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Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/23/2020 in Blog Comments

  1. Very interesting picture! It's a reference to the song “学猫叫” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OHbwkZgkBIU). It has a certain "childish" style to it, but I've been told it's directed towards adults.
    3 points
  2. I would agree with everything @7800 said, however I wouldn't take that as a negative. Some parts of the HSK are not well designed for ensuring you know the material, but if you passed then you passed. It's more an indication of the actual value that being an "HSK2 level student" has. But you're not going to stop here, are you? I have studied in a language school in Shanghai, where people are taking 3 hours of classes per day, 5 days per week, and are immersed. It still takes most students ~6-8 weeks to achieve HSK2 level. @tsitsi has achieved this in 5 weeks doing self study in their own country. That is a fantastic achievement! All you have to do is not stop. If you keep up even 60% of this pace for the rest of the year, there is no reason you won't be able to get a passing grade on an HSK 5 test on day 365. At HSK 5 you will be able to watch TV shows and understand the general plot, or work on reading through novels as a form of study instead of having to rely on textbooks. There is loads you can do that is enjoyable to help you study, and at this pace you're going to get there in no time! The higher up the HSK examination scale you go, the harder they are to fake your way through (although I will admit this maybe doesn't apply for every question in the tests), and an HSK 3 student is definitely more capable than an HSK 2 student who is more capable than an HSK 1 student. Congratulations, @tsitsi. You should be very proud of yourself, and I will look out for your blog post with your grades to congratulate you again.
    2 points
  3. I think you've achieved quite a lot, but I'd like to bring your attention to the fact that the HSK is very badly designed. Even if you only know around 40% of what's being tested, you can get a passing grade, and that means very little. There are too many questions in which you have a 50% chance of being right even if you don't read them, some questions can be solved simply by excluding possibilities, some questions have answers that make no sense at all, and some questions only require you to accurately listen to a single key word. In my opinion, for the first 4 levels, if you're not fully comfortable with the test, if you're not understanding almost all of it, and your grade isn't above 90% of the max, then it probably means you should still invest some more time studying the language at that level, and not go to the next one. You seem to be doing great, but don't let the HSK fool you, be sure to master the basics before going on.
    2 points
  4. Are you saying you were able to pass an HSK1 mock test with just 20 hours total of learning chinese?
    2 points
  5. I think you underestimate yourself - you'd definitely do the same in Chinese based on context and/or a list with compounds ending 纪 or 代 (plus with a lot of these kinds of scientific terms coming in from the English-led scientific community, many loans are easy to guess on the spot with context - one that comes to mind is something like 伽马 which came up the other week in some reading). That link wasn't from me, but I have seen his website before. I can't help but think it somehow grossly under-represents the actual situation from experience. 3500+ characters would seem like the threshold moment from many including myself here on CF, and even then that would seem more like a 98% comprehension rate (that number is entirely based on subjective feeling on my part). As for the word list, I'm still wondering how, with "9,786,524,890 1-grams across a total of 94,933 books" analysed, words like 洗脑 and 南辕北辙 turn up in the least frequent list...am I missing something here? From experience, I would say rough, round figures below would set you up well for professional Chinese competency: 20-25,000 common words 5-10,000 specialist field words 4-5000 characters Of course, thats all very well when we really have no way of knowing how much we know or how to even properly count, but its always nice to have a rough idea! Thanks for the encouragement, good luck with your goals too!
    1 point
  6. It really makes me wonder--how many words will be "enough" words? Or when will I stop consulting with a dictionary so regularly? In my own native language, I rarely ever look up words. I usually just ignore them, have a vague sense of what they might mean, etc., and I continue on, undeterred. Sometimes, they fit into broad categories. When I look at a list of words like, "Jurassic, Triassic, Devonian, Cambrian, Paleozoic, Cenozoic, Silurian," etc., I just say to myself, "Oh, those are geologic ages." I don't know much beyond that, but that's fine. Or "captain, corporal, general, lieutenant, colonel, sergeant, private, chief petty officer," etc. I really don't know all the details of each ranking, but I know that they are military rankings, after all, and that's enough for me. Same with "ruby, topaz, amethyst, carnelian, onyx, sapphire, agate," etc. Okay, I don't know the specific details, but I do know that those are kinds of precious stones. There's a sort of odd psychological effect that takes place when I learn Chinese--I feel compelled to learn all the words, probably even beyond what a native Chinese person would do. Even my Chinese friend says, "Oh, I don't know what that word means either. I just know it's a kind of stone" (i.e., like the example above). I'm in "study" mode, and if I fail to recognize any given word (even a word that many Chinese people don't know), I count it as a gap in my knowledge and feel like I have to actively learn it. I wish I could remember who, but somebody on this site (maybe even you--I'm not sure) left this wonderful link, which I have saved in my favorites: https://puroh.it/how-many-chinese-characters-and-words-are-in-use/ This person lays out his method of counting, and he comes up with a total vocabulary size of a little more than 26,000 words, with about 21,000 words getting you to 99.9% comprehension (if there are 500 words on the average page of a book, I suppose that adds up to 1 unknown word on every 2 pages). I wish you the best on your professional goals. 加油!
