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Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/11/2017 in all areas

  1. 15 points
    I think there are a few points of confusion here. One is that your friend didn’t understand what you were trying to say even after you clarified, another is that you are not using 再也不 for the right situations, and the last is that you are unsure of the differences between 能 and 會. For the first problem, your friend probably got confused by your use of 再也不 and then tried to give you a better way to say what he thought you wanted to say using 再也不. But you shouldn’t have used 再也不 in the first place to express what you were trying to express because it talks about the situation moving forward from the reference point. So if you say it while talking about now, you’re explaining what will happen in the future, i.e. I won’t play anymore and I won’t be able to play anymore. 再也不⋯了 and 不⋯了 mean different things. 再也 carries the notion of “never again.” 不⋯了 just means you did something before and now you’re not doing it. But in my understanding, you are saying that you are finding you suck at this game now (can’t play), when you did not suck as much in the past (could play). When we talk about skill/ability in doing something, especially like playing games, we use 會. 他很會玩 or 他會玩 or 他不會玩 can all be used to say that he is good or bad at the game. You can insult someone by insinuating they 不會玩. But 會 can also express volition, which is what you express when you say 再也不會, which means “will never again.” When I play 王者榮耀 for too long on my phone, and my head starts to hurt because I haven’t stayed hydrated or have squinted too hard or whatever, I will put down my phone (usually after losing) and say something like 不能再玩了 to my friends to explain that I can’t keep playing with them anymore. If my understanding is correct, you really should have just said 我(怎麼/已經/突然)不會玩了. If you suddenly discover you suck: 我(突然)不會玩了 If you won’t play ever again, for any reason: 我再也不會玩了 If you can’t (not allowed, broke your arm, etc.) play ever again, for some reason: 我再也不能玩了 If you aren’t going to keep playing in the immediate future: 我不玩了
  2. 7 points
    It would be strange here in Kunming. People would wonder about your motives. Is he selling something? Is this a scam? What I do is talk to people about something that I'd genuinely like to know. Today at lunch in a small shop specializing in stewed chicken and noodles 卤鸡, I asked the boss what kind of chickens he uses for best results; what kind of chickens I should buy at the market if ever wanted to try and make his signature dish at home, like after leaving Kunming and returning to the US. Chatted back and forth with that as a starting point. Wasn't hard because I go there often and he's friendly; figured he would not mind. He's a very good cook, versatile and smart, but I figure he must get kind of bored, making the same two or three things over and over every day. And his conversation with the customers is usually along the lines of: "大碗,中碗,小碗?" Customer replies, "多少钱?" and then they wrap it up. Not a lot of mental stimulation in that exchange. He offered to show me how he makes it and he even offered to give me some stock that I could take home to use in stewing a chicken that I bought on my own. Pretty generous and helpful. But it probably wasn't great as language practice. His Mandarin has lots of Yunnan dialect mixed in and I was not speaking carefully. He was sitting at the cash register. All the customers in the shop stopped what they were doing and listened in to our conversation. The place became silent, all six tables.
