Learn Chinese in China
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    • Bar
      0
      Hello i need a translate of a chinis name for 2 mainly thing. 1: tatto. 2: for a bussnis card to show in china.   First name is: Bar the mining is this: The name Bar is a nickname for something that grew in nature and is characterized by traits of wildness, strength, courage and heroism. The name foreshadows the exit from fixed frames, walking on an independent path, and the ability to create an interesting and extraordinary life.   And the Famly name is : Sherer it dose not have a mining so i cant explain what is the mining of this. i see that is help to add the birthday so its 17-09-1990. the year of the hours i think   and also if you can help me get my father a name also for bussnis card it will help alot =] his first name is: Shlomo that mining is : Symbolizes infinite wisdom, talent, leadership ability, righteousness and unswerving loyalty to the light and its teachings. the last name is the same as mine. and i dont know the date now if nesasry i will ask.   hope you can help me pliz
    • Matthewkell
      32
      I'm talking in particular about things like the use of 外国人 as an all encompassing, homogenous group. When I first came to China I found the naivety of it amusing and proudly adopted the title of "外国人," but as time has gone by the use of 外国人, in particular blanket statements about all foreigners, (e.g. 外国人都很开放 and so on) has started to get on my nerves a little bit, and given China's increasingly aggressive and unreasonable stance in international politics I no longer find the naivety of it quite so charming.  Do you think it is best to just 入乡随俗 and accept it for the sake of getting along with people? Or do you think we have a responsibility to encourage the development of a more international outlook within China? Generalisations about foreigners as one group are so common that it is not realistic to consistently challenge them, and the sinocentric worldview is so deeply rooted it can actually take quite a long time to explain what is wrong with talking about "foreigners" as a unified group. So I usually just roll with it but explain to closer Chinese friends why I don't like it and why it is absurd to expect me to be representative of not just my country but of people from places as diverse as the USA, Brazil, Congo, India, North Korea, Saudi Arabia, Myanmar, all of which are "foreigners." What are other people's thoughts on this?
    • Matthewkell
      10
      Just a minor question which has been bugging me slightly - I've noticed that Chinese people like to use the English words "cheap" and "low" a lot, for example they will be speaking entirely in Chinese but add the word "cheap" in English, or "cheap girl". By spending way too much time baiduing random questions to see what Chinese discussion forums are saying about various topics, I've found that in particular there seems to be a belief that foreigners view Chinese girls as "cheap girls."  I'm curious about the origin of this "low" and "cheap" thing, because it really isn't something we say that commonly in English in that context. (i.e. basically calling someone a slut) So where does it come from? What makes me particularly curious about it is that the top result for "cheap girl" on sogou is the answer to a question about what it means saying "额,cheap girl是老外对中国女人的称呼啊,就是说白送的,玩玩就可以丢掉那种。" Trawling through related discussions, it appears that this is quite a common belief that foreigners describe Chinese girls as "cheap," and I guess that this is the reason for using "cheap" and "low" as Chinglishisms. But this just isn't true, and at least in liberal western countries with a fairly strong belief in gender equality it is horribly outdated, and even socially unacceptable, to talk about girls in terms of monetary value. The thought of me saying to a male friend "yeah, she's a pretty cheap girl" even makes me feel some revulsion, which I guess is why it is bugging me so much. So where does it come from? Most chinglishisms have an identifiable origin, (e.g. "pk" being used for "competition" apparently comes from an abbreviation of "player kill" in some video game.) Was the "cheap, low" thing some blog post which went viral? Was it used on a TV show or something? Does anyone have any theories?  