    1 point
  7. As stated on day 1, this is an HSK challenge and an HSK challenge only, nothing more nothing less. I learn with challenges and this works for me, it won't work for others, I have no interest in learning a language forever and not getting something from it, this is just my way to start a kick start, if you will. And I'm very happy with and proud of my progress. And we are all different, I already have 3 languages under my belt and a few others I've started so not stressed about the different testing systems, at the end of the day if I am able to read, watch, listen, speak and communicate then I'm good. Am I there yet? No but I will be :)
    1 point
  8. Very impressive. If you are able to do HSK 1 already, you should have no problem passing HSK2 by June. After all, HSK2 is the same amount of new vocabulary as HSK1, just 150 more. So maybe you will be able to pass HSK2 after just another 20 hours of studies. Keep up the good work. Looking forward to seeing how you progress in a week or two.
    1 point
  9. Yes, it's very simple especially the first 25 questions, those barely need thinking at all if you've gone through the vocab. HSK 1 does not test understanding or grammatical structures, just if you remember words and can hear them...
    1 point
  10. So at least from one aspect of this: 额吉 =ээж= 妈妈* if that helps demystify this slightly. I thought this word was pretty common knowledge? *I see it translated as 妈妈 in my textbook, but other places I see it translated as 母亲 so.... Related note: Didn't everyone hear the song 梦中的额吉 sung by Uudam / 乌达木 a few years back? If not, it can supplement your basic vocab a bit I suppose. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YOkULQKNRHM https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tktIRYo4wls
    1 point
  11. Surprisingly, I actually recognized the reference immediately. Thats my go to karaoke song when I am in China! 😆 Can't say who it is supposed to be directed towards, but I remember it was huge on douyin back in 2018. Practically every other video was some person with fake cat ears lip syncing that song... or maybe I made the algorithm think thats what I wanted every video to be 😅
    1 point
  12. When I started with Clubhouse ~4 weeks ago, there were usually 3 Mandarin learners club sessions going on simultaneously (in the evening, East Coast US Time). However, recently some evenings there have been zero. The above are useful thoughts. I've not yet tried to start a room. The caution about not making people moderators makes sense. Moderators are ultra-powerful. In one session, I was made moderator and in trying to review the profile of a fellow moderator, I accidentally demoted him to a listener (one click did this). I pulled him right back and he was fine with it. (There is no texting function, so I couldn't text him a 对不起)。 Another time, the moderators accidentally disabled hand raising. They wondered why no one would join in the discussion. One recognized me, invited me up & I explained what had happened. They turned it back on. I've not been in a closed room, so I can't speak to that (I didn't realize they existed....) One thing I'll add, if you know a listener is a good talker, I suggest inviting them up. In saying "good talker", I mean some who engages others and listens, yet can also fill the time with conversation as needed.
    1 point
  13. Thanks for your many valuable contributions.
    1 point
  14. Belated congratulations on your 10-year anniversary! Getting closer to my 20th myself, it's strange and funny to have been a part of something for so long. On to the next ten years, with more of that quality posting!
    1 point
  15. Congratulations for your progress, it must have been so very difficult to stick to your studies under the circumstances and you even finished your thesis, good for you!
    1 point
  16. Good to hear from you, hope Cambodia is treating you well!
    1 point
  17. You lost me at “featured” . I posted it again!
    1 point
  18. @matteo I would but it’s a technical limitation of the blog system. I can set up posts to be published ahead of time, but I can’t set up comments to be published ahead of time. I could potentially set up separate posts for answers, but not sure it’s worth the trouble.
    1 point
  19. I'm sorry you lost your teacher. After a year of working together, that is indeed a setback. Hope you are able to find a good replacement. Congratulations on your progress! One small constructive suggestion regarding word choice early on: "我最近很不高兴。。。" 不高兴 = 难过
    1 point
  20. i think if i get to the point where i sound as good as you do, i'd be pretty happy. keep it up! I went back and listened to the old one and (to me) you're definitely better than last time.
    1 point
  21. 1,000,000 characters later, how do you feel about the progress you have made? How has your reading ability improved since you started?
    1 point
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