Jump to content
Chinese-forums.com
Learn Chinese in China

what is a Shanghai Princess exactly? socially bad or good??


geek_frappa
 Share

Recommended Posts

Site Sponsors:
Pleco for iPhone / Android iPhone & Android Chinese dictionary: camera & hand- writing input, flashcards, audio.
Study Chinese in Kunming 1-1 classes, qualified teachers and unique teaching methods in the Spring City.
Learn Chinese Characters Learn 2289 Chinese Characters in 90 Days with a Unique Flash Card System.
Hacking Chinese Tips and strategies for how to learn Chinese more efficiently
Popup Chinese Translator Understand Chinese inside any Windows application, website or PDF.
Chinese Grammar Wiki All Chinese grammar, organised by level, all in one place.

I think Shanghai princess should only appear in the table dance or bisthol, and the nickname is still popular in some red-light districts in the so-called "Oriental" regions.

The nickname probably was originated in the french colonial period in 19-20 century in Shanghai that was notorious for free-trade opiums, gangs, and prosititutes. So i believe you should avoid using it to refer to any girl.

However, there's a similar word for man, but the meaning is quite different. There's an entertaining businessman in hongkong whose ancestor came from shanghai. As he's the boss of the New World, one of most trendy places in shanghai, his nickname is coined as 上海姑爺 . (Shanghai Guye)

姑爺 (Guye) is someone who must be rich, have a taste of lifestyle. He may also be dissolute in his conducts and inherit lot of money from his ancestor, not able and necessary to work. However, all these attributes aren't always linked up with 姑爺. That's why the boss of New World accepts this nickname.

In hongkong, 姑爺仔 (A little 姑爺) also refers to someone who earns their living by forcing his girlfriend(S) to be prostitutes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

in my opinion,shanghai princess figures that shanghai women/girls maybe more self-conceit than women in other palces in china.

you know that ,shanghai is the most prosperous region in china ,so the girls and women pride themselves for their fashion and richness . their behaviors look like a pricess.

it's just my individual opinion :lol:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

Well, I read that topic title and automatically assumed it would be a female Shanghai native with the characteristics typically ascribed to the U.S.'s so-called "Jewish American Prinessses." From http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=J.A.P. Just substitute "Shanghai" wherever "Jewish" appears below; could that be what the term represents?

J.A.P.

Jewish American Princess; a bitchy, spoiled, golddigging Jewish female; Raised in a wealthy household, selfish, high-maintenance to the point of sheer insanity, stuck-up, the worst woman to date/marry on planet earth, yet deemed the most desirable by jewish mothers, who attempt to force them down the throats of their unsuspecting sons (all for the sake of preserving "Jewish Heritage.")

A Female who collects designer fashion items and status symbols (including men).

Bane to the existence of dating men. The key to an unhappy relationship for the rest of your life. Large breasted, outwardly attractive, internally spoiled, greedy, complicated, self-righteous, and obnoxiously difficult and overbearing jewish female.

Just a possibility.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

when i lived in shanghai, I would (when i deigned to be near them) hear foreigners say it. it is a 凶 woman, typically shanghainese, expert at 撒娇, filled with 哼 and 呸. decked out in prada and lv and burbury, whatever the fashion is now (sorry, i have been gone since early this year, so I don't know).

If you call a shanghai princess on her phone and ask her where she is, the best answer you will ever get is "外面". one is too many and five are not enough.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I do love that answer. It doesn't even mean 'outside', you might well be sitting in a restaurant or at a friend's place if you are zai waimian. It would never work in English (or Dutch, or any other language I know): where are you? Not at home. Yes, but where[i/] not at home?

In the same category:

With who are you? Gen pengyou. (can be male, female, one or many) or Gen Mingming he tamen. (tamen can be male, female, one or many)

Are you coming over tomorrow? No, I don't have time, you shi. (can be any shi, including sleeping, watching tv, or doing absolutely nothing)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 years later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and select your username and password later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Click here to reply. Select text to quote.

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...