  3. 6 points
    Great perspective, important to remember this. About 6 months ago I went to the tiny airport just outside my city to pick up my best friend who was visiting me here in China from the UK. His luggage got sent to Amsterdam, and it was up to me and the non-english-speaking airport staff to get it sorted out. I remember all communication was done clearly, no repetitions. The bag arrived on the same day that evening. The airport called me to pick it up. Once I had the bag in my hand at the airport, it was like getting my graduation certificate. I called a didi and actually cried out of happiness as I waited at the arrivals entrance. That was a great moment in my life. Congratulations on passing the test today @abcdefg
  4. 5 points
    If anyone's interested, I just came across a massive selection of Chinese fonts: https://chinesefontdesign.com/
  5. 5 points
    You can adjust speaking speed a few different ways: 1) If you're playing a digital file, your digital file player might have the ability to slow down the speed of the file. 2) Pick a speaker or genre who speaks more slowly. Newscasters always speak really fast, for example. They would be a bad choice. Shadowing also shouldn't be done with new material all the time. Shadowing material you're extremely familiar with is beneficial, because you can then work on what you actually want to improve. Working with material you're unfamiliar with means that you're never sure what the speaker is saying next, so you're expending more brain-effort/energy trying to guess what comes next. Working with material you're familiar with means that you can anticipate what the speaker is going to say next, so you can spend more effort focusing on whatever it is you are trying to correct (e.g. saying your 3rd tones, collocation, etc). When I was shadowing I would spend one whole week working only one 30 minute speech. In some practice sessions, I would only be working on 5 minutes of the speech on repeat. You don't need a large quantity of new material to do shadowing. You just really need about 1-2 hours of appropriate material, and just keep using it on repeat. I've spent an entire hour-long practice session just working on a 1-2 minute segment of the speech, because it contained certain things that were particularly problematic for me. So I isolated that section, and just shadowed it on repeat while recording myself, and then listened to the recording, noticed what I did badly in comparison, and then repeating the process all over again. For speeches where the speaker was way the hell too fast for me to shadow word-for-word, I would practice the following things: summarizing the meaning of what they said in Chinese (probably only useful if you are learning interpreting, like I was) only picking out word collocations or grammatical connectors. e.g. which words go together. So I wouldn't necessarily shadow the whole speech, but rather speech structures or parts of speech. For example, 因为……,但是…… (cause-effect, grammar);奠定……基础 (verb-noun collocation)...... the choices are endless. When you're working on #2, it's really difficult to do with brand new content, because you have no way to anticipate what the speaker is saying. It's better to do that with an audio or video file that you are familiar with. Also, it's better to just work on a small section of audio or video at a time. In this case, quality of study is definitely prioritized over quantity and variety of material.
  6. 5 points
    I saw the water-boiling analogy the other day in an article about piano practice. It said that, in order to master a difficult passage, you can't simply do it a little bit each day and hope to some day get it right... Their advice was to sit down and focus completely on getting it right. And it said not to stop the first time you get it right, but instead it said you should get it right 4 times in a row before moving along. It even suggested to place 4 pencils on one side of the piano and moving one pencil each time you get it right, until all four are on the other side. It's like boiling water: You can't heat it a little bit each day and hope it will boil some day: You must keep adding lots of heat until it boils. This left me thinking if the same advice could be applied to some areas of language learning. We usually hear the advice to study just a little bit each day, so as not to get overwhelmed, especially if you use SRS. But I guess for some things, "keep adding heat until it reaches boiling point" could be a better advice. This is similar to the concept of something reaching "critical mass". For example: The din in the head Krashen mentioned that the "din in the head", the inner voice that starts speaking in L2, only appears after several hours of intensive listening. In his experience, this happened after sitting for several hours to listen to a lecture in German that mentioned him personally. He was obviously very invested in knowing what the lecturer was saying. In another instance, an art restoration professional working in Russia had to listen to Russian all day long in order to get her work done. In both cases, the "din in the head" appeared. I guess this does not happen to those who just schedule two italki lessons per week... You need several works of intensive L2 listening for it to appear. Hanzi I believe that trying to learn the hanzi over the course of several years is not too useful: 500 is not enough for reading, neither 1,000, nor 1,500: You need around 3,000 and a several-thousand word vocabulary in order for the hanzi to actually be useful. If you do this over several years, you'll spend way more time reviewing (or re-learning) than actually reaping the benefits. I believe you need to sit down and do an extra effort over a short period of time in order to "bring water to boiling point". So, what do you guys think? Are there any areas in your studies where you have noticed that turning up the flames until the water boils is a better strategy?
