Jump to content
Chinese-forums.com
Learn Chinese in China

Review of Common Chinese Patterns 330


Recommended Posts

Site Sponsors:
Pleco for iPhone / Android iPhone & Android Chinese dictionary: camera & hand- writing input, flashcards, audio.
Study Chinese in Kunming 1-1 classes, qualified teachers and unique teaching methods in the Spring City.
Learn Chinese Characters Learn 2289 Chinese Characters in 90 Days with a Unique Flash Card System.
Hacking Chinese Tips and strategies for how to learn Chinese more efficiently
Popup Chinese Translator Understand Chinese inside any Windows application, website or PDF.
Chinese Grammar Wiki All Chinese grammar, organised by level, all in one place.

For which learners is the book suitable? There seem to be some really easy patterns (还没……呢 - beginner level imho) and much more advanced expressions (……和……比起来) ...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Unfortunately with my current level of Chinese it's difficult for me to assess exactly how advanced some of those patterns are. For the purpose of writing this review I have covered only the expressions that I have encountered in my Chinese studies to date. From what I understand the book is not suited specifically for any particular level, but rather a compilation of the common patterns, some of which being easier and more common than others.

 

If you go to the following link, you can see a breakdown of the patterns by HSK level (taking into account the characters and not the patterns): http://www.hskhsk.com/2/post/2013/06/common-chinese-patterns-330-by-hsk-level.html

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
Demonic_Duck
If you go to the following link, you can see a breakdown of the patterns by HSK level (taking into account the characters and not the patterns): http://www.hskhsk.co...-hsk-level.html

First one in HSK1 is 爱~不~... I swear I've never learnt this, never come across this in daily life or in writing, and if I did come across it wouldn't know what it meant.

 

Does this mean I'm not yet at HSK1 level? :shock:

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Demonic_Duck

Sure, I understand it now I've looked it up. What I mean is, if I hadn't looked it up, and had seen it somewhere that the meaning wasn't made clear by context clues, I probably wouldn't have understood it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
russmeier

Ania,

Thanks for the review. Please tell us if the introduction of the pattern and explanations are in English and Chinese or just in Chinese. That makes a big difference to learners based on current skill level. Some advanced speakers and readers might be able to use an all Chinese book, but most beginning and intermediate learners could not.

Thanks

Russ

Link to post
Share on other sites

Russ, thank you for pointing out that I forgot to mention that important fact. I added the information to my review :)

 

The explanations, examples and dialogues are both in Chinese and English, but the exercises are in Chinese only (minus the instructions which are also Chinese-English). 

Link to post
Share on other sites
russmeier

Ania,

Thanks for clarifying the English-Chinese combinations. I just ordered one and look forward to reading it and working the exercises.

Russ

Link to post
Share on other sites
大肚男

 

First one in HSK1 is 爱~不~... I swear I've never learnt this, never come across this in daily life or in writing, and if I did come across it wouldn't know what it meant.

 

Does this mean I'm not yet at HSK1 level?  :shock:

 

The HSK classification is only based on what characters are in the pattern. For the 爱~不~ example, both 爱 and 不 are HSK 1 characters, so the pattern 爱~不~ is classified as HSK 1.

 

For the pattern ~,  is an HSK2 character, and  are HSK1 characters, so the pattern is classified as an HSK2 pattern.

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
PBolchover

I have found that this book is an excellent companion to "Road to Success: Upper Elementary".  The sentence patterns appear to be at the upper elementary / lower intermediate level.  (I.e students who are confident with "ba" sentences, -zhe, -le and -guo, and also complements, will start learning sentence patterns similar to this in their next level of study)

Link to post
Share on other sites
Demonic_Duck
The HSK classification is only based on what characters are in the pattern. For the 爱~不~ example, both 爱 and 不 are HSK 1 characters, so the pattern 爱~不~ is classified as HSK 1.

 

For the pattern ~,  is an HSK2 character, and  are HSK1 characters, so the pattern is classified as an HSK2 pattern.

 

Aaah, I see. That makes a lot more sense, then.

 

Also, in one of those marvelous moments of language learning serendipity that seem to happen implausibly frequently, I first noticed this structure in a native context just yesterday (爱信不信).

 

Edit: I also just realised my English reading comprehension sucks, I missed the part in Ania's post explaining this... d'oh!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • New Members

Went through a similar book (don't know the name) and a good chunk maybe 80% were useable stuff that you'd run into (although actually using all of them yourself doesn't really pan out just from reading about them I wouldn't say).  These types of books are more valuable to go through than most generic vocab lessons since the phrases aren't something you could figure out on your own with a dictionary. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd just like to add how stupid that site linking the patterns to HSK levels is - except, as someone said, because it gives a complete list. I started looking at it and then realized you don't get any such patterns at all at HSK 1. Incidentally, they give 68 as 的话, which doesn't match my copy of the book.

There is not even any guarantee that the patterns selected as HSK 1 are easier or more common than those selected as higher levels.

Rubbish!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I read what Ania wrote (had assumed she was a woman). But I still didn't really register it, because it seems so ridiculous. So I thought I'd emphasize it here.

 

Sorry if that annoyed you, but that's what the internet is like!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 year later...
ChTTay

Better extremely late than never. Alina has done a good job of giving a general overview of the book
330 Common Chinese Patterns so I won't go into that too much.

The layout of the book is straightforward and easy to use. Each page is devoted to a specific structure
and this includes a basic definition, example sentences and dialogues as well as a few exercises.
I like the English definition given at the top of the page for easy reference.

There are plenty of examples to help you understand how the structure is used. They could perhaps
update or change the example sentences to make sure they're ones that a typical student of Chinese
would either use or hear in daily life. I found some didn't seem that useful. This could just be my
level of Chinese though.

The exercises are also useful in helping to understand how the structure is used. In an ideal world,
there would be more of these and a variety. However, as each common pattern is limited to a page there
just isn't enough room for more exercises. I think a small 'work book' to accompany the main book
could be a good addition. It could give even more examples, include gapfills, and maybe some longer
writing/essay style sections where you need to use multiple sentence patterns to answer.

There are a few sentence patterns in the book that are also in HSK exams. However, I wouldn't say that
this should be the main reason for using the book. Most of the patterns here seem more about day to
day life, speaking Chinese. I am using the text book 'developing chinese' [int 1 speaking] at the moment and it has
a number of structures that, per my tutor, are often used by Chinese people. My tutor also said that
any student that understands and uses these regularly is one that has really made the jump to a higher
level.

As it happens, a lot of the patterns and structures in this speaking textbook are also in 330. This is great for
me as it means I have additional explanations and examples to reference. I find the 'developing chinese'
textbook has better exercises but lacks explanation. The two together work really well. I have also noticed some of the patterns cropping up in daily life.

I don't currently use much native material as I'm only now slowly slowly getting back to studying
Chinese after a fairly long break (11-12 months). I'm hoping I start to hear these patterns in daily
life and perhaps on TV once I get to that point.

Overall, I would recommend this book to anyone. It's well worth having this as a companion to your
regular speaking textbook.
 

Edit: I forgot to mention I was given the book in the same give-a-way as above.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 years later...
ChTTay

Bump. Anyone made flashcards in anki for 330? 

 

I’m either looking to get some pre-made ones OR just advice on how to make them (a good layout in Anki which I’ve ever really used properly). 

 

Any help apprexiated 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and select your username and password later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Click here to reply. Select text to quote.

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...