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Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/16/2018 in Blog Comments

  1. 4 points
  2. 3 points
    I'm not familiar with 蕭紅, but I've read a fair amount of 魯迅, therefore not surprised by the style. It was 1935. 白話文 or written vernacular Chinese was far from mature. There's a lot of experiments going on. Sometimes a writer would even deliberately pursue a 'translationese' style.
  3. 3 points
    It's to discourage "squatters", who may choose to balance precariously with their feet on the toilet rim.
  4. 2 points
    漂流, I guess, rafting.
  5. 2 points
    It’s funny how that kind of thing is just so completely “foreign” (for want of a better word) to many western countries. I remember reading about a Chinese guide who worked in the U.K. temporarily. He had to accompany some elderly folk on a tour and said it was a nightmare because everything he said to try be polite made them unhappy. Things like wear more clothes, sit and have a rest for a bit, etc
  6. 2 points
    I turned 30 at the end of last year, and im one of the older ones. There are about 4-5 of us late 20s early 30s, one is late 30s, the rest are early-mid 20s (around 15-20 students). I would guess that the age of starting English correlates with the age starting this course. From what Ive seen, the ones that are 21 started English with private tutoring from a young age. The majority are typical in starting English at 初中, then consistently working really hard for about 10 years to reach this level.
  7. 2 points
    I know how much everyone has been dying to know how the manhole reconstruction near my apartment has been progressing, so here's an update. They removed the old sofa once the cement had set, but it started cracking almost immediately. It has been re-done again, and now a another sofa has been put in place (as well as a couple of chairs for the manhole a bit further back). I really can't imagine where all this old furniture keeps coming from...
  8. 2 points
    No doubt at some stubborn relic of feudal superstition 😡 ETA beside a cemetery I presume?
  9. 2 points
    All my Chinese friends are aware of "Chinglish" and use the word like that, not in a Chinese translation. I think it kind of transcends the border between the Chinese-speaking world and the English-speaking world.
  10. 2 points
    Because traditionally Chinese writers write on 稿紙 and are paid by the number of pages/lines. There's an anecdote from early 20th century in which a publisher insisted on paying by the exact character count. To teach them a lesson, a writer (I forget who) submitted his manuscript without punctuation or whitespace. The publisher caved.
  11. 2 points
    Last year I read 丁玲’s novella《沙菲女士的日记》. It made quite an impression, so I was up to read more from her. Recently, I read an English-language article about 丁玲. The article mentioned two pieces 丁玲 wrote at Yan’an that led to her getting denounced by Mao and the party leadership. Those two pieces are《三八节有感》and《我在霞村的时候》.
  12. 2 points
    Here's a link to that article, if anyone wants to read it. Best of luck with this effort and I look forward to your inexorable progress!
  13. 2 points
  14. 2 points
    Not so neat if you check the etymology of the English word 'typhoon'.
  15. 1 point
    That blue board reads 'In coming visiters please be noted, today the kayaking section is closed' 漂 here takes its meaning of 'movement' combine with the local 'situation' means : kayaking So it is dirfting alone the river, it is a correct term in Chinese for kayaking. Both 漂移 (Drifting with an automobile) and 漂流(drifting with a kayake or a small boat) can take the short term of just '漂', but it has to be in such situation, cos most of the time it will mean 'floating' (which i'm sure you will get why it means kayaking here right? XD floating on river and drifting by it) P.S. but of course there is the other two common use for 漂 as it often means bleaching (as 漂白=bleaching into white--[as for cloth and paper making and food making industry], 漂黑=bleaching into black--[as middle age people sometimes like to dye their gray hair back to youth colour], etc.) When combine with '亮(shining)' as 漂亮 then it means 'beautiful' or 'great job (someone did something beautifully well)'.
  16. 1 point
  17. 1 point
    @Jim Yes, but I think the main point is you're welcome even if you're buying books.
  18. 1 point
    Congratulations on your progress and thank you for sharing with us all this interesting information, your brain must be very sharp with all this training. Great report and very helpful for people contemplating a career in interpreting. I'm also very happy to know that your Bath University course turned out to be such a high standard, it's good to hear that not all courses have been decimated by lack of staff and funding. I always felt a little sorry for the interpreters working in those big meetings at the UN, EU, G20 and others, though most look surprisingly cool and at ease. I'd be a hopeless bundle of nerves, definitely consecutive interpreting wouldn't have been the field for me. May I ask what motivates you to choose this so difficult area? You must like a challenge!
