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    Since 2003, Chinese-forums.com has been helping people learn Chinese faster and get to China sooner. Our members can recommend beginner textbooks, help you out with obscure classical vocabulary, and tell you where to get the best street food in Xi'an. And we're friendly about it too. 

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  • Latest Topics

    • Takeshi
      1
      So apparently the old Guangzhou Shenzhen line is accepting Quickpass payment. (http://m.xinhuanet.com/gd/2018-05/19/c_1122855475.htm)   Sounds pretty cool.   Anyone try this? Can foreigners use it? How do you setup Quickpass on a phone? (I assume it's safer than just using the plain card.)
    • Bibu
      0
      Anyone would like to join me to make videos ? this video is for Mandarin learners, supposed to be a weekly video , introduce 1 or 2 hot mandarin words/phrases that surfaces in recent weeks.   Partners would be doing planning, shooting video(a good mobile phone or webcam is must to have), post-production of the clips.   Here is a very draft version you can check of, and leave your message if like to join , only comment is welcome either.   https://youtu.be/QcGs-9WpqN4
    • Dien Le
      8
      I know how important of Chinese stroke order so I always find out the source to find the correct character stroke orders. In the beginning, everything is going well and I am really satisfied with the guides of stroke orders from Wikipedia or some Mobile applications. But recently, I found out that there are a few Chinese characters which do not only have a only one stroke order. For example: the character 出 /chu/ could have two stroke orders: 1) At Wikipedia: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%E5%87%BA#/media/File:%E5%87%BA-order.gif 2) At zdict.net: https://pic.zdic.net/kai/jt_bh/gif/15/51FA.gif It is kind of disappointed to me. This issue is not only existing on the websites or Mobile applications, I am practicing writing Chinese and the 汉语教程 of Beijing university also showing inconsistent some stroke orders of some characters. Any suggestion about the trusted sources for learning Chinese stroke order from everyone? Really appreciated!   The problem here is that I am learning Chinese from a very trusted lecture from Beijing University, but it seem the stroke order there is wrong! So I am a bit a disappointed.
    • Tomsima
      3
      Im looking for a good word processor like ms word, but is specifically designed for typing articles in vertical text, top-to-bottom, right-to-left. I currently use WPS and it works fine for almost everything chinese-character related, but I cannot find a way for it to let me type a portrait layout vertical text document. (landscape is fine, but just not what Im looking for). I'm specifically looking to type up a newspaper article in a more traditional vertical layout.   Was wondering if there is anything better out there; I have seen there is some good looking Japanese text editing software out there in pictures etc, but have no idea where to go to find it. What do others here use? Would appreciate any recommendations.     
    • Nita
      5
      I'm just start to learn Chinese and I have a problem with using hanzi. For example 囚 means prisoner, and 囚犯 also means prisoner.... What are the difference. When I suppose to use one hanzi and when two? I know that for you it's a basic knowledge but I can't find answer anywhere...  If anyone could help me I will be very grateful.
    • oof
      4
      This feels like a dumb question, but I couldn't really find any information online about it. Although both my parents are Chinese, I grew up in America - please forgive my ignorance of Chinese culture.    I'll be touring a couple cities in the near future. Since the last time I was in China, I began wearing silver rings; in particular, I have a horned skull ring that I really like wearing. The "censoring" of skeletons in video games and general taboo around symbols of death made me curious if these rules extended to fashion as well. Additionally, after browsing some Chinese streetwear/fashion, I noticed that little to no men wore rings (n<30 though, very small sample size). I don't mind being judged, but will wearing my rings draw any unwanted trouble?   Thank you!
    • chrm
      0
      I've graduated in the year 2016 may and I have 2 years of work experience , but my graduduation certificate was issued in the year 2017 june, and only issue date is mentioned on the certificate。 will this be a problem? I do have my last semister grade card showing 2016 may。 Do they verify the work experience letter issued from foreign countries during application or the attested doccument would suffice?
