Learn Chinese in China
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    • Jon Long
      1
      This is Jon Long from Chinese Zero to Hero, it's nice to meet you all!   At Chinese Zero to Hero, we provide integrated HSK-based video courses that follow the HSK Standard Course textbooks by Jiang Liping. Our Website Our YouTube channel What makes Chinese Zero to Hero different Standardized and structured. We follow the HSK curriculum from day one, so can take the HSK test when you complete a course for that HSK level. Unlike most HSK courses out there, our courses are not test prep courses but are fully integrated courses that can rival language schools, hence the name "Zero to Hero". The learning outcomes are measurable (HSK test score), and our courses integrate well with other HSK-based learning products. Reading and writing characters from day 1. In our HSK 1 course, the first lesson requires that the student learns to write 你好 and 对不起. At the end of the lesson, we ask the student to create a greeting card with "你好" or "对不起". New learners can get used to characters quickly in a practical and enjoyable way, and it will save the learner much pain later on. We use textbooks. Just like language schools, our courses make use of textbooks to provide content and structure. This frees us from having to worry about content planning – when to teach what – so we can focus on presentation and delivery. The textbook also comes with a workbook that provides a lot of written practice for the students. By delegating these functions to the textbook, we can make polished courses at highly affordable price. We chose the "HSK Standard Course" textbooks by Jiang Liping because they are HSK based, up-to-date, and organized to incrementally teach grammar and communicative functions, which aligns with our teaching philosophy. Communicative and function-focused. Just like the HSK Standard Course textbooks, our lessons are focused on teaching students new grammar points to enable them to complete communicative functions. At the end of each lesson we provide pair activities and encourage students to use iTalki or HelloTalk to practice the language points they learned in the lesson with native speakers. In HSK 3 we demonstrate 40 pair activities with video, targeting specific grammar/functions and explicitly ask the students to find a language partner to complete the activities. Engaging instructional design We use instruction design principles proposed by Robert M. Gagné, starting each lesson with a warm-up, stimulate recall and background knowledge, engage in a short objective discussion, present vocabulary and grammar, then finish off with guided practice. We use multimedia learning principles proposed by Richard E. Mayer to make the videos easy to follow. For example, according to Mayer's research, showing our faces in the videos do not significantly improve learning outcome, so our videos are mostly animated slideshows without showing the instructor. This allows the students to focus on the content taught, and allows us to use bigger text so they read well on small screens. The videos are interwoven with live-action sequences demonstrating how the language point is used in real life. This makes the videos more and fun to watch. Affordable For each HSK level, our courses are divided into 2 halves: course A and course B, each costing $9. The cost of the textbook varies depending on where the student purchases them. We priced them low so that English speakers from less affluent countries can also afford them. We minimize the student's risk by allowing them to purchase each half-course individually, and offering a 30-day refund period. Why we started Chinese Zero to Hero Ken, Craig and I are based in Vancouver, Canada. We have a lot of friends who are learning Chinese, so I volunteered to teach them for free. I started tutoring back in 2014, and later on I organized students into classes, then dividing them into levels by HSK and follow the Standard Course textbooks.   However, most the my students are learning for pleasure only, they all have busy schedules and live across large distances, coming to my classes every week became a challenge. Online video courses seem to make more sense so they can take them at their own pace. But there was no structured online course that I can find that fits their level, so I decided to create my own. Ken (Chinese speaker) and Craig (HSK2 learner) also share the same passion, so together we started making the Chinese Zero to Hero courses in the winter of 2016.   We first finished the HSK 3 course in January 2017. We started with HSK 3 because most of our students were at that level. It also gives us a goal to aim for so we don't get stuck at HSK 1 with "你好" "谢谢" videos.   In order to fulfill the "Zero to Hero" promise, we finished producing the HSK 1 course on June 16, 2017, and HSK 2 on July 7, 2017. And we are aiming to finish all 6 HSK levels by the end of 2017. Our qualifications I'm responsible for most of the instructional design and delivery, but to be honest I'm not from a teaching background. I actually run a web designer agency which is my day job. But the passion to learn languages (I can speak 6 to varying degrees) and to teach others drove me to pursue this goal. I took the "Teach English Now" course on Coursera, which in my opinion is the best online course ever, and I drew a lot of inspiration from them. I'm also in the process of preparing to get the 国际汉语教师证书 (CTCSOL), that's when I came across the HSK Standard Course textbooks which are listed among their recommended textbooks. Behind the scenes facts Our courses are hosted on Teachable which handles all transactions, refunds, student management, and affiliate marketing. Our videos are created with Apple Keynote and edited with iMovie. TL;DR We're new to the forum here, and we hope to contribute by answering some of the grammar questions, and also seek help and guidance with regard to course content creation.
    • rolatis
      4
      I've recently come across these two characters and I have read that they are put in front of a color to turn the color into (light color), like light red for example. I'm just wondering if there is any difference between these two characters for describing light colors (e.g. like in different contexts you would use one character over another), or if these two characters can be used interchangeably.
