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Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/16/2018 in Posts

  1. 10 points
    I just wanted to chime in and say good job with the product. The more resources there are the better! I don't understand why there's so much much flak when you're just announcing your product. You've not once said it's the only way to successfully learn Chinese, but it's another method people can use to learn. I've just subscribed to the YouTube channel and really enjoy the videos. It's great to have some good video production for a change. My feedback regarding the product is 1. the price and 2. the need to submit card details to get the free trial. I'd be more than willing to try if there was say a 7 day free trial without needing to submit card details, then it just expired after 7 days. If I was interested, I could then pay for the subscription. Regarding the price, with websites like Lynda.com being just £15 a month which has hundreds of different courses, it tough to spend $30 a month on just a Chinese course. I know there's the biannual option, but personally I don't purchase long subscriptions until I've used the product a while. Nonetheless, keep up the work. Take some of the comments with a pinch of salt, as some people seem to spend much more time criticising studying techniques than actually studying themselves.
  2. 6 points
    春發叔公敬啓者:     本人上月回鄉裏探親時,聞悉秀叔公由馬來西亞回來祖國唐山定居,藉此前去拜訪他老人家,詢問我親叔父亞財在海外生活等情形,得秀叔公詳細傳達。使我熱望之餘,謹煩勞叔公,爲您孫侄女之懇求,多費脣舌相助一是,敬乞叔公收到我的信,將情形轉告我叔父亞財明白,唐山有親女來信尋親望他要懷有唐山叔侄女觀念望他有音信給我,有機會時,要回來唐山省視親人,是天倫之樂也。   今將本人狀況敘述給叔公明白,以便轉述給我財叔父知之,諒他能接納耳。諒深有叔侄女之情。我的名字是炳娣,現年53歲了,我的父親名字是嚴定友,母親黃嬌,生下我姊妹倆。早年父母雙亡(我三歲時失父,九歲時失母),哥哥相繼在民國32年離世,使我成爲孤兒。深蒙水清叔把我撫養育作成人,婚後又遭波折,慘愧之餘,今於1974年婚以寶安坪山碧嶺大屋廖家生活,家有五口,耕田爲生,算是溫暖家庭,但生活不勝以人,三女同人打工,四男現年13歲正當求學,剛考入初中學校,負擔甚大,生活全靠我夫婦倆辛勤勞力維持。是所奉字,容後在敘,此致     順祝 福體安康         愚孫侄女嚴炳娣托         一九八八年十二月三日 回信地址 CHINE 中國廣東寶安坪山碧嶺大屋,嚴炳娣收。 (Trying to do genealogy without the ability to read? That's... tough. Google Translate is trained on modern Chinese corpus, not very good at handling this kind of text.)
  3. 4 points
    Since Publius is too modest, here's a post he prepared earlier. See also another comment he made in the same thread.
