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  2. No you can't use the Huayu Scholarship for 1 to 1 tuition. It has to go to a 'recognised mandarin training centre' as far as I recall. I may try and get it for next Summer and to a sabbatical so I might see you there! You can get it for 1 year, 9 months 6 months 3 months or 2 months. Whilst in China I basically always had a tutor so I was tutored for like five years on and off whilst working and whilst taking time just to study between jobs.
  3. Southwind Please what is your application status in SWJTU
  4. I haven't looked into the scholarship yet @thechamp but I'll do so for next year. Thanks for the tip! Can you use the Huayu for private tutoring? How long did you take private classes for? The main issue I have is trying to remember simplified characters while learning traditional ones. It's difficult to do that on my own, so I thought I would try classes, and everyone seems to recommend NTNU.
  5. I just moved to China a few weeks ago, and this is my last week to apply for my resident permit, before I came here I've applied to learn Chinese at Nanjing University. I explained to them that I was going in a spouse visa and asked if I'd have to change it for a student visa and the answer was no, I don't have to do it. But now my husband works place is saying that I have to do my residence permit with the University, and change my Visa. I really can't do the course with the s1 visa? Also, I don't think I'll have enough time to do the whole process with the school now, since they never told me anything. I am afraid that I'll have to wait until next semester to apply again...
  6. I moved the discussion of registration at an AirBnB to a new thread, because it is an interesting topic that deserves its own thread. Feel free to continue that discussion here.
  7. Can you please share the link for the results
  8. I didn't actually end up studying there in the end. I just went to a town in the South (much cheaper) and hired a tutor. I genuinely think 1-to-1 tutoring is more effective than a class session. I think the reason to go to university is so you can get a scholarship. Have you looked into the Huayu Enrichment Scholarship?
  9. Hi, has anyone received the documents (JW201 & Admission letter) from EU window yet? Could someone once more share the QR code for the WeChat group, thanks.
  10. Thanks for your response @thechamp Do you remember what score you got? How long did you end up studying there? Did your time there significantly improve your Chinese?
  11. Back in the day I took their test and got put in the top class (and to be honest I have friends who are much better than me at Chinese). At that time I had been living and working in China for four years and had been working in a Chinese office speaking/reading Chinese all day for the best part of a year. I also had an HSK5 but as many will tell you - that is not that high a level of Chinese. I think people who are at the very high levels of Chinese learning just don't bother with a classroom environment - they just read books and hire a personal tutor.
  12. Hi everyone, I'll be attending the Mandarin Training Center at National Taiwan Normal University this fall, and was wondering how the placement test is used to place students in different classes. What are the thresholds? I'd be grateful to hear placement test scores form people who attended NTNU and what classes they were ultimately put in. Thank you!
  13. vellocet

    Pronouncing the name Hsieh

    Once, when I had first started to understand Chinese, I overheard two employees talking about Cantonese people. One of them mocked the way Cantonese sounded, and she made those exact "Ching chong wing wong" sounds. They both laughed and I joined in, thrilled to at last have gotten the joke and be able to laugh with everyone when Chinese was being spoken. A golden moment in my Chinese study.
  14. And often the versions online date back to when OCR errors were even more common.
  15. I did both of these courses a couple years back and really enjoyed them both. Slingerland is a very engaging instructor (if a little gimmicky/show-offy at times) and seems to know his stuff. I've done a few online courses and this is probably one of the best ones. I'd definitely recommend it for anyone interested in ancient Chinese thought, moral psychology and ethics. If September wasn't the start of a new school year I'd consider taking this course again.
  16. Publius