    • LinYue
      6
      Hello friends, I have come to you looking for advice about what I can do. Next year, I want to apply for a Chinese Government Scholarship, to get a bachelor's degree in a Chinese university. My motivation for doing so is not very common (I think), so I really want to explain that first so you understand where I'm coming from.    I've seen some common objections and advice people have given in this forum to others, so I'll try to address some of them first:   1) The degree isn't worth very much internationally I come from a "third world" country, so I'm pretty sure the same could be said about getting a degree in the best university in the country (where I'm currently enrolled in). I've seen that, in my country, the language knowledge alone is very valuable. Most of the jobs I've gotten have come from being bilingual.    2) The education level isn't very high Again, I've been through 3 semesters in two very different majors in the best university in my country, and my biggest take away has been that if you want to get real knowledge, you're the one that's going to put in the leg work; I've had some really good professors, but for the most part they leave a lot to be desired. The same goes for the people studying with me, most of whom start university at 15/16 and, in the case of the latest major I'm enrolled in, just get in to change majors. Out of 40 people in a class, only two (myself included) actually liked the major! (anthropology). Some didn't even know what it was.    And I think it's important to explain why, if I'm enrolled at the best university in the country at a major that I like, I am looking to study elsewhere. Currently my country is undergoing a crisis. All sectors have been affected, including education. Not only are many of the best professors (and other professionals) leaving the country, but there are frequent riots that means the university closes down, sometimes for months at the time. I started my third semester this year in March/April, and though it's July, I've only had around 4 or 5 classes. combined. And there is one mandatory course that I am not able to take because there are no professors who are giving it. This same thing happened three years ago, and it meant a full year of college was lost.    Now, I'm 24 years old and though my country has different ideas than the US regarding when kids should leave they're parent's house, I still feel like an economical burden on my family. I have a job that pays well, but not well enough, and not stable enough to help them in the face of this crisis. I want to help them and my country, but I need a bachelor's degree, and the I feel deep uncertainty over the ability to even get that in the current situation.    And I love China and the Chinese language! I went to China two years ago, and stayed there for three weeks. I also got the chance to meet a lot of Chinese people working as an English teacher, and they were so warm and wonderful. Cultures and languages fascinate me, so I am really excited to explore an entirely different one.    Here is the part that I need advice in:  I love my current major, anthropology, but anticipate it might be really difficult to study it after 2 years of Chinese language study (1 year self-studying, and 1 year in the CSC language program). I'm fully confident of my language abilities, but it's hard to know what to expect. So yesterday I thought about perhaps doing a Bachelors on something language-oriented instead, Chinese Language, or a Chinese Language and Culture degree. I'd like to ask your opinions! Should I just jump in the deep end with the Anthropology degree? Would a Chinese Language/Language and Culture degree be relatively easier?    Thank you! I delight in lurking on this forum and reading through the archives. It's helped me a lot! 
    • Fred0
      4
      This sentence:  给人家多道道乏,  is translated as "I appreciate very much her taking care of my child."     The child has been left with a wet nurse to be raised while the mother is working as a wet-nurse for a family in the city. She writes to her husband to not forget to pay the woman and to tell her... 丫头子那儿别忘了到时候送钱去! 给人家多道道乏。   My dictionary say 乏 means "short of, tired"    How is it that 道道乏  comes to mean appreciation?
    • Vladko27
      2
      Hello,   i got a Problem. Somehow i got a Virus on my Computer, and to delete it i need to type these Characters in, but i dont Know to what Language they Belong and how to Write them. I Would really appreciate it when Someone could tell if this is Chinese or another Language, and type me this Characters so i can copy and paste them in.   Please help me fast
    • Ratsy Brown
      9
      Hello all. I have an antique chinese silver bangle with chinese characters marked on the inside. Please can you help translate for me? Many thanks, Ratsy. 
    • Pengyou
      2
      I requested them to send me a link by email to get another password, but have not received the link - have tried this three times. The email that I used is a Hotmail email, if that makes any difference. What can I do?  What is the domain that tencent uses when responding to this kind of request?
    • Aceofface
      32
      Can anyone help with the translation of this and the artist?  Also, any recommendations on a book or website for translating old scrolls, bronzes, pottery, etc?  I bet soon there will be something like "face recognition" software that all you have to do is take a picture of the characters and it will automatically translate. Thanks.
    • markg
      0
      Hello.   have I made a mistake?   I am currently in the process of getting my Working Permit together with an employer in China. There has been some trouble, but I recently got all the necessary documents together, and my employer is putting in the application for a Working Permit this week. If the application is successful I will return home briefly to apply for the working visa.   However, in a moment of hedging bets, I also just applied for a school language program (which would give me a student visa). I applied because there was a deadline for the school applications, and I wanted to keep the student visa option open, in case the Working Permit falls through.   Will my application to study at the school create problems for my application for a Working Permit/ visa? Ideally I want the work permit.   thanks!
    • PaiMei
      0
      Dear members, I found an old Chinese painting mounted as a scroll  If possible would someone be so nice as to translate the symbole for me ?   Thanks a lot!!! samara        
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