  4. 4 points
    I loved this whole reply, and we've agreed with you about every aspect of this from the moment we started making this course. There are some details in your post I think are debatable, but it's not necessary, I just wanted to get this across: We make it extraordinarily clear to people throughout the course that 80% is your foundation and you have a much longer road ahead if you want to approach native fluency. Now, you might say, 'but you don't make this clear in the one-sentece marketing claim.' That's correct, and hence the free trial & 30-day money back guarantee. So far only two people have asked for their money back, and so it's fair to say that the people who didn't ask for their money back weren't under the impression that they would be nearly done after the foundation. I think the reason they stay in the course is that the following is true about pre & post-foundation building: Your State as a Learner with Zero or Little Foundation (non-exhaustive): Everything is fog. Your understanding of pronunciation isn't strong enough to be able to pick out recognizable sounds in your listening material You don't know what characters are, how you might figure out the pronunciation, or even simple components. You don't have a systematic methodology for acquiring a new character You don't know what a Chinese word is, much less how the characters within the word relate to each other You can't read anything, so there's no chance of determining a word through context. Naturally, without characters or words, you have no sense of sentence structure There is virtually no pleasure that can be derived from reading There aren't any situations where you can successfully communicate without relying entirely on body language You've not built up healthy study habits, and thus all momentum must be self-derived Unless you used it before, you are unfamiliar with how to use SRS (most people). Your State as a Learning After you Build your 80% Foundation: There's a lot of light breaking through the fog. You understand the principles of how to pronounce every Mandarin sound, thus increasing the likelihood of recognizing more of the sounds produced in the listening material. You can even start to associate purely auditory input with characters. You know hundreds of components and understand how they can have semantic or phonetic functions, therefore providing a layer of context for most unknown characters. You haven't learned every component, but you've mastered the ones you are most likely to see in a new character (Pareto principle again). You have a methodology for quickly committing a new character to memory. You know how to make an SRS flashcard out of it. The characters learned to construct the top 1000 words are the component characters in another 4000 lower frequency words. Because you have a strong sense of how the characters in compound words related to each other, there's a high probability of being able to understand those 4000 words, especially in context. There is a lot of content you can read, and the resources available for graded material are continually expanding (including the tailored content from MB). As a result, you increase the likelihood of understanding an unknown word through your keen sense of sentence structure combined with your knowledge of components and how words related to each other. Sidenote: @imron This is a refutation of your claim that someone has "no idea" what the remaining unknown 20% of the sentence is. If they know one or more of the characters in the word, some (or all) of the components, or even what part of speech it likely is based on sentence structure, that's far more knowledge than "no idea." I find this to be Chinese's primary 优势 compared to English; there's just so much more context once you have a foundation. To be clear, I'm not saying they will fully understand, but their chances of either getting the gist or entirely understanding the missing parts of the sentence are far higher than they would be in English. Not only can you derive pleasure from reading, but you start to feel how Chinese can change how you think. There are loads of situations where you can successfully communicate. If you don't know how to say something, you have the vocabulary necessary to explain what you mean. "Hey, do you guys sell those big boxes you put in the kitchen to keep things cold?" You can't communicate well in every situation, but getting by in China is far more accessible. You've already built up enough Myelin Sheaths around your neurons associated with the habit of daily study that it's not difficult to continue. The momentum is already gained, just keep going. Thanks so much for taking the time to write such a thoughtful response @imron, and to everyone who has politely engaged in the content of the course and how we're presenting it. I'm going to keep working all day every day on it, and it's never going to be perfect, but I know that it's helping people get through the "everything is fog" phase very effectively.
  5. 4 points
    Platform(s): PC / Mac OS X Where to buy: here System Requirements: OS: Windows 7 64-bit, Processor: Intel Core i3 6100 or AMD FX-4350, Memory: 4 GB RAM, Graphics: NVIDIA Geforce GT 1030, 2GB (Legacy: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 460), AMD RX550, 2GB (Legacy: AMD Radeon HD 6850), Integrated: Intel HD Graphics 630, DirectX: Version 11, Storage: 5 GB available space Release Date: 30 Aug 2018 Languages: English and Chinese (both text and audio), French, Italian, German, Russian, Polish, Spanish (text only) Chinese Level Required: intermediate/upper intermediate Proportion of play time where you'll be using Chinese: High (lots of text-based resource management, plus plenty of audio) Specific/specialised Vocab Learned: Medical This game is a spiritual successor to the popular mid-90s sim Theme Hospital. Your job is to build and maintain hospitals in a variety of challenging environments. It takes a pretty cynical view on private healthcare, and the main aim of the game is to make money rather than cure patients. A game centred around illness could get a little depressing, so the developers have created their own humorous diseases and cures. You'll be dealing with illnesses such as Freddie Mercury Sickness rather than the common cold: Despite the relatively low system requirements, my laptop still isn't quite up to running it, but a fellow forum member, @markhavemann, has played the game and was kind enough to leave the following review:
  6. 4 points
    "So cool!" "That's amazing!" "Awesome!" "Wow!" And of course, the ever-present "Yeah!" None of these are exactly the same as 好玩, but they're used in the same way to express the same feelings. It's arbitrary. Next topic: Why do Westerners say "Oh my God!" all the time? Is it because they are especially religious? Perhaps this has something to do with the Reformation?
