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    • Captain Carling
      3
      Had this tat since 1999 and forgot what it means. Can anyone help me please?
    • xiaojiang216
      0
      Hi everyone,   I remember coming across a blog a few years ago (must have been on WordPress or something) that featured funny mistranslations of "inspirational" Chinese idioms. I can't think of any examples off the top of my head, but one very well could have been something along the lines of:   知足常乐 The feeling when you get to the end of the toilet paper roll   The blog has come up in conversation several times now and I can't think of the name of it, let alone find it via Google using any combination of keywords imaginable. Does this ring a bell to anyone, or have I completely lost my mind?   Many thanks!
    • jessicabd
      4
      Hi. I am working on an illustrating a project that arose from a social research with adult children and their elderly parents. One of my findings was that adult children care for elderly parents physical well-being hence try to get elderly parents to trust science and eat healthier.  As I am trying to illustrate such findings, I was wondering   What kind of food swaps would be a good example? What kind of Chinese foods would be examples of unhealthy food that elderly may like? And what kind of foods would the contemporary Chinese generation of adults consider a healthy alternative?   Thanks for your help :)    
    • 大块头
      5
      One of my favorite things about learning Chinese is encountering colorful 谚语 and 成语. Here is a thread to share amusing proverbs.   过屠门而大嚼   to chew when passing the butcher shop; to feed on illusions
    • Jan Finster
      0
      I wonder how fast your reading speed is (was) when you were around HSK 4 or HSK 5? Also, how many characters would you /could you read per day?   Currently, I am mostly (90%) reading HSK 4 level texts at TheChairMansBao. They are around 175-200 words per article.I go pretty chill and do check emails etc in between. I also listen to each article's audio at least 2-3x (around 3 min clips). According to CTA, on average, I should be familiar with 95% of the words in the texts (= at some point I knew them, but some are of course forgotten).  Still, even if I spend 6 hours per day on them, I barely go beyond 3000 characters per day 😥  
    • thelearninglearner
      15
      I decided to get back into drinking tea after not having any for a long time. I used to buy prince of peace tea back in the states, but haven't been able to find it in China for a reasonable price. (it's twice the price on taobao of what I used to pay for it)    Anybody know any good ginger tea in China? I like really strong ginger flavor. I don't mind adding my own honey.    Or any tea other recommendations? 
    • segminist
      16
      Hello, is this chinese? Can figure it out!   Thanks for any help!
    • Jan Finster
      17
      I have been studying Chinese for close to 1.5 years now, but I still somewhat struggle with numbers, %, dates, etc when I listen to Chinese 😐   If it is one date, it is fine if I concentrate, but when there are lots of numbers, such as 从1.6亿 到 29.4万 and what have you, then I am totally lost... I know my Chinese teacher struggles with English numbers a lot and my Scandinavian mother, who has lived in Germany for 40 years still counts in her head in her primary language. Anyway, I do not have this problem in English at all. Did you guys experience the same?
    • markhavemann
      6
      I'll post this here in case somebody else comes across the same problem.   I bought an e-book at https://www.blcup.com/. Somehow the e-book version was 100rmb but the physical book only costs 30 or something Taobao. But oh well, it's worth it if I can just carry a tablet to class instead of a bunch of heavy books.    After paying for the book I was really annoyed to find out it's in some weird .opz format, and you need to download their own really crappy reader to open it. There is also nothing on the internet about the opz format or converting it to a better format.    Anyway, here's what I figured out:    Rename file to .pdf open with PDF-XChange Editor It will open but say there are errors and ask if you want to save a new, fixed file.  Save it as a fresh PDF that can be read in any application   Unfortunately the text seems to have some weird encoding issues so copying to another application just results in garbage (not so great for quick looking up of characters). I'm trying to figure this out and I'll post the solution if I do.   
    • realmayo
      6
      Pinyin has zhi, chi, shi, ri, but Wade-Giles uses "ih" for the final sound. However for pinyin's zi, ci, si,  Wade-Giles uses something else, "ŭ", as the final.   Normally people seem to talk a lot more about the initial sounds, comparing zh vs z, ch vs c, sh vs s. But how would people describe the change in vowel sounds? Do you notice it? Are you aware of producing a different vowel sound for 是 and 四? Do you/did you ever do so intentionally? Perhaps this is something that is neither much noticed nor actually taught, simply because its impossible not to correctly produce a different final sound if you switch the initial sound.   Wikipedia has a whole page on r-colored vowels. Do you think it's fair to say that the zhi, chi, shi, ri finals are mildly r-coloured, and where Beijing-style (etc) erhua is being used, they are heavily r-coloured? Should I be thinking that actually these are the same vowels, coloured differently?   I started thinking about this just because I heard a Cantonese speaker say 就是说 and I realised that my mouth goes into completely different shapes if I pronounce 就是说 as j/s/s versus j/sh/sh. And those different shapes produce different vowels.
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