Learn Chinese in China
  • Latest Topics

    • rolatis
      0
      I've recently come across these two characters and I have read that they are put in front of a color to turn the color into (light color), like light red for example. I'm just wondering if there is any difference between these two characters for describing light colors (e.g. like in different contexts you would use one character over another), or if these two characters can be used interchangeably.
    • LinYue
      2
      Hello friends, I have come to you looking for advice about what I can do. Next year, I want to apply for a Chinese Government Scholarship, to get a bachelor's degree in a Chinese university. My motivation for doing so is not very common (I think), so I really want to explain that first so you understand where I'm coming from.    I've seen some common objections and advice people have given in this forum to others, so I'll try to address some of them first:   1) The degree isn't worth very much internationally I come from a "third world" country, so I'm pretty sure the same could be said about getting a degree in the best university in the country (where I'm currently enrolled in). I've seen that, in my country, the language knowledge alone is very valuable. Most of the jobs I've gotten have come from being bilingual.    2) The education level isn't very high Again, I've been through 3 semesters in two very different majors in the best university in my country, and my biggest take away has been that if you want to get real knowledge, you're the one that's going to put in the leg work; I've had some really good professors, but for the most part they leave a lot to be desired. The same goes for the people studying with me, most of whom start university at 15/16 and, in the case of the latest major I'm enrolled in, just get in to change majors. Out of 40 people in a class, only two (myself included) actually liked the major! (anthropology). Some didn't even know what it was.    And I think it's important to explain why, if I'm enrolled at the best university in the country at a major that I like, I am looking to study elsewhere. Currently my country is undergoing a crisis. All sectors have been affected, including education. Not only are many of the best professors (and other professionals) leaving the country, but there are frequent riots that means the university closes down, sometimes for months at the time. I started my third semester this year in March/April, and though it's July, I've only had around 4 or 5 classes. combined. And there is one mandatory course that I am not able to take because there are no professors who are giving it. This same thing happened three years ago, and it meant a full year of college was lost.    Now, I'm 24 years old and though my country has different ideas than the US regarding when kids should leave they're parent's house, I still feel like an economical burden on my family. I have a job that pays well, but not well enough, and not stable enough to help them in the face of this crisis. I want to help them and my country, but I need a bachelor's degree, and the I feel deep uncertainty over the ability to even get that in the current situation.    And I love China and the Chinese language! I went to China two years ago, and stayed there for three weeks. I also got the chance to meet a lot of Chinese people working as an English teacher, and they were so warm and wonderful. Cultures and languages fascinate me, so I am really excited to explore an entirely different one.    Here is the part that I need advice in:  I love my current major, anthropology, but anticipate it might be really difficult to study it after 2 years of Chinese language study (1 year self-studying, and 1 year in the CSC language program). I'm fully confident of my language abilities, but it's hard to know what to expect. So yesterday I thought about perhaps doing a Bachelors on something language-oriented instead, Chinese Language, or a Chinese Language and Culture degree. I'd like to ask your opinions! Should I just jump in the deep end with the Anthropology degree? Would a Chinese Language/Language and Culture degree be relatively easier?    Thank you! I delight in lurking on this forum and reading through the archives. It's helped me a lot! 
    • Fred0
      4
      This sentence:  给人家多道道乏,  is translated as "I appreciate very much her taking care of my child."     The child has been left with a wet nurse to be raised while the mother is working as a wet-nurse for a family in the city. She writes to her husband to not forget to pay the woman and to tell her... 丫头子那儿别忘了到时候送钱去! 给人家多道道乏。   My dictionary say 乏 means "short of, tired"    How is it that 道道乏  comes to mean appreciation?
    • Vladko27
      2
      Hello,   i got a Problem. Somehow i got a Virus on my Computer, and to delete it i need to type these Characters in, but i dont Know to what Language they Belong and how to Write them. I Would really appreciate it when Someone could tell if this is Chinese or another Language, and type me this Characters so i can copy and paste them in.   Please help me fast
    • Ratsy Brown
      7
      Hello all. I have an antique chinese silver bangle with chinese characters marked on the inside. Please can you help translate for me? Many thanks, Ratsy. 
    • Pengyou
      1
      I requested them to send me a link by email to get another password, but have not received the link - have tried this three times. The email that I used is a Hotmail email, if that makes any difference. What can I do?  What is the domain that tencent uses when responding to this kind of request?
    • Aceofface
      11
      Can anyone help with the translation of this and the artist?  Also, any recommendations on a book or website for translating old scrolls, bronzes, pottery, etc?  I bet soon there will be something like "face recognition" software that all you have to do is take a picture of the characters and it will automatically translate. Thanks.
    • markg
      0
      Hello.   have I made a mistake?   I am currently in the process of getting my Working Permit together with an employer in China. There has been some trouble, but I recently got all the necessary documents together, and my employer is putting in the application for a Working Permit this week. If the application is successful I will return home briefly to apply for the working visa.   However, in a moment of hedging bets, I also just applied for a school language program (which would give me a student visa). I applied because there was a deadline for the school applications, and I wanted to keep the student visa option open, in case the Working Permit falls through.   Will my application to study at the school create problems for my application for a Working Permit/ visa? Ideally I want the work permit.   thanks!
    • PaiMei
      0
      Dear members, I found an old Chinese painting mounted as a scroll  If possible would someone be so nice as to translate the symbole for me ?   Thanks a lot!!! samara        
    • Flickserve
      3
      There is a youtube channel about cooking   煮家男人 Bob's Your Uncle   The channel is orientated around cooking and anecdotes of life. The cantonese content is very colloquial and blunt. Typical of how a guy would do some straight talking amongst his friends and good learning material. If you read the Chinese, it doesn't match the spoken cantonese. The English subtitles are very entertaining and are not quite direct translations but capture the essence of the cantonese.   https://youtu.be/mzFvK5rYj8M
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