  19. 1 point
    This is fantastic. Keep it up! I truly do admire all the hard work you are putting in! As I was reading this I kept thinking "I must remember to comment to see some photos of these notes" and suddenly I scrolled down to see them. Perfect! I really find it amazing how advanced this skill is. Just the sentence ... ..that's extremely scary, but also extremely exciting. You already seem to be so far ahead of where I am with my learning, yet you still are looking 5 years ahead. I love the idea of just keep pushing on with a second language, and when you add interpreting on top of that, amazing. Just had a question, what are the ages of people on the course? Thanks for the update!
  20. 1 point
    The electronic version of 《熊猫》 I read was an online .txt rip, not an officially published e-version. Curious what was in those footnotes. Footnotes and endnotes in a book are interesting, not just because the content of the notes, but also because of what notes do to the reader, how they break up narrative flow, how they force eyeballs and concentration to leave the body text momentarily for some other text that might amplify the narrative or be ancillary to it or be a fascinating digression or something altogether unnecessary. A few years ago I read David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest, a book whose endnotes have footnotes, in hardcover. Halfway through the book I realized that the act of flipping pages—one page at a time, or to a page at the end of the book and back again—was as important (and as arbitrary) as the act of scanning text with the eye line-by-line. It was a powerful moment when I realized how form could be used, even in traditional media (e.g., a physical book), to mount a conceptual challenge against the modern world.
  21. 1 point
    Enjoyment tip: Read H. M. Pulham, Esquire: A Novel by John P. Marquand before reading 《半生缘》. This was used as a basis for the story's concept and setup, but it is quite interesting to see how it was then adapted and changed into a historical Chinese context. Also, find something really really happy to read afterwards
  22. 1 point
    Errm, just in case you run out of books to read... these are the books I set aside for the First Chapter project (will get to it as soon as I've finished reviewing all the things I bought during the recent online shopping spree lol)
  23. 1 point
    "The trays themselves are plastic and easily wiped down . . ." But when your fries scoot out of the little packet onto that wiped-down plastic tray, would you eat them? Or dip them into ketchup you've squeezed right onto that tray?
  24. 1 point
    I've always thought that the little slip of paper they put on the trays is a bit of a waste of paper (the trays themselves are plastic and easily wiped down, negating the need for the paper), so it's a little ironic that the paper itself is carrying an anti-waste message.
  25. 1 point
    Reminds me of an old Hong Kong movie where the staff nicknamed their super-stingy boss 老三张.
  26. 1 point
  27. 1 point
    Here's another one in a similar vein. And the distinctly unpoetic...
  28. 1 point
    These are also available for your Loved One:
  29. 1 point
    Soon you'll find out... I don't know... I don't watch much TV these days... but maybe 一仆二主? or 欢乐颂?
  30. 1 point
    It's very interesting to read how you are learning SI. I understand it can be quite challenging. A Chinese attorney who lives in the US said he had been involved in business deals where only ~30% of the translation was correct. These were business deals involving life sciences & pharmaceuticals, so terminology was a challenge (as you illustrated). His message was "use good translators." I expect those he was referring to were not trained translators, but just those who did so as part of their jobs because they were perceived as having good language skills.
  31. 1 point
    Thanks @imron. Still on track! In addition to the works listed in my post, I am reading two longer works, each over 100,000 characters. Since I am tens of thousands of characters in, that puts me over 27%.
  32. 1 point
    My guess is that it's the place where you can burn the little pieces of paper on which your fortune is printed, what the Japanese call "omikuiji." I'm not really up on what you do with these things if you don't like the fortune they predict, but if it's good, my wife takes it home and shows it to her mother and her friends. I don't know what she does with it if it's bad. However, in Japan there's a place like a bulletin board you can tie it to to make sure it comes true. If, as I suspect, you can ask personal questions and receive real answers, then maybe people want to destroy any personal information or advice. Anyway, just random speculation on my part... TBZ
  33. 1 point
    Some temples have them too, though usually not as big as this.
  34. 1 point
    I've heard native speakers use it and I use it.
  35. 1 point
    Didn't they open a FamilyMart or 7-Eleven in Edinburgh yet? 😉
  36. 1 point
    @mungouk -- Those are laughably terrible! Not even Google Translate could produce such a mess. A peek behind the scenes is in order: Dishwasher Wang to Frycook Zhang: Listen Zhang, don't you think we need an English menu to give this place some class and draw in more tourist dollars? Frycook to Dishwasher: Absolutely, Wang. I've mentioned to Lao Yang but he said he's too busy with other matters just now to get it done professionally. I plan to ask my nephew's middle son to help us with the project. Even though he's only 12, Teacher Li says his English is absolutely amazing. Three days later, Lao Yang, the boss 老板 proudly tacks up the menu boards on the walls of his new 小吃店 snack shack. Thus another Chinglish menu 英文菜单 is born and Lao Yang pulls ahead in the crazy race to restaurant success.