  7. 4 points
    Definitely best time of the year for good Chinese green tea! Yesterday evening I bought a package of 蒙顶柿花 and 蒙顶甘露, both came from Sichuan and hit the shelves here in Europe. Tea shops in Europe get their teas first from Sichuan, the second batch comes from Yunnan and then from the eastern coast. Both 蒙顶 are great, although for pre-Qingming teas I'm recommending a more Japanese-like approach and using a slightly lower temperature water (around 65 Celsius degrees) and longer brewing time compared to "normal" green teas, in order to bring the best flavors out of the fresh leaves.
  8. 4 points
    There's a link to try out one of their prototype translators. I stuck in a bit of news, and got this: "With the continuous deepening of Belt and Road policy communication, facilities interconnection, trade facilitation, financial interconnection and people-to-people interconnection, Belt and Road news media exchanges and cooperation have flourished. In order to further facilitate information exchange and resource sharing among Belt and Road news media, and enhance people-to-people friendly exchanges and cultural exchanges and mutual learning among relevant countries, we will promote Belt and Road cooperation with the spirit of peace, openness, tolerance, mutual learning and mutual benefit, mutual benefit, mutual benefit, mutual benefit, mutual benefit, mutual benefit and mutual benefit and mutual benefit." It's pretty good, but I think that last sentence could use a thesaurus.
  9. 4 points
    Hi Poglog, and welcome to the forum! I think this will depend on who you are volunteering for, and also your nationality. To get an F visa you will need a letter of invitation from the organization with which you are going to volunteer. I think you would be wise to start off by asking the advice of the organization in question, and they can tell you their experience with previous volunteers. A tourist visa will be less hassle as far as the documents you need, but, depending on your nationality, you might not be able to get a tourist visa which spans a long enough time for your stay. You also need to find out whether or not volunteering with this organization is considered as 'work', because if it is you risk getting in trouble if you do it on a tourist visa. Just to confirm, did you mean a tourist visa or a work visa? Tourist is L, work is Z.
  10. 4 points
    There is a fair amount of stuff online for teaching large classes. Including stuff directed at Chinese schools. Essentially, in a class of 30-60 you’re going to need to try and use mixed teams and pair work. For the mixed teams, make someone the team leader and give them some kind of responsibility. For example, giving out worksheets, organising the team, making sure everyone is working etc. You can rotate team leaders. There is 100% opportunity for role play in large classes. If you’ve got mixed teams, they don’t need to stand up to do it. Just do it sat down. I’m not sure of the level but try put everything in a question and answer or at least a sentence. If you’re teaching one word vocabulary then they’ll likely say one word. Once you’ve got a nice Q/A for them to practice just think / find team or pair games that involves using that. A no-prep example would be “rock paper scissors”. Introduce the question so students understand (e.g. a video, a demo, role play, modelling) then do some drilling. For a big class you can drill as a class, by team, by row, by boy/girl etc. Mix it up. You then demo how to “play”. For this you’d ideally use a teaching assistant. If not, a student. Show them how to play RPS and that the “winner” gets to ask the question. Repeat a few times. Play again and ask “who asks?” To check understanding. Once that’s done break off into pairs and groups. Walk round and listen. If your class students aren’t confident, you can avoid individual correction at first during this phase. Just walk round and make notes. Stop the class and review together the different issues you spotted. You can do this written or verbal depending on the level. For older students, write them up and get them to come to the front to write the correction. If you have some time, see if any pairs want to stand up and demonstrate for the class. You can also pick a few that have tried hard during pairwork. Replace RPS with another pair or group activity and repeat the process. You can buy small dice very cheaply and they can be useful for a lot of activities. I used to like having a question up like: What do you like to do? I like to _____ 1) play ball 2) dance 3) fly a kite etc I then gave each pair a dice and a cup. The dice MUST remain in the cup. The student without the cup asks the question. The student with the cup shakes it (with hand over the cup) and looks at the dice. If the dice is (1) then they use answer 1 from the board. Hope it helps!
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