  7. 4 points
    Thanks for all of this! (a lot of these are very familiar now that you're all mentioning them, it's been a long 19 years running Pleco...) Anybody remember any early China-based websites? I don't really recall there being any when I first went to China in 1999; everybody had PowerWord (and that seemed like absolute magic at the time, plus Kingsoft had the brilliant idea of charging like 20 or 30 RMB for the thing so people would actually buy a legitimate version), and in any event CDs were cheap enough and internet data was expensive enough that I have a hard time imagining anybody would have used an online dictionary when an offline one was available. But I have to think that there were at least a few. Regarding old electronic dictionaries, all my research so far suggests that the Sharp Zaurus does deserve credit as the very first electronic dictionary with touchscreen kanji/hanzi input; specifically the ZI-3000, which debuted in the fall of 1993. (it doesn't seem like the dedicated e-dictionary makers had that until several years later, though certainly by '99 you could go to a shop in Zhongguancun and find a bunch of them) Though if you're willing to count the 2.8-pound Sony PalmTop as an 'electronic dictionary', then the PTC-500 which debuted in 1990 would get that honor. For general-purpose PDAs running Chinese dictionary software, in theory the Psion Series 5 had the hardware to accommodate a handwriting Chinese dictionary in 1997 but I don't believe that anybody ever actually made one. The Palm IIIx shipped in early 1999 and was the first Palm with what I'd view as enough memory (4 MB) to store a Chinese font + dictionary database + handwriting recognizer template file. (and as far as I know the first Palm dictionary viewer app with double-byte character support was Kdic, which Roddy mentions; that was what I used for early Pleco prototypes anyway)
  8. 4 points
    I once said there wasn’t much chance of a nuclear physicist turning up to answer the OP’s question. Five minutes later...
  9. 4 points
    My Chinese isn't amazing but I'm always complimented on my pronunciation, so here's what I do. Shadowing. Watch some videos in YouTube and read up on shadowing. Long story short you basically follow an audio recording and speak along with the recording. It really helps with stressing the right words and when to pause mid-sentence. Most textbooks have CDs to follow the dialogues. Chinesepod is also a good resource for this. Start with short sentences over and over again. Then longer sentences. Finally try short texts. Tone pairs I think that's what it's called. There are some resources online teaching patterns for certain tones together. Pretty helpful to drill and practice. Record. Most importantly, every time you practice what I've mentioned, record it! Just use your phone and make a quick recording, then listen back. You can really hear your mistakes when you record and listen back to yourself. I personally enjoy working hard on my pronunciation. I'm happy to slowly build up my vocabulary but have a solid base when it comes to speaking and my pronunciation. It's an amazing feeling when your taxi/Didi/Uber drives past you, because he didn't expect a foreigner after speaking to you on the phone to book! Perfect practice makes perfect! Just to add: Don't be trapped in thinking you need more/better resources. When I started I was the same and got a tonne of advice on which resources to use, and I got them all. The most important thing is knowing how to best use those resources. You can sign up for the best gym in your city, but you still need to put in the hours, have the discipline and have good knowledge of the equipment to make the most of it and see results.
  10. 3 points
    Here was the relevant post about ping pong: https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/44484-chinese-learning-via-ping-pong/?do=findComment&comment=332679 Those new friends I spoke of five years ago are still with me, and we're still playing ping pong too. (No, I never said that rummy is *better* than mahjong. I just suggested that we try it, taught them, and they became addicted. 👍) And, here's some ping pong vocabulary: https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/10990-ping-pong-vocabulary-乒乓球词汇/?do=findComment&comment=84637
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