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    • HK128
      2
      Hi   I hope this is the most appropriate place to post my question which is as per title of this thread.   I'm Chinese but born and brought up in the western world, but have always been told that after surgery (with scars), that certain foods should be avoided for as long as possible.  Such as beef, eggs, sesame seeds/oil, non-scaled fish, seafood such as prawns/crab, soy sauce, asparagus, nuts (all types of nuts such as almonds?) and the list goes on.   Some say to avoid for the first few months, some say a year.  What I don't understand is we're all humans, so why is it that most - if not all - of the above foods are encouraged in the western world as they contain beneficial vitamins etc to promote healing?   Do all Chinese avoid certain foods after surgery?        
    • Larry Language Lover
      2
      There's a thread on here about a downloadable computer program used by Chinese people to click on words and get the translation.  I installed it sometime back and found it quite useful.  It is all in Chinese, from a Chinese company used by Chinese to learn languages,  but it works for clicking on Chinese characters when reading and getting the meaning in English. My daughter accidently deleted this app when trying to make room to install games, and I'd like to re-install it.  Does anyone remember this thread?  Thanks!
    • ninth_nomad
      0
      Hello :)    I'm an 18 year old student from Malaysia thinking about studying in China. I'm interested in drug research and I've recently gotten a full scholarship to study pharmacy in China Pharmaceutical University (CPU) in Nanjing. I think it's a good opportunity but it's unlikely I'll be able to practice pharmacy back in my own country with a bachelor's degree from CPU since the uni isn't on the list of recognized universities.    So here is my question: Has anyone here studied in CPU? What is it like there? Is it a good university? (It's hovering somewhere around the 80th in China's university rankings, is that bad?) Are there better universities that offer courses in English? (I'm Malaysian Chinese but my Mandarin is pretty rusty)   What are the job opportunities like after graduation? What's the pharmaceutical industry in China like?   I'm pretty desperate for advice since I can barely find anything on CPU. So thanks in advance for any information at all. :) 
    • abcdefg
      3
       @roddy --  Who else do we have in the US, bar @abcdefg? Things there make the UK look organised, was wondering what the on-the-ground reports were...   Report from a displaced 中国通 in America. Getting by in the Time of the Virus.   Some of the incorporated suburbs of Dallas have recently passed a "shelter in place" order that means everyone needs to stay home if they are not going to and from their "essential" jobs or shopping for groceries/prescription pharmaceuticals. Other suburbs nearby have adopted a "libertarian" stance in which they decline to do that because it would infringe citizen rights. It has created a patchwork quilt.    The small town in which I live has been a little more relaxed up to now. Many restaurants open for takeout. I have personally found grocery stores to be clean and orderly. They have hired quite a few temporary workers to wipe down the shelves and put up arriving supplies. They no longer have 27 brands of breakfast cereal, which I always found somewhat ridiculous in the first place. Fruit and vegetables and meat are coming in fresh, again with slightly less selection, but no way could it be considered a hardship.    The local hospital (where I worked for many years) is seeing patients more or less as usual, with temperature screening as one enters the premises. No tent on the parking lot. More personal protective equipment in use. Texas has started way too late and has dedicated way to little effort into preventive medical measures. I doubt they can ever catch up. People arriving from Louisiana are required to self quarantine, as mentioned above. Lots of the things the officials are doing now seem to be mainly for show. They are closing the barn door after they cows have escaped and scattered.     I am having a new roof put on. Spoke with the contractor an hour ago (Monday morning) and he said everything is still on schedule. They will bring out the new shingles and other materials this afternoon, and will do the actual work tomorrow and the next day if it's not raining. He said he still has adequate labor crews. (Construction is deemed an "essential occupation.")    Banks have closed their lobbies, as have most other businesses. Drive-through service is still available for check cashing and deposits. E-banking is less developed in small-town Texas than it is in China.    Nobody here wears masks. Hand sanitizer has been sold out for over a month. I still meet people when out and about who want to shake hands. They give me a look when I decline. Happened as recently as yesterday.    Republicans and Democrats are squabbling about how to administer a big, headline-grabbing aid package. So the actual grass roots response gets delayed. An ER doctor friend in Atlanta told me last week that during his last shift his hospital had 31 needy candidates for each available ventilator. They are having to do very difficult triage. Despite having written guidelines available, the burden falls on the doctor explaining things to the relatives.    Texas Medical Association, of which I am still a member, has prevailed on the legislature to allow retired physicians to return to limited practice, mainly doing telemedicine handling less pressing patient inquiries and concerns. I phoned them and learned that the regulation only applies to physicians who retired 2 years ago or less. I hung up my spurs/stethoscope a decade ago, so unfortunately cannot contribute in that manner. (Probably a good thing since I'm woefully/dangerously out of date.)    Yesterday I dug out some Chinese textbooks for review. Also look forward to improving my penmanship/calligraphy.