    • mungouk
      2
      Hi all,   I did the “Internet-based test” for HSK 3 today at the Mandarin House office near People’s Square in Shanghai (where I’m on holiday).   I'll report on it below since there seems to be some variation in what people are experiencing with this. Also they don't give any proper instructions in advance if you're doing the computer-based test — although my admission ticket said "Internet-based test" on it, it still had all the usual stuff in Chinese only about bringing 2B pencils and an eraser.   The format of the test on-screen was very similar to the online mock test described in another thread, but not exactly identical.  I’m not sure if these computer-based tests are exactly the same in every test centre, or if they’re administered the same… from what I’ve read online it seems probably not.   Today there were about 10 of us in a small 16-seater computer lab, each sat at a small office cubicle with a Windows PC and headphones. We were told to arrive 30 mins before the test start time. The admin guy told us to choose any seat, then we logged in with our candidate number and a 4-digit password he gave to each of us individually.  There was an initial screen playing some music giving you a chance to adjust the volume level. Then we sat there for about 20 mins waiting for the test to start, with an on-screen clock counting down. There were a couple of pages of instructions ("Notice" button) to read telling you what to expect, and an "Examinee" button to check your personal details are correct.       Instructions (click images to enlarge):       There is time to read questions before they come up — in fact when the countdown gets to 1 minute the system takes you into the test and there is then 1 minute before the test actually starts when you can have a look at the listening section. After answering each question you can skip to the next one (or further forward) to have more time to read the potential answers, but only within the section. This ended up being pretty crucial, given the relative difficulty of reading small, pixelated hanzi.  Someone mentioned in another thread that they found the Hanzi hard to read in low resolution and a poor quality font.  This is probably worth practicing (somehow).   Another disadvantage relative to the paper-based test is that the questions/pictures and potential answers didn’t all fit on the screen at the same time, so I had to keep scrolling up and down when matching questions with answers.  (Maybe some centres with bigger/hi-res screens don’t have this problem?)   Again as mentioned elsewhere, you can navigate back and forth within each of the 3 sections, but you can’t move onto the next section until the time is up for the previous one. Also once a section is completed it is locked and you can't go back to review or change anything.   When the listening section is finished there’s an enforced break of 6 minutes before section 2 can start, which would be when people doing the paper test are copying their answers to the computer-marked sheet.  The only useful thing I could think to do at this point was go back and check that I’d answered all of the questions. As someone mentioned in another thread I think (or maybe it was this blog), a pen icon appears next to each question in the table of contents on the left of the screen, to show it’s been answered.    For the first 5 questions of the “writing” section you have to drag-and-drop tiles with hanzi on them in order to make a grammatically correct sentence. I didn’t think it was obvious that you have to drag them onto the line below to specify the order, rather than just re-arranging them. When you do this, another copy of the sentence appears below just in the Hanzi with no tiles showing. I think this is the same as the mock online test. Not a great design IMHO — it may be that some people don't realise and effectively don't answer the question, and these are worth 10 marks each.   The input method in my test centre was sogou as mentioned in another thread, although you only need to use it for the last 5 questions. This makes them super-easy, since you only have to enter the missing character that’s shown in pinyin, and you type in pinyin anyway. Especially in the case of one question, which began “(  )务员, …?” — I couldn’t remember what the 服 character looks like, but since 服务员 is a word I just typed the pinyin and Sogou completed it for me, so I could check it was right.    For the last section I did these last 5 questions first, which meant I had plenty of time to answer the first 5, rearranging the tiles. I found that 15 minutes to do these final 10 questions is more than required, and in fact most people started leaving with about 3-5 minutes still to go.    As per the instructions, there's a "submit" button at the top of the screen which you press when you're finished. Once you've done this there's a warning that you can't go back and change anything, which you need to accept.     Preparation — reflections   I did HSK 2 six months ago and I think I probably prepared more for that, at least in terms of doing mock tests. This time around I only did 3 mock tests in the past week (plus the online one 2-3 months back, which I failed), as I’d been spending most of the last couple of weeks with my teacher preparing for HSKK, since it would be my first HSKK test and I was less sure of what to expect.  When I did HSK 2, I did 5 mock tests in the weeks leading up to the test.  Then again, HSK 2 takes much less time to complete, so they’re easier to fit into a busy schedule.     I did drill vocabulary a lot more this time though, given that you need twice as much when you move up a level.   I felt that the actual test today was more difficult than the mock tests I’d done.   On reflection I think my preparation should have focused more on the reading section, using more mock tests to practice answering all 30 questions in 30 minutes — time is very tight, and it would seem useful to develop some tactics for dealing with these questions.     For example, in some of the longer questions where they’re asking you things like “what, in general, is this passage about?”, these can be answered by scanning/skimming the text rather than reading the whole thing, which there really isn’t time to do unless you’re a very fast reader.  In the later mock tests, for the longer texts, I adopted the tactic of first reading the question after the text, then the 3 potential answers, and then deciding how to answer it based on the type of text.    If anyone has any tips or tactics for this or other sections please share!   Hope this is useful. Now to get on with my holiday — off to Suzhou tomorrow.        
    • Prince N. Wonnawon
      0
      Hello Everyone, My name is Prince N. Wonnawon, I hold a BA Degree in Political Science and Public Administration minor, from the United Methodist University on Ashmun Street, Liberia in 2011. I am pleased to inform you all officially that after frantic efforts in search of online scholarships and opportunities, I was fortunate to have been awarded a master scholarship Type D (covering tuition waiver and health insurance) in Public Administration at the Shanghai Jiao Tong University, in Shanghai, China, where I will be studying Public Administration with emphasis in Public Policy and Administrative Reform for academic year 2018/2020 (Sept. 2018 to July 2020). As part of the process, I am schedule to do my Accommodation Reservation: 9:00 am to 12:00, July 18th, 2018 (Beijing Time+8).   In view of the above, I am kindly asking any male who would love to be in a Double Room or Share Room to contact me. Additionally, I want to know if the reservation is done per semester or per year. Best, Prince.
    • Juliedang
      4
      Hi all! My name is Julie and I am new to the forum. I really like Chinese and I've just started attending a Chinese class. My purpose is to communicate with Chinese people and watch dramas or movies without subtitles. Hence, do you think that I need to practice writing letters? 
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