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Working in China


Coys1991
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What's the best type of job to do in Shanghai?  I have a history degree with a focus in Chinese.  But recently I want to do some type of translation work.  Would it be good to do this?  Possibly for an American company that's over in China or work with a Chinese company that does business with America?  When I go back to Shanghai, I will be taking the HSK tests I have never done them before.  But it's time I really need to crack down on my Chinese.  What are some good language schools to go to in Shanghai? 

Thanks everyone much appreciated.

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As far as I'm aware, getting decently paid translation work in China is very difficult due to the number of Chinese who speak English well and can do the work cheaper, and probably faster, as well as visa hassles for this type of work (most employers can't be bothered dealing with foreigners' visas when there are thousands of Chinese who can do the job). Most people working in China either seem to be English (or other) teachers, or people whose companies has sent them.

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That's what I was almost of thinking of doing.  I am teacher there now but I could work and represent as a person from a United States company probably.  I was reading some one else's article and they mentioned how competitive it is over there.  

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Is it possible to work, e.g do some part-time teaching, on a long-term student visa? Also, how difficult is it to find for a non-native-speaker, although a native level speaker, an English teaching job in Shanghai? Is it the passport that matters, the qualifications or does being a waiguoren suffice sometimes? I am just trying to come up with ways to earn some pocket money to finance my stay and studies in Shanghai.

 

Edit: I read that X-type visa by itself doesn't give you the right to work in China, but it is possible to get some sort of permit from the university. Can anyone elaborate on that, please?

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I think they have a new visa type for the right to work in China.  But my boss helped me with that.  It's kinda of complicated when doing the visa things I think.  So I wouldn't be able to help you with that part.

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You want to be a translator and have beginner to intermediate Chinese?  Translating doesn't even pay that well unless you do it right.  If you just compete on the open market, it's hard.  Plus, the sorts of things you have to translate are horribly boring.  I had to translate industrial machinery manuals into English and that was an a real effort of brain-sweat to do. 

 

X visa allows internship in an industry relating to your major. 

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I wouldn't try to be a Chinese to English translator in China, as others mention, the market is crowded with people who can do it much cheaper.

Perhaps try to find a local position in a foreign company active in China. Don't expect huge pay, but it can be useful experience.

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@Coys1991

 

MBA is a just piece of paper. Its value comes from two sources:

1) Your years of experience supporting it

2) The connections you establish with your classmates during the program

 

Unless you have an MBA from a top Ivy League B-school, it's not a golden ticket to anywhere (and especially not to China).

Decent MBA programs require for at least 3 years of work experience (and I have my doubts whether teaching counts or not).

 

For doing business in China, you can either be the "laowai monkey", where nothing else matters only your appearance and English abilities. Finding this kind of jobs are getting harder, as there are a lot of foreigners in the country.

The other way is to present a skill unique at your choice of industry. Teaching is a somehow lucrative business in the Far East, as most Asians have problems speaking foreign languages. Other unique skills are harder to acquire, as you probably need that unique skill and a good command of Chinese.

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