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    Since 2003, Chinese-forums.com has been helping people learn Chinese faster and get to China sooner. Our members can recommend beginner textbooks, help you out with obscure classical vocabulary, and tell you where to get the best street food in Xi'an. And we're friendly about it too. 

    Have a look at what's going on, or search for something specific. We hope you'll join us. 
  • Latest Topics

    • rossg
      0
      Hey. I was looking into wubi mainly just for fun, but had a question. Is there any way to type multiple characters at once in Wubi like you can in pinyin or do you have to press the space bar after every single character? I'm having trouble imagining how it could be faster than pinyin (for a skilled typist) if he/she is constantly mashing the space bar!.. Then again I probably am constantly mashing my space bar when typing English I'm just not as consciously aware.. Thanks.
    • kavanin
      4
      当问及“希望孩子将来达到什么学历”时,64.1%的家长回答是本科,23.4%的家长回答是大专,……   What is the meaning or function of 及 in this sentence, please?
    • Tomsima
      0
      In recent years I have gradually and tentatively adventured into the history of characters. It all started after funding the Outlier project on kickstarter; reading about the mess of lines that is(was?) 我  actually being a phonetic borrowing of a weapon called 'wo' (apologies to Oneeye I definitely don't have my accuracy down yet) just sparked my interest and I wanted to learn more.   I bought a copy of 段玉裁的說文解字注, and realised that although this tome of a book was fantastic to flick through, I had no idea how to read it. So yes, back to 文言文 I crawled, then off to the bookstore to grab a 說文解字精讀, and an additional copy of 徐鉉, and it's been a great adventure for months now.   And then Taobao went and did that annoying thing where it suggests some awesome thing that you might like.   A few days ago it suggested to me 《澄衷蒙学堂字课图说》. I do not claim to be an academic on the subject of 字 in any way, just someone really interested in the topic as it turns out. The description on Baidu says 是一部解释字根意义、正本清源的《说文解字》(it's a work on Character etymology, a 'thorough overhaul' of the Shuowen) But I have yet to come across this title in a book so far. Has anybody here used this book before?   For those interested: originally compiled in 1901, this work covers 3291 characters in an encyclopedia-style format, with the aim of providing a basis for literacy and a comprehensive fundamental education for students. It was republished in 2014 in traditional string-bound book form spanning 4 volumes.
    • Pengyou
      3
      Sorry to bother you with another logistics question.  Where can I find a big selection of decent but inexpensive Christmas trees and decorations?
    • sjrb
      13
      I'm sure this has been discussed elsewhere and I can't find the right keywords to search, but I couldn't seem find the right topics.    I understand that a wide variety of languages are spoken across China, with some highly similar to Putonghua and others completely different. I also understand that Mandarin is spreading and spoken by a decent chunk of the population, although I seem to get very different information as to how widespread it actually it.    I'm hoping to move to China to teach English next year, and continue learning Mandarin while I'm there. Should I limit my search to only firmly Mandarin cities, or consider others? How difficult is to to find people to talk to in Mandarin in a city that speaks a different dialect?    I've got current applications in progress for jobs in Beijing, Wuhan, and a few cities in Fujian, and I'm looking elsewhere as well, so any advice specific to Wuhan/Hubei and Fujian is appreciated.     
    • NaytanDova
      2
      There may be a title and signature on this but I’m unsure . Sorry about the bad quality, I’ll be able to take a clear photo in a few days. Any help appreciated. ;)
    • edelweis
      14
      I've only had moon cake once and didn't find it to my taste - bland except for the center which was way too salty for my idea of a dessert. However it was a packaged long-shelf-life industrial moon cake. Maybe the real thing is different?   Please tell me about your experience with moon cake.
    • Luxi
      2
      This article from the state sponsored "The World of Chinese" magazine talks about something a cultural rennaissance in Chinese TV. I'm not sure that's true, cultural content and quality of dramas and documentaries has plummeted compared to those in the 2000-2010 period.http://www.theworldofchinese.com/2017/12/tvs-cultural-revolution/ The article mentions 3 interesting programs. Here are the links to their respective CCTV web pages where there is a helpful introduction to each program (at least in the Poetry series) and a full archive of past offerings. All these programs now have clear Chinese subtitles.     The Chinese Poetry Competition《中国诗词大会》 I would need many long hours to get through the subs and unravel the very basics of what goes on in each program, but the short introduction in the web site is very helpful to get an idea of what is going on. The subs are very helpful!http://tv.cctv.com/2017/01/22/VIDAQoJpwyHDfoVTAuFqjrFd170122.shtml There already is a thread about the program in this Forum: https://www.chinese-forums.com/forums/topic/51296-classical-poetry-quiz-show/?tab=comments#comment-393164   Reading Aloud 《朗读者》 I've watched a few. Some readers are very good and some of the texts are interesting, but why is it that women guest readers feel they must read in a faltering voice while shedding glycerine tears?http://tv.cctv.com/lm/ldz/   National Treasure 《国家宝藏》http://tv.cctv.com/2017/11/29/VIDAjmY28VSqK4hfQtHw0yJE171129.shtml Looks promising and there may be English subs coming up in the CCTV/ CNTV 4 version.     