  37. 1 point
    Sounds like you are learning lots. Hope this semester is similarly fruitful.
  38. 1 point
    for note 1: In this case as 'I've stoped (to write my) diary' in this certain case, chinese won't use 'stoped', chinese would use ' I didn't' The common use here would be: 7月15日我没有继续。 Here are some tricks: Chinese likes to use arabic numerals (although it was made by Indians rather than arabs), In English, when down writting, people often like to use english words for number so here is the difference. Another trick here is in ‘我没有继续’='I didn't continue (to write diary by using chinese)' the word 'continue' here is the spark, it shows the logic link with your previous ideas so that there is no need to state out an object. for note 2: you were trying to say: I find it very hard to write grammatically correct sentences. So the logic in chinese here will be: 'i ' 'felt' 'grammer' (is) 'hard' (for me) = '我 觉得 语法 很难。' (And grammer is 语法,the word you used there '法语' means 'French (language)' as France=法国, therefor French=法语 and Frenchmen=法国人) for note 3: You've nailed it, great job there! 🐧 As for the living theatre, well it is depends on the drama that you took, I'm not really a theatre fan so, I can't give u much advise here. In reality however, I am a male and I can't really relate to the situation you drew there as the man pushes the woman to do what she doesn't want or doesn't like. I perfer do things myself not rely on anyone else, so the situation in that show there, I cannot relate myself in such circumstances. Lastly, you are learning, that's a good thing! no need to say sorry about it, you're improving yourself!
  39. 1 point
    @Lu, I am glad you mentioned books overstating their 字数. This is something I have noticed and wondered about. Why exaggerate the number of characters a book contains? My preferred method for counting Chinese characters is CTA. It tells me exactly how many characters a given text has. BTW, punctuation, whitespace, and English words do not count toward my 1,000,000-character goal. That would be cheating.
  40. 1 point
    You are right, it’s an ox. I was confused by the pairing of 大牛伯 and 小牛. (There’s a father-son dynamic between the farmer and his ox in the text.)
  41. 1 point
    Good question. 13,124 is the total number of characters of the works I completed in 2019. That number would be a lot higher if I included works in progress.
  42. 1 point
    The tagline at the bottom is fairly saucy too with the 泡. Perhaps time to open a Japanese eatery called O Tempura O Mores.
  43. 1 point
    a fun story behind these orange, check this name 褚时健.
  44. 1 point
    澜沧客运站 An internet search does indeed suggest somewhere quite out-of-the way... perhaps you went there for a nice cup of tea 😉
  45. 1 point
    My two penn'orth: Squatting over the hole-in-the-ground type is practically always going to be more sanitary than sitting directly on a sit-down type (other than a brand new one) provided the area the squatter comes into contact with has not been soiled by previous users. If the area the squatter comes into contact with when using a hole-in-the-ground type is already soiled then clearly squatting on a sh*t- and p*ss-free floor over a sit-down type is the more sanitary option, even if the bowl and/or rim is soiled, as long as no contact is made with the bowl/rim. Given the shorter distance to the target, performing seated as intended on a sit-down type is the approach most likely to deposit your waste in the right place with no overspill and leave the surrounding floor clean for the next user. However, unless before you perform you first clean the seat thoroughly or cover it with paper, the close contact required between intimate parts of your flesh and a seat that has very probably already been pressed close by the least sanitary parts (generally speaking) of thousands of other people means you will inevitably be coming into closer contact with other people's pathogens than you would if squatting, other things being equal. Have I left something out, or are we dung with this topic?
  46. 1 point
    Wow! I'm in awe of people who can do simultaneous interpreting... and 8 hrs a day for a week sounds incredibly intense. Thanks for the detailed write-up, very interesting and I'm sure useful to those considering a similar path.
  47. 1 point
    This is a place where your imagination should take flight.
  48. 1 point
    Could you put in an application for an honours year in Chinese for an Australian university? It won't take you much time, cost you any money or necessitate your travel to Australia. You have two years to consider it!
  49. 1 point
  50. 1 point
    Thanks @Shelley, I'm on the case!
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