    • roddy
      0
      Background and intro   Chapter 3, a little shorter at 8,500 characters. Little bit of a rush today.    1) At the school. Scott and Chen sit through dull speeches at a school. Pay attention to the photograph Chen looks at - the events surrounding the image are very important. We learn that Chen is, unsurprisingly, a member of the Chen clan, if somewhat estranged. Bit of Chen reminiscing about Silicon Isle.    2) We meet 陈贤运, aka 陈董,who's the effective head of the Chen clan. There is a kind-of retired elder who's technically the boss, we'll meet him later. Chen (Kaizong) is, as far as I've read, the most interesting of the characters and it's quite fun watching him awkwardly reconnect with the clan. There's also discussion of the value of the clan system and why it's survived so long, in the context of the US company's offer. There's also a warning to be careful when on the 罗家地盘 and a promise of a visit to the 普度施孤大会   3) Bit of a flashback to a class discussion globalisation and some of Chen's thoughts on his cross-cultural status.    4) 普度施孤大会 - ie, Ghost Festival, and initially compared to Halloween and later a carnival. I like the irony of the ghost money being banned as environmentally unfriendly, and there's some detail on how online banking has reached the spirit world. I also liked "历史是一个对事件去情绪化的过程". But you'd be forgiven for wondering if anything is going to happen...   5) A damsel in distress! Or maybe a bachelor in bother. Where have we seen someone matching this description before? Chen valiantly goes to her aid, gets himself into a potential pickle, and is rescued by 'Uncle' chen. Watch out for 刀仔, who we see more of than we might want to later on, and mention of the Luo clan boss (罗锦城, 罗老板) - why is he so keen to get this particular 垃圾人 back? Chen Kaizong persuades his uncle to shelter... 小米, who is a girl. The final heavily-drawn parallel with the US civil rights movement is a little unnecessary, I'd say.    I was particularly slack on vocab with this chapter.    蒙太奇 - montage 聚酰亚胺 - polyimide 丛林社会 - tribal society? Not sure.  莱卡 - lycra, or Leica, but here lycra.  三十的月娘,残咯 - totally didn't get this. 
    • feihong
      5
      I'm thinking about starting a blog for Chinese writing exercises. Basically, each blog post would provide a prompt and the reader would need to write something in response. Nothing too complicated, basically you read a little bit and then write something related to what you read. Before I start the blog, I want to see what else is out there, and after some googling, I came up with nothing. I guess the main problem is that if you search for "chinese writing exercises" you end up with exercises for writing 汉子, which isn't at all what I'm looking for.   Does anyone know of any existing online resource for this sort of thing?    
    • Beo
      3
      hi guys,   I've found these two sentences:   男:方向肯定没错,估计再有几分钟就到了吧。 女:再晚了我们就来不及看表演了。   I'm not sure how to translate the 再 in both sentences. Is it maybe some kind of grammar structure?    Did some reseach on this but couldn't find anything.   Cheers Beo
    • vellocet
      5
      I keep needing goods that are only sold in the States.  But, every time, I'm able to find a substitute product on Alibaba.  Does anyone have experience ordering from them in China?  They also quote U.S. prices, I would hope that Chinese prices would be available inside China.  
    • abcdefg
      11
      Am trying to do some sober reflection on how much my life will need to change as regards living in China. Currently I am at home in Texas, instead of in my “second home,” which is Kunming.   China has closed its door to returning expats regardless of visa status, so going back right now is not even an issue. Assuming that I can get back in a month or two, I am asking myself if that will be a sensible thing to do.   In Kunming I pursue several enjoyable hobbies and I have several good friends but being retired means I don’t have a job there. No contractual obligations beyond the 6-month lease on my Kunming apartment.     As a US citizen, I currently enter China on a tourist visa with 10-year validity, expiring in December of 2024. The terms of the visa are that I must exit and re-enter once every 60 days.   Two questions come to mind regarding the visa requirements, neither with a firm answer. First, I wonder if the authorities will now look more closely at my “very-long-duration-tourist” status. Second, I wonder if I might have to face quarantine every time that I make these visa-stamp runs. Potentially even on both ends of the trip.   Is anyone else in the same situation or having the same sort of uncertain thoughts? Any constructive comments or suggestions?    
    • Anna32
      1
      大家好! Can someone please explain me what character is this? (Write it) I can't understand it. Thank you! 
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