    • abcdefg
      4
      Limoncello is native to the citrus growing region along southern Italy's Amalfi Coast, but it can be home made in Kunming as well. We have an abundance of fresh, full-flavored citrus, especially in the cooler months of the year. If silk and porcelain and tea could make their way west centuries ago, no reason why the caravan cannot now head back to the east.   Home made limoncello has always been the best kind, with a taste more fruity and fresh than commercial brands. It is traditionally enjoyed as a post-prandial digestif, served cold in a small glass right after eating. It is also loved as an aperitif, before the meal. Or it can be turned into a tall drink with club soda or tonic water. It is sunny and bursting with fresh lemon/citrus flavor. Let me show you how I make it.   Buy a couple of bottles of trusty and potent Red Star Er Guo Tou 红星二锅头, which is known and maybe loved/maybe hated by every Old China Hand worth his salt. This notorious 白酒  is 52% alcohol, making it over 100 proof. One of the beauties of this recipe is that it is a way of "taming the dragon" -- transforming this fiery "rocket fuel" Er Guo Tou even beyond the palatable, actually turning it into a beverage which is smooth and enjoyable.         This is the famous grain neutral spirit that is sold in every hole in the wall lunch stand in "unit dose" sized bottles. You regularly see hard hat guys knocking it back with their noodles.  A 500 ml bottle of this powerful concoction costs the princely sum of 13 Yuan and 50 Mao. I used a bottle and a half, about 750 ml, just because of the size of my containers. The Er Guo Tou distillery produces some other whiskey that is more refined and lower proof. Don't need it; this original wild potion does just fine at a price which cannot be beat, only pennies more pricey than Coca Cola.   Buy four to six nice firm lemons, preferably from the market where they haven't been sprayed with wax to extend their shelf life (as is common in the US.) Oranges are prime just now and I bought five of those along with my five lemons. Limoncello can easily be modified by using part tangerines or grapefruit. I've experimented with youzi 柚子 (pomelo) and the small green limes 青柠蒙  that are so popular here. Both have very thin skin, making them difficult to use. But mixing lemon with another citrus fruit makes the resulting liqueur have a less aggressive character; sort of rounds it out.           Scrub them well with a vegetable brush and sharpen your best paring knife. The goal is to deftly remove the yellow zest with very, very little of the bitter white pith underneath. I used a ceramic-blade peeler and the paring knife. It takes some time to do this right. One can alternatively use a micro-plane grater, but it will make the finished product slightly cloudy.   Do the same with the oranges. Just like the lemons in the picture above, you can see the full thickness peel on the left, the white pith sliced away with careful scalpel strokes, leaving the finished peel on the right. I pull a chair up to the table, set it all out on a cutting board, put in earphones with some Bach or Beethoven, and take my time. Let my mind go blank into that semi-meditative 刀法 zone. (daofa = knife skills)               As you work, drop the finished peels into a big wide-mouth jar that contains your alcohol.       Screw the lid on tight. If the fit is not snug, put a piece of Saran wrap 保鲜膜 over the top before sealing. To backtrack a moment, Er Guo Tou is really not the only way to go. Everclear plain grain alcohol would do, but I've never seen it for sale in China. Similarly, vodka is ok, but you need the 100 proof kind, which is nearly impossible to find. You want a high alcohol content because it acts as a solvent and puts the aromatic elements of the fruit into solution.   Set this jar up on a shelf for at least a week. Every day or two agitate it gently. Some schools of though call for leaving it like that for a month or more. A week is as long as I've personally been able to delay. Maybe resting it longer would make it a hundred times better, but I will probably never know.   After a week, it is time to make it sweet. This is done with a Chinese version of simple syrup. Bing tang, Chinese rock sugar, 冰糖 adds an element of smoothness that works with the Er Guo Tou like the two were made for each other.           I used a cup of rock sugar and three cups of water. This will make the finished product about 50 proof, which is about right for my palate. You could use less water or more depending on your personal preference. Bring the sugar to a gentle boil in a saucepan, stirring off and on until it's all dissolved. After that, be sure to let it cool completely to room temperature. If you rush that step the resulting brew will be muddy in appearance.   Now pour the cooled simple syrup into the alcohol and citrus peels. Seal the jar again and let it stand overnight. My jar wasn't big enough to hold it all, so I improvised with a clean ceramic casserole.       Next morning strain it into a bottle. I used a fine mesh strainer first, set in a large funnel, then did it twice more with cheese cloth. One can also use a coffee filter, but I didn't have one. When you do this, don't be greedy. Don't try and press all the liquid through with a wooden spoon or such, determined to get the very last drop. The reason is that this would push through the unwanted crud attached to the peels; stuff  that you would like to discard.                             Here's my finished product. You can smell the citrus across the room. And the taste is smooth, without that ferocious 白酒 bite. I poured mine into a saved vodka bottle because it's the right size to fit in my fridge. This finished limoncello doesn't absolutely have to be refrigerated, but it keeps longer like this so I don't feel compelled to guzzle it too fast. Safe for a month or more. It still seems to disappear pretty smartly on its own; I sometimes think there must be some refrigerator mice with straws at work after lights out.             Why have I included a picture of ginger? Because I thought I would tell you a Chinese herbal secret. This limoncello is fantastic served hot with an additional squeeze of lemon or lime and several slices of fresh ginger. Put the juice, ginger, and a generous shot of limoncello into a mug and fill it with nearly-boiling water. In the technical parlance of Traditional Chinese Medicine, it will "cure what ails you."   So you have wound up with a bottle of first rate home-made joy that can be served strait as an aperitif, mixed tall with club soda or tonic water, taken after the meal to settle things, or utilized as medicine to chase away the winter vapors. Can't go wrong with that. Give it a try and see what you think.
    • HuayangAcademy
      0
      Hi guys,    We had a typical culture class this week in which we set about teaching our students ( and staff ) to become expert Jiaozi makers.  If anyones in Kunming and wants to take part please get in touch we hold different types of culture classes most weeks  
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