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x_o 88

What is this character?

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x_o 88

i saw this character in a newspaper, but have no idea how to pronounce it, and i can not find this word in the dictionary!

the left side is a 由 and the right side is a 页. does anyone know what character this is?! thanks!

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Quest

Okay I found it in the dictionary, it's di2 頔 meaning 美好

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x_o 88

Thanks! is there anyway you could type it in simplified for me? because i can not find this word in simplified anywhere!

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skylee

According to Xiandai Hanyu Cidian, the pronunciation is di2, and the meaning is "美好,多用於人名".

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x_o 88

thanks! but is there no way to type this character in simplified?!

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Yuchi

I don't think it has a simplification :-?

edit: let me look somemore

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x_o 88

^ well i saw it in print o_o. is this character that rarely used?

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Glenn

I couldn't find it when I entered "di" or when I looked in the character palette, so I'm going with no simplified form.

[Edit] There are two that I'd like to know about. The first looks like 先 with a 一 on top of it, and the second looks like 会 with a 不 on top. Anyone have any ideas?

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chenpv

totally agree with Skylee. you can simplify the right part of this character to '页':)

PS: skylee,好久没有读到你的帖子了,呵呵。

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Mugi

Glenn, the short answer is that the 会 with a 不 on top has been created by 闽 (mǐn) speakers to represent, you guessed it, 不会, in a similar way to 甭 (béng) having been created for the phonetic merging of 不 and 用 in Mandarin. You'll see the character (and variations of it) a lot in Fujian, Taiwan and Guangdong.

It's actually a little more complicated than this. Let me know if you'd like a fuller explanation.

Can't help with the 一 and 先 character yet - will have a search for it tonight once I get home.

By the way, where did you come across these characters?

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nipponman

Are these the same characters you asked about on Teach yourself Japanese's board? Cause I can't see them.

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Glenn

Thanks for the answer; I had figured it would be something like that.

I came across them in the character palette. There are lots like them, which I'm guessing are characters idiosyncratic of differenct dialects/languages. For instance, there's 冇, which I understand as being a Cantonese character for 没有. The two that I was wondering about are both in bold typeface in the character palette, which makes me think that all of the ones in bold are similar. Here are some more examples:

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Glenn
Are these the same characters you asked about on Teach yourself Japanese's board? Cause I can't see them.

Yes, they are. I think they're only supported by Unicode, so if your browser can't handle Unicode you'll get nonsense.

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gougou
Yes, they are. I think they're only supported by Unicode, so if your browser can't handle Unicode you'll get nonsense.
With Firefox's encoding set to Unicode, I still only see question marks...

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Glenn

Well, in that case I'm not sure. Can anyone see them aside from me?

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Mugi

Interesting. The characters appear perfectly on my computer here at work (Japanese IE 6, set to unicode), but I can't copy them into any other application. My computer at home on the other hand, which should be running the same software, only shows black dots. However, I can copy the characters into a word file and they come out fine so long as I use a Hong Kong font set. :conf

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Mugi

Looking at these characters, most of them (if not all) are 方言字 that don't appear in standard font sets. I can tell you straight off that the [口兮] character is often used in mainland China to represent the possessive pronoun in Hakka (客家話), equivalent to 的 in Mandarin. They're not all from a single dialect, although some may be used by more than one dialect - for instance 冇 is also often used in Hakka (in the same way as in Cantonese) as well as in many 闽 dialects, where it means 不实.

[口了] is used by several dialects in place of 了 when the colloquial pronunciation (白音) differs from literary pronunciation (文音).

[口山] is apparently used in Kunming (昆明) as a sentence final particle.

Can't comment on any of the others yet without further investigation.

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Glenn

How are you finding all of this information? Do you have some encylopedia of dialectical characters or something? This is quite impressive.

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