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Best Mandarin language course/school in Shenzhen?


evr-since
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Looks like these folks have a school there: https://mandarinhouse.com/learn-chinese-in-shenzhen 

 

Obviously, you need to contact them to be sure they didn't go under during the pandemic lock down. I took a course of study from the same outfit in Beijing in the Spring of 2006. (So long ago as to scarcely be relevant.) 

 

Since you have enough time, the best bet might be to take a university Mandarin course and supplement it with lots of extra-curricular activities that require Chinese and lots of private tutoring on the side. Know in advance that the university course will be pretty lame and not enough by itself. It will require personal initiative to make the year worthwhile. 

 

Supplemental one-to-one tutoring should not be difficult to arrange once you arrive -- I would expect to find notes on bulletin boards in the university district. Also, just asking around once you are boots on the ground is usually fruitful. Tune in to current casual recommendations from locals.

 

Cannot help you beyond that. I have been to Shenzhen many times as a tourist, but never as a student of Mandarin. 

 

Just wondering, although it's none of my business -- Why in the world did you choose Shenzhen as the site of your "Chinese year?" 

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Thanks for the advices!

Yes, I'm aware that no language course would be as fruitful as immersing in the language with a lot of personal initiatives.

 

For conversation it shouldn't be a problem, as my girlfriend is native and she lives there. So that also explains why Shenzhen ;)

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21 hours ago, evr-since said:

For conversation it shouldn't be a problem, as my girlfriend is native and she lives there. So that also explains why Shenzhen ;)

 

I understand! Hope it works out well. 

 

Need to give some thought to the best ways of obtaining a visa. Currently it is very restrictive, very difficult. When the situation loosens up some, being enrolled in a Chinese university for language study might be best. Private language schools usually are not able to arrange visas for the sort of long stay you are seeking.  

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Need to give some thought to the best ways of obtaining a visa. Currently it is very restrictive, very difficult. When the situation loosens up some, being enrolled in a Chinese university for language study might be best. Private language schools usually are not able to arrange visas for the sort of long stay you are seeking.  

 

Didn't know about that! Thanks for letting me know.

 

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What is wrong with Shenzhen? My Chinese buddies say it is the "it" city for millenials (?)

 

True! Also according to what I've been told by my partner, it's a very "active" city and the population is largely made of young (working) people.
I guess when people think of studying the language in China they would imagine Beijing, or maybe Shanghai, for their historical/economic importance. Also, these cities may probably benefit of a wider choice of Universities and language courses.
With that said, personally I wouldn't mind a more modern environment for my language experience ☺️

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On 7/1/2021 at 2:15 PM, Jan Finster said:

What is wrong with Shenzhen? My Chinese buddies say it is the "it" city for millenials (?)

 

Didn't mean to imply it was a bad place to go. Just not one of the traditional cities that foreigners usually seek out when wanting to learn about Chinese culture and language. 

 

I spent a couple very good years in Zhuhai, pretty close by. It was also a non-traditional place to study, but I loved the ambience of the city and managed to find good teachers. Plus the seafood was great: fresh and reasonably priced. I enjoyed the Southern tea culture and relaxed weekend brunches.

 

One of the attractions of both Zhuhai and Shenzhen is their proximity to Hong Kong and Macau. It was so easy to go across for a change of pace. I took advantage of that and had a chance to learn my way around across the border somewhat.

 

 

 

 

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On 6/30/2021 at 10:50 PM, abcdefg said:

 

I didn't study with them, but my teacher recommended Mandarin House as a centre for taking my HSK/HSKK exams 3 years ago in Shanghai, since she used to work for them. 


They seemed pretty competent and the Shanghai centre was well-equipped.

 

Regarding visas their website says:

 

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We recommend you apply for the L visa (tourist visa) if you are staying for less than 3 months, or the X2 Visa (student visa) if you plan to stay for longer than 3 months. China’s visa policy is subject to change; please contact us before you come to China to explore your options if your visa doesn’t cover the length of your stay.

 

For longer than 6 months you would need an X1 visa, and unlike universities I think very few private schools are able to provide the right kind of admission notice and JW202 form for this. Keats school in Kunming certainly can, and this is what they say about visas:
 

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[...] after we receive full tuition fee for the entire course through bank transfer, we will send you the official Admission Notice on behalf of Keats School to apply for a student visa (X1/X2) in your country. The X1 visa is for a program longer than 6 months while the X2 student visa is for a program shorter than 6 months. [...]

Please Note: The tourist visa can no longer be changed to a student visa after you arrive in China. In order to avoid unnecessary cost, please make sure to enter China with an X1 or X2 student visa.

 

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