before the chapter change is made? It might be because I'm clumsy, but I very frequently (every day) find myself touching this bar by accident, taking me to the next chapter of the reader. There is no way (that I have been able to find) to conveniently return to the page you were on prior to making the accidental chapter change, so unless you have a bookmark saved your will need return to the last chapter and swipe away for an annoying amount of time (if you can even remember what page you were on). 2. No "go to page" function. Related to the first point, if there was a function that would allow me to specify which page of which chapter I would like to go to, getting back to the page from which I made an accidental departure would be much faster. 3. Occasionally the reader forgets which page I was on when I last exited the Pleco app. I read through the whole 1000 word reader without this being an issue, Pleco would always remember where I left off when I chose "Reopen last file". With the 1500 word reader, it seems to forget where I left off most of the time (but only if I kill the app). "Reopen last file" then takes me to the first page of the chapter I am currently reading. I don't know if chapter size plays a role here, I am only in chapter 2 of the 1500 word reader and it contains 163 pages (whereas none of the chapters in the 1000 word reader were even half of that). Currently, I'm coping with this by making bookmarks relatively frequent, but even if the process of doing this just takes a few seconds, I find this short breaks to take away some of my focus. Any suggestions? @mikelove or anyone else? Have I missed something in the options department? My biggest issue is definitely with the progress bar.
  49. 1 point
    Reading List, from zero to native material (traditional characters) 1 DeFrancisReaders-BeginningChineseReader 87, 1341, 1341, 100, 399, 399, 3, 13 2 DeFrancisReaders-IntermediateChineseReader 77, 2449, 3790, 100, 401, 800, 6, 29 3 DeFrancisReaders-AdvancedChineseReader 79, 3073, 6863, 100, 400, 1200, 7, 46 4 ReadingsInChineseCulture-Book1 90, 257, 7120, 62, 163, 1363, 1, 47 5 TalesAndTraditions-Book1 95, 146, 7266, 43, 107, 1470, 1, 48 6 ReadingsInChineseCulture-Book2 91, 153, 7419, 40, 72, 1542, 2, 49 7 TalesAndTraditions-Book2 91, 163, 7582, 41, 93, 1635, 1, 50 8 ReadingsInChineseCulture-Book3 88, 183, 7765, 48, 84, 1719, 2, 51 9 TalesAndTraditions-Book3 82, 313, 8078, 59, 139, 1858, 2, 52 10 ReadingsInChineseCulture-Book4 86, 180, 8258, 67, 89, 1947, 2, 53 11 TalesAndTraditions-Book4 69, 377, 8635, 62, 150, 2097, 2, 54 12 ReadingsInChineseCulture-Book5 90, 278, 8913, 61, 115, 2212, 2, 55 13 SupplementaryChineseReaders-ChineseMoralTales 92, 379, 9292, 47, 82, 2294, 4, 57 14 SupplementaryChineseReaders-ChineseCustomsAndTraditions1 94, 477, 9769, 60, 118, 2412, 4, 58 15 SupplementaryChineseReaders-ChineseCustomsAndTraditions2 77, 337, 10106, 56, 104, 2516, 3, 59 16 SupplementaryChineseReaders-ChineseFolkTales1 92, 503, 10609, 42, 101, 2617, 4, 61 17 SupplementaryChineseReaders-ChineseFolkTales2 89, 666, 11275, 58, 126, 2743, 5, 63 18 SupplementaryChineseReaders-StoriesFromChineseHistory1 90, 401, 11676, 59, 107, 2850, 3, 64 19 SupplementaryChineseReaders-StoriesFromChineseHistory2 80, 619, 12295, 70, 150, 3000, 4, 65 20 ThoughtAndSociety 91, 568, 12863, 42, 68, 3068, 8, 69 21 SupplementaryChineseReaders-SelectedContemporaryChineseEssays 48, 535, 13398, 73, 153, 3221, 3, 70 22 SupplementaryChineseReaders-SelectedContemporaryChineseShortStories 51, 690, 14088, 71, 143, 3364, 4, 71 23 AReaderInPostCulturalRevolutionChineseLiterature 73, 2597, 16685, 56, 403, 3767, 6, 76 24 TheIndependentReader 79, 2123, 18808, 52, 137, 3904, 15, 80 This list was created based on the vocabulary lists linked in this thread. Only words which were also found in the handedict or cc-cedict were considered to filter out names, expressions, typos etc. Explanation of the numbers: Percentage of words in this book which passed the dictionary filter Number of new words in this book Accumulated number of words Percentage of new words in this book (out of all words in this book) New characters in this book Accumulated number of characters New words per new character in this book Percentage of TOCFL words covered (out of the 7293)
  50. 1 point
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