    • LaoDing
      0
      OK, so I've been teaching ESL in Japan and China for about a million years now (literally) and have never have had the need for a 'TEFL certificate.' I've put another million hours into pedagogy and classroom practice, so I can't imagine it being that hard.  Now suddenly I need one and the only way I can get one is online. I want one that is cheap, accredited, and will work in Guangzhou (I've already taught there for two years without a 'TEFL certificate' and my FAO is asking me how 'I got away with it!'  Anyway, does anyone know if this company, sorry, 'school,' is OK? They have three 'campuses' in China though I'd be doing a 120 hour online, all for 220 USD. Anything faster? Just as good? I don't care about putting it in my resume, I just want the rubber stamp. Sorry if I sound cynical- If you've been teaching EFL for over 25 years you might feel it's rather ridiculous too. Here's the school: ITTT https://www.teflcourse.net/
    • iekkim
      4
      I've realized how it could help me learn Mandarin faster if I listened to podcasts. I don't have Chinese radio stations readily available and my only source of Chinese music is whatever is on Spotify.    I've just Downloaded Pocket Cast and subscribed to Learn Mandarin. I haven't gotten around to listening to it but will do so as soon as I am on my way home from work. If there are other podcasts that you like and listen to (especially ones that are easy for the beginners like me), please suggest some. It would also be much better if they're available on Pocket Cast so I at least get my money's worth.   Thanks in advance!
    • azoe
      0
      Hi all, I'm Zoe. I am an Irish student who will be doing a year abroad in Shanghai from September.   I'm currently filling out my application forms, and I'm stuck on my own name! I don't have a Chinese name worked out yet.   I've spoken to a few Chinese exchange students at my college who had some suggestions. I've chosen 马 as my surname, but I'm having trouble with "Zoe". Their suggestion was 祖儿, but an online friend of mine from Shanghai told me this is a bit weird, seeing as it's the name of a singer.   Her suggestion for me was 卓义, or 卓亦 "if that feels too masculine". (I have no idea what's masculine and what isn't so I really don't know the difference here.)   I would love some more opinions: would 卓义 or 卓亦 work? With that "zh" sound, do they sound too much like Joey? I really kind of wanted a "z" sound, as Joey has no connection to my name. I'd be very grateful for any help with this!        
    • winterpromise31
      26
      What does 我真想抽你 mean? I "know" each word in the sentence but it must be an idiom or colloquialism because I don't understand the meaning. Thank you! 
    • 889
      4
        You know the problem on a phone: you pause the video to take a longer gander at the caption, and the navigation bar immediately pops up, blocking the caption.   Can anyone suggest an Android video player that keeps the navigation bar below the video image when paused?
    • Enrico035
      1
      Hello friends,  I am an Italian student and I will apply soon for a semester (from march 2018 to juy 2018) in Zhejiang University of Hangzhou. I have some problems with the web page of the University and I cannot find the available courses offered by Zheda. Someone studying there can help me? I am studying philosophy so the best would be to find someone who study in the faculty of Human Studies, but I will be glad for every help. (I can offer free Italian,French or Spanish skype lessons in return  ) Thank you, Enrico   
    • mlescano
      2
      There's a 2014 MIT research paper that demonstrated the advantage of "smart subtitles" (pop-up translations) for Chinese language acquisition. I never found the MIT-created software, but I did found something similar: The free, open source Lingo Player.   It serves a similar purpose as LAMP (Lingual Media Player), mentioned in this thread, but Lingo Player has less features: It's only focused on being a video player with pop-up translation for always-on subtitles. The good thing is that, while LAMP seems to have stopped development years ago, Lingo Player is fairly new, so it might have a better future. The big disadvantage is that it's Windows-only.   You do need to have VLC installed, as Lingo Player uses it to be able to decode the video. Get Lingo Player from here: http://oaprograms.github.io/lingo-player/   Once you open it, it will ask your native language and the language you're learning, so it can show appropriate translations. You load your Chinese video and your Chinese SRT file and you're good to go.   Using it is dead simple: -Pause either by hovering the mouse over the subtitle area or pressing the spacebar. -Quickly jump to next/previous subtitle line with the left and right arrows. -Hovering over any word shows a popup translation of the whole sentence. I haven't found a way to translate just a single word. I guess this is best for more advanced students. For the rest of us, LAMP is better because you can freely select the portion to be translated.   It does have a "saved words" function, but the lack of documentation makes it... Not so useful.   If someone finds the MIT-developed player, he's my hero.
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