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back formation - from dialects (mostly Cantonese) to


TSkillet
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Where have you seen "deshi" used anywhere outside of Hong Kong or the Cantonese-speaking region? In Taiwan, taxis are called Jichengche and Chuzuqiche in the mainland. The *ONLY* time I heard of anything remotely close to "deshi" being used was when I was in Beijing, a Korean student told me that "da di" is a slang for "to take a cab", I'm assuming the "di" is the same character as "de" in "deshi". But then again, I haven't really heard anyone else use that term in the month and half I spent in Beijing.

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roddy - my mandarin teacher tells me that the "zai3" is a cantonese back formation into mandarin - and is only of recent vintage. She's not very happy about the addition of cantonese type phrases into mandarin.

kulong - a lot of people I know in Beijing do use the "da di" slang - which is from the "dap dik" in Cantonese - and it's certainly common to use the mandarin version of cantonese phrases in cities in Guangdong. I'd also heard it several times in Shanghai when I was living there - it's not common, but it's not out of the ordinary either. I never did here in taiwan.

Funny enough, most of my cantonese friends don't even call it a "dik-see" anymore - they say "tax" - like "let's take the tax" - as in the english word. But they're strange.

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roddy - my mandarin teacher tells me that the "zai3" is a cantonese back formation into mandarin - and is only of recent vintage. She's not very happy about the addition of cantonese type phrases into mandarin.

That's true. But actually the word "zai" is also used in many other Southern dialects such as Taiwanese (Minnanhua).

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That 'de' can also be pronounced as 'di' - examples are as Choudoufu mentions in 打的 - take a cab, and also 的哥 - taxi driver (also 的姐)

It's also pronounced 'di' in '的确' - actually, really.

I've also heard it pronounce 'di' by kids when you'd normally expect 'de' and in some really really bad songs

ie.

这是谁的?

我的 (wodi)

Roddy

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it's 的士 - just so we're clear - on the Hong Kong taxis. So in pinyin - that's "deshi"

I still think it could be dishi... 的 has three readings in pinyin (de di2 di4). And to repeat myself, the slang expression to catch a cab is "da di" not "da de". Are you positive it's "deshi"?

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holyman - I don't really know Cantonese coding for tones since I never learned it formally - but it's really a "dik see" sound The Dik sound is a lot like the mandarin tone (high and across) while the si is similar to mandarin 3rd (starts high and falls and goes up again- but it's not quite)

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well, maybe my cantonese different or i could be wrong. i think different places they varied a bit. my place was influence more by english and people dont really use chinese writing, so they tend to go tone1 for 'see', closer to english. if u take the chinese term 'deshi', however, i think yours is probably correct.

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