    Pronouncing the name Hsieh

    The problem with Wade-Giles is that everyone except sinologists will just ignore the apostrophe and superscript. For example, a Han dynasty physician 張仲景 would be spelled Chang¹ Chung⁴-ching³ in Wade-Giles. That's hardly distinguishable from 常重慶 , Ch'ang² Ch'ung²-ch'ing⁴. To ordinary people, they are just the same Chang Chung-ching. Note also that Wade-Giles uses the same spelling for the initial consonants in 張 and 景, relying on the readers to know the difference (/tɕ/ when followed by /i/ or /y/, /ʈʂ/ otherwise). It's fair to say, in my opinion, that Wade-Giles helped perpetuate the Ching Chong Chang stereotype. Therefore I think it's a great improvement that Hanyu Pinyin should make use of 25 of the 26 Roman letters. Zhāng Zhòngjǐng vs Cháng Chóngqìng seems quite clear and elegant to me. Admittedly some of the usages are weird, notably the letters j, q, x and c. But let's face it, Pinyin was not designed with foreign learners in mind. Who cares whether they are pronounceable in English (Eyjafjallajökull, anyone?). The sounds they represent are difficult and need to be taught separately anyway.
  17. imron

    Word statistics for Chinese Books

    In answer to your other question: You mentioned in your other book that this your 5th novel? At this stage, I'd still opt for 'easier to read'. It took me maybe 8-9 books before really being comfortable reading books in Chinese. Keeping things easy allows you to consolidate your other non-vocab reading skills, and as you mentioned give you that positive boost that comes from feeling that you are reading Chinese! I'd also opt for original Chinese works over translations. With translated works you'll have a lot more words and transliterations that aren't common in Chinese and that are potentially difficult to look up translations for. Finally, I'd recommend against《狼图腾》at this point in time (you can always come back to it several books down the line). The book starts out well, but loses the plot about halfway through it and you might be hard-pressed to maintain interest (I was). That just adds to the difficulty when you are still trying to get in to the groove of reading Chinese novels. What are the other books you've read?
  18. where did you see the first batch? Kindly share the link
  19. Am from Kenya University is southwest jiaotong University.
  20. DavyJonesLocker

    Word statistics for Chinese Books

    thanks dude👍
  21. imron

    Word statistics for Chinese Books

    There has been some recent discussion on what makes a good metric of 'difficulty' in the Chinese Text Analyser thread.
  22. Longfellow

    Chinese Made Easier mp3?

    Martin, I'm so glad that you checked in! Chinese Made Easier was my choice of textbooks when it was time to start learning Chinese again & it served very well. I've shifted over to electronic resources but am still holding CME in reserve. It's good to know that the audio & supplements are still on the website & that some of your pronunciation tips are now on Youtube. Thanks again for your work on the books & making these resources available.
  23. @Southwind Hello.I would like to know which countries include in result?
  24. DavyJonesLocker

    Word statistics for Chinese Books

    However number of unknown words does not necessarily equate to difficulty level. For me, sentence complexity structure, grammar, abstractness of writing is much more of an important factor than number of unknown words, Mind you it's a good starting point. I suppose. I think reading with a tablet and Pleco its far easier to tackle book with a high number of unknown words as one can read with minimal breaks . However one needs to resist the temptation if checking the dictionary before you given yourself a few seconds to recall it. I've scowled myself a few times for immediately checking a word only to realise it's in HSK3! I know many like to voice the merits of reading at the 90% , 95% level (or whatever the optimal point is) but it's too theoretical to be of much use I'm my view . You could well have a vocab of 5000 words and yet face many unknown words from a 2500 word graded reader. Personally I think the best way it's to find a book that you are interested it , have at crack at the first ten or twenty pages and then you will have a good feel as to whether it will be for you or not. On my forth book now , after 3 attempted failures (either too difficult or simply not interested). My ultimate driver in persistence of reading is "interest". Interest can trump difficulty level (however we wish to define it) by a large margin imo. Many books are recommended on line for Chinese learners but it may well have no interest for you personally, hence its an important consideration. When selecting a book I ask myself now "would I read this if it were in English" .
  25. Yes. Yes, because many (most) electronic versions are just automatic OCR scans, and while OCR tech is pretty good, it